Southwest Ohio

General Orders, No. 84 (Department of the Ohio)
On June 1, 1863, Major General Ambrose E. Burnside issued General Orders, No. 84 (Department of the Ohio) suppressing the distribution of the New York World and the publication of the Chicago Times because of their anti-war rhetoric. Continue Reading »
Grant, Ulysses S.
Ulysses S. Grant was an American military and political leader who rose from humble beginnings to become General-in-Chief of Union forces during the Civil War and, afterward, the eighteenth President of the United States. Continue Reading »
Guthrie Gray Battalion
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
Jackson Guards
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
Lafayette Guards (Cincinnati)
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
Lafayette Guards (Dayton)
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
Langdon, Elisha Bassett
Born on February 24, 1827 (sometimes incorrectly reported as February 27), Langdon spent his youth on his family's farm near Linwood, Ohio. Langdon's father, Reverend Oliver Langdon, died in September 1828. Continue Reading »
Maxwell, Obediah Craig
Maxwell was born on February 7, 1837 in Franklin, Ohio. Little is known about his youth, but on April 17, 1861, at twenty-four years of age, he enlisted in Company F of the Second Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Continue Reading »
McCoy, Daniel
Born at Rainsboro, Ohio circa 1840, McCoy received a limited education as a child, attending local schools in Highland County, Ohio. With the American Civil War's outbreak, he enlisted as a private in the Twenty-Fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Continue Reading »
Medary, Samuel
Samuel Medary was a prominent Ohio newspaper publisher. During the American Civil War, his newspaper, the Crisis, was a nationally prominent voice for Peace Democrats. Continue Reading »
Montgomery Guards
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
Morgan's Raid
Occurring in July 1863, Morgan's Raid was the only significant Confederate invasion of Ohio to take place during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Morgan's Raiders
Confederate General John Hunt Morgan's cavalry soldiers were known as Morgan Raiders. During the summer of 1863, these men participated in the only significant Confederate invasion of Ohio that occurred during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Morgan, John Hunt
John Hunt Morgan was a Confederate cavalry officer during the American Civil War best known for leading a raid into Indiana and Ohio during the summer of 1863. Continue Reading »
Mount Adams Battery
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Ohio Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans’ Home
In 1869, the Grand Army of the Republic proposed the formation of and began to construct the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphans’ Home to provide for children orphaned when their father died during the American Civil War. The State of Ohio assumed control of the institution in 1870 and eventually permitted children orphaned as a result of any military conflict to reside at the home. Continue Reading »
Pendleton, George H.
George Hunt Pendleton was a Democratic Congressman and Senator from Ohio. A leading Peace Democrat during the American Civil War, Pendleton was also the sponsor of the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act of 1883. Continue Reading »
Portsmouth Guards
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
Price’s Hill Battery
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Schenck, Robert Cumming
Robert Cumming Schenck was an eight-time United States Congressman from Ohio and a major general in the Union army during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »

Featured Entries

Featured Images

Help support the ongoing development of Ohio Civil War Central by clicking the banner and then purchasing products from Amazon.com.

Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War