Northeast Ohio

Camp Tiffin
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Camp Tod (Cleveland, Ohio)
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Camp Wade
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Camp Wood
With the Civil War’s outbreak, both the North and the South were ill prepared for the conflict. Ohio Governor William Dennison hoped to utilize the state’s militia forces to assist President Abraham Lincoln in reuniting the nation. Continue Reading »
Custer, George Armstrong
Forever linked with Custer's Last Stand, General George Armstrong Custer was a flamboyant and widely renowned American army officer during and after the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Eagle Monument, Geneva City Civil War Monument and Memorial Park, Geneva
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Fighting McCooks
During the American Civil War many family members fought alongside one another, and it is believed that at least fifteen members of the McCook family of Ohio fought in the war. Daniel McCook, eight of his sons, his brother John McCook, and his five sons fought for the Union. Continue Reading »
Fort Fizzle, Battle of
In 1863, due to the declining number of volunteers, the United States government instituted the Conscription Act. Under this directive, which was also referred to as the Enrollment Act, the federal government required states to furnish a certain number of soldiers based on each state's population. Continue Reading »
Garfield, James Abram
James Abram Garfield was an American political and military leader who rose to the rank of major general in the Union army during the American Civil War, and who served as a U.S. Congressman and Senator before being elected as the 20th President of the United States in 1880. Continue Reading »
Giddings, Joshua Reed
Joshua Giddings was a leader in the founding of the Republican Party and an outspoken opponent of the extension of slavery during his twenty-year career as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Continue Reading »
Hatton, Robert
Ohio born Robert Hatton was a United States Congressman from Tennessee and a brigadier general in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
Hibernian Guards
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
John Brown Raiders Monument
Ohio’s American Civil War soldiers and civilians sought to commemorate the troopers’ devotion to and service with the United States by constructing monuments and other memorials. Continue Reading »
Leggett, Mortimer Dormer
Born on April 19, 1821 (commonly mistakenly reported as 1831), in Ithaca, New York, Leggett's parents were members of the Society of Friends. In 1837, at sixteen years of age, Leggett moved with his parents to Geauga County, Ohio, where he helped his family establish a farm. Continue Reading »
Mansfield Guards
With the American Civil War's outbreak, neither the North nor the South had sufficient military forces to conduct a war. Both the United States of America and the Confederate States of America, at first, relied upon volunteers either to form or to bolster their respective militaries. Continue Reading »
McCook, Alexander McDowell
Major General Alexander McDowell McCook, who served as a divisional and a corps commander with the Army of the Ohio and the Army of the Cumberland, was a member of the “Fighting McCooks,” fifteen family members who served the Union during the American Civil War. Continue Reading »
McCook, Anson George
A member of the famed "Fighting McCooks," Brevet Brigadier General Anson McCook participated in the Battle of Bull Run I, took part in many of the major battles and campaigns in the western theater, and served with Major General Philip Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign of 1864 during the Civil War. Continue Reading »
McCook, Charles Morris
Private Charles M. McCook died from a wound received at the Battle of Bull Run I, making him the first member of the famed "Fighting McCook's" to die during the Civil War. Continue Reading »
McCook, Daniel
A member of the famed "Fighting McCooks," sixty-five-year-old Daniel McCook was mortally wounded during the Battle of Buffington Island on July 19, 1863; he died two days later, on July 21. Continue Reading »
McCook, Edward Moody
A member of the famed "Fighting McCooks," Brigadier General Edward M. McCook participaed in the Battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Chickamauga, Brown’s Mill, and Selma during the Civil War. Continue Reading »

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War