Ohio Soldiers in the Civil War

Swayne, Wager
Born in Columbus on November 10, 1834, Swayne followed in his father's footsteps, becoming a lawyer. Noah Haynes Swayne was an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court and most likely encouraged his son to pursue a legal career. Continue Reading »
Tod Barracks
Constructed in 1863, Tod Barracks, located in Columbus, Ohio, served as a recruitment and discharge base for soldiers in the Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The site was named in honor of Ohio Governor David Tod. Continue Reading »
Transcription of Letter from Ephraim S. Weaver to Samuel and Mary Weaver
On October 4, 1863, Private Ephraim S. Weaver, a member of Co. K, 68th Regiment, OVI, wrote to his parents, Samuel and Mary Weaver, from Vicksburg, Mississippi. Continue Reading »
Tribe of Dan
During the American Civil War many family members fought alongside one another, and it is believed that at least fifteen members of the McCook family of Ohio fought in the war. Daniel McCook, eight of his sons, his brother John McCook, and his five sons fought for the Union. Continue Reading »
Tribe of John
During the American Civil War many family members fought alongside one another, and it is believed that at least fifteen members of the McCook family of Ohio fought in the war. Daniel McCook, eight of his sons, his brother John McCook, and his five sons fought for the Union. Continue Reading »
Trotter, James Monroe
Born on February 7, 1842 (some sources state that he was born on November 8, 1842 or on February 8, 1842) in Grand Gulf, Mississippi, James Monroe Trotter was born a slave. His mother was Letitia, a slave, and his father was Richard S. Trotter, a white man and his owner. Trotter's father purportedly freed Trotter, Letitia, and Trotter's brother in 1856. Continue Reading »
Trumbull Guards
In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Continue Reading »
Tullahoma Campaign
The Tullahoma Campaign, also known as the Middle Tennessee Campaign, was a series of military engagements fought in south-central Tennessee from June 24 through July 3, 1863, during the American Civil War. The campaign secured middle Tennessee for the Union. Continue Reading »
U.S. Army General Hospital at Gallipolis
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
U.S. General Hospital at Cleveland
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War