Ohio Soldiers in the Civil War

Mount Adams Battery
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Neil's Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery
In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Continue Reading »
Ohio Volunteer Infantry
Historically, British colonies utilized militia forces to defend themselves from attacks by Native Americans and other powers. Once Americans secured their independence in the American Revolution, the new states continued to rely primarily on the militia for military defense. Continue Reading »
Parker, Ely Samuel
Ely Samuel Parker was General Ulysses S. Grant’s personal secretary for the last years of the American Civil War. He also served as Commissioner of Indian Affairs during Grant’s presidency. Continue Reading »
Patterson's Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery
In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Continue Reading »
Paulsen's Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery
In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Continue Reading »
Pickett's Charge
During the first two days of battle at Gettysburg (July 1 and 2, 1863), Robert E. Lee's Confederate forces tried unsuccessfully to flank each end of the Union line. Believing that Union commander General George Meade had weakened the middle of his line in support of the attacks on his flanks, Lee decided, at a council of war on the night of July 2, to launch a frontal assault on the center of the Federal line the next day. Continue Reading »
Pierson, William Seward
William Seward Pierson was born on March 18, 1865 in Durham, Connecticut. He was a graduate of Yale University and eventually moved to Sandusky, Ohio, where he became mayor and a businessman. Pierson also was a member of the Science Lodge No.50, a Masonic organization, in Sandusky. Continue Reading »
Potts' Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery
In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Continue Reading »
President Lincoln's Executive Order Acknowledging the Service of the Ohio National Guard Who Recently Served In the Military Force of the United States as Volunteers for One Hundred Days
On September 10, 1864, President Lincoln issued an executive order acknowledging the patriotic and valuable service of Ohio National Guardsmen. Continue Reading »

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War