Entries in Civil War (1862)

Oak Grove, Battle of
Fought on June 25, 1862, the Battle of Oak Grove, also known as the Battle of French's Field and the Battle of King's School House, was the first engagement of the Seven Days Battles during the Peninsula Campaign. Continue Reading »
Official Confederate Documents of the Civil War Indexed Alpha-numerically
Below is an annotated list of links to official Confederate Civil War documents related to entries in Ohio Civil War Central. The list is indexed alpha-numerically. Click on any link to view a transcript of the selected document. Continue Reading »
Official Confederate Documents of the Civil War Indexed by Date
Below is an annotated list of links to official Confederate Civil War documents related to entries in Ohio Civil War Central. The list is indexed by date. Click on any link to view a transcript of the selected document. Continue Reading »
Ohio Volunteer Infantry
Historically, British colonies utilized militia forces to defend themselves from attacks by Native Americans and other powers. Once Americans secured their independence in the American Revolution, the new states continued to rely primarily on the militia for military defense. Continue Reading »
Olds, Edson Baldwin
Edson B. Olds was a Copperhead leader and three-term U.S. Congressman from Ohio. In 1862, federal officials arrested and imprisoned Olds for disloyalty. Continue Reading »
Opdycke, Emerson
A prominent Union general officer, Ohioan Emerson Opdycke played significant roles at the Battle of Chattanooga and the Battle of Franklin. Continue Reading »
Operations at New Madrid and Island No. 10
Brigadier-General John Pope's successful operations against New Madrid, Missouri and Island No. 10, on the Mississippi River, between February 28 and April 8, 1862, propelled the Union one step closer to placing a stranglehold on the Confederacy by seizing control of the Mississippi River down to Fort Pillow in Tennessee. Continue Reading »
Ord, Edward Otho Cresap
A career United States Army officer, Edward O.C. Ord played major leadership roles in both theaters of the American Civil War and as commander of the Department of the Ohio at the conclusion of hostilities. Continue Reading »
Order Authorizing Arrests of Persons Discouraging Enlistments
On August 8, 1862, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton issued a special order authorizing law enforcement officials to arrest anyone engaged in discouraging volunteer enlistments or engaged in disloyal practices against the United States. Continue Reading »
Order To Prevent Evasion Of Military Duty And For The Suppression of Disloyal Practices
On August 8, 1862, Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton, under the authority of President Abraham Lincoln, issued an order making it it illegal of men eligible for conscription to leave the United States and suspending the constitutionally guaranteed writ of habeas corpus for persons accused of disloyal activites. Continue Reading »
Parker, Ely Samuel
Ely Samuel Parker was General Ulysses S. Grant’s personal secretary for the last years of the American Civil War. He also served as Commissioner of Indian Affairs during Grant’s presidency. Continue Reading »
Paulsen's Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery
In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Continue Reading »
Pea Ridge, Battle of
Fought from March 6 to 8, 1862, the Battle of Pea Ridge, also known as the Battle of Elkhorn Tavern, was the largest battle fought west of the Mississippi River during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Pemberton, John Clifford
Vilified by Northerners for leaving the U.S. Army to fight for the South, and by Southerners for surrendering Vicksburg, Pennsylvanian, John C. Pemberton rose to the rank of lieutenant general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Pendleton, George H.
George Hunt Pendleton was a Democratic Congressman and Senator from Ohio. A leading Peace Democrat during the American Civil War, Pendleton was also the sponsor of the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act of 1883. Continue Reading »
Peninsula Campaign
The Peninsula Campaign, also known as the Peninsular Campaign, was an ill-fated Union offensive launched by Major General George B. McClellan in 1862 that was intended to capture the Confederate capital of Richmond, Virginia and bring a quick end to the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Perryville, Battle of
The Battle of Perryville, also known as the Battle of Chaplin Hills, was the decisive engagement of the Confederate Heartland Offensive of 1862. Continue Reading »
Pickett, George
A prominent Confederate commander during the American Civil War, George Edward Pickett is most remembered for leading a failed assault at Cemetery Ridge during the Battle of Gettysburg. Continue Reading »
Pierson, William Seward
William Seward Pierson was born on March 18, 1865 in Durham, Connecticut. He was a graduate of Yale University and eventually moved to Sandusky, Ohio, where he became mayor and a businessman. Pierson also was a member of the Science Lodge No.50, a Masonic organization, in Sandusky. Continue Reading »
Pillow, Gideon Johnson
A political appointee with little military experience prior to the American Civil War, Brigadier-General Gideon J. Pillow is most remembered for abandoning Fort Donelson in 1861 to avoid being captured by Federal soldiers. Continue Reading »

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War