Northwest Ohio

Camp Toledo
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Camp Vance
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Camp Worcester (Monroeville, Ohio)
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Unfortunately for Dennison, many of Ohio’s militia units were no longer in existence. Those units that continued to operate were primarily social organizations that rarely practiced military maneuvers. Following the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina, in April 1861, President Lincoln called for seventy-five thousand volunteers to subdue the Confederate States of America. Despite the lack of a well-trained militia, Governor Dennison beseeched communities to send their militia companies to Columbus, Ohio for possible use by the North during the American Civil War. To process Ohio’s volunteers, Governor Dennison ordered the creation of Camp Jackson at Columbus. To help speed soldiers’ inductions into Ohio’s military, Dennison soon authorized the establishment of other camps across the state, including Camp Worcester at Monroeville, Ohio. Camp Worcester remained in use from 1861 to 1862. The 3rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Cavalry organized at Camp Worcester. Continue Reading »
Camp Worcester (Norwalk, Ohio)
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Cannon Monument, Woodlawn Cemetery, Lima
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Cole, Charles H.
Little is known of Charles H. Cole's life before and during the first few years of the American Civil War. Numerous sources, including Cole himself, claimed to have been a captain in Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry. Continue Reading »
Cox, Jacob Dolson
Jacob Cox was a nineteenth century American political and military leader who served as a brigadier general in the U.S. volunteer army during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Eagle Monument, Spencerville Township Cemetery, Spencerville
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Hayes, Rutherford B.
Civil War general, U.S. Congressman, and Governor of Ohio, Rutherford Birchard Hayes served as nineteenth President of the United States from March 3, 1877 to March 4, 1881. Continue Reading »
Hoffman Battalion
During the American Civil War, originally known as the Hoffman Battalion, the 128th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry was formed between January 8 and January 15, 1864 at Johnson’s Island, near Sandusky, Ohio, and Camp Taylor, near Cleveland, Ohio. Continue Reading »
Johnson's Island
During the American Civil War, the Union military established a prison for Confederate officers on Johnson's Island in Sandusky Bay of Lake Erie. Completed in April 1862, the prison remained in operation until September 1865, when federal officials sold the land to local residents. Continue Reading »
McPherson, James Birdseye
Killed during the Battle of Atlanta on July 22, 1864, Commander of the Army of the Tennessee Major General James Birdseye McPherson was the highest-ranking Ohioan serving in the United States military to die in the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Michigan, U.S.S.
Built at Erie, Pennsylvania and commissioned in 1843, the U.S.S. Michigan spent its entire career patrolling the Great Lakes. For most of its term of service, it was the only iron-hulled ship patrolling the Great Lakes in the United States Navy. Continue Reading »
Pierson, William Seward
William Seward Pierson was born on March 18, 1865 in Durham, Connecticut. He was a graduate of Yale University and eventually moved to Sandusky, Ohio, where he became mayor and a businessman. Pierson also was a member of the Science Lodge No.50, a Masonic organization, in Sandusky. Continue Reading »
Soldier Monument, Delphos Veterans Memorial Park, Delphos, Ohio
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Soldier Monument, Elm Grove Cemetery, St. Marys, Ohio
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Soldier Monument, Greenlawn Cemetery, Wapakoneta, Ohio
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Soldier Monument, Lafayette, Ohio
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Steedman, James Blair
Born on July 29, 1817, Steedman spent his youth in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, where he worked as a printer’s apprentice. At fifteen years of age, Steedman, now an orphan, moved to Louisville, Kentucky, where he became a printer and, in 1836, embarked with General Sam Houston to help Texans secure their independence from Mexico Continue Reading »

Help support the ongoing development of Ohio Civil War Central by clicking the banner and then purchasing products from Amazon.com.

Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War