29th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1862 - 1865)

Also Known As: Twenty-Ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: November 12, 2012

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

The American Civil War was the bloodiest war in United States history. Ohio helped the federal government by sending 260 regiments of men. The regiments of men that Ohio sent to fight in the war included cavalry, infantry and artillery units. Nearly 330,000 Ohio men served the Union during the war. Of the Ohio men who served, 5,092 were African Americans. Ohioans were not limited to serving in Ohio regiments, with many serving in units from other states, including especially West Virginia, Massachusetts and Kentucky.

Soldiers of Ohio infantry regiments served the Union for varying lengths of time, averaging from one hundred days to three years. These infantry regiments became known as Ohio Volunteer Infantry regiments. Volunteers mainly from Jefferson and Ashtabula Counties formed the 29th Regiment Ohio Voluntary Infantry at Camp Giddings, Ohio on August 1, 1861. The regiment remained in Ashtabula due to unforeseen reasons until December 25, 1861, when the men traveled by train to Camp Chase, in Columbus, Ohio.

The 29th was among the first Ohio regiments to sign on for three years of service, with the men beginning their service on January 17, 1862. On this day, the men received orders to leave Camp Chase, traveling by railroad to Cumberland, Maryland where they were stationed. These Ohio men participated in the Shenandoah Campaign of 1862, which lasted from February to June 1862. There were a number of large battles during the campaign, including The Battles of Kernstown (March 23), McDowell (May 8), Front Royal (May 23), Winchester (May 25), Cross Keys (June 8), and Port Republic (June 9). The overall success of the campaign was on the side of the Confederacy, with General Stonewall Jackson commanding. This campaign was one of Jackson’s signature victories, with the Southerners losing only 2,500 men to the over seven thousand losses of the Union (killed, wounded, and captured/missing).

The 29th Regiment fought in three of these battles. On March 23, these soldiers found themselves in the first significant battle of the Shenandoah Valley Campaign. Near Winchester, Virginia, the 29th fought in the First Battle of Kernstown. Colonel Nathan Kemball led the Union troops to victory against General Jackson’s Southerners. During the battle, the Union lost approximately 590 men to the 718 Confederate casualties (killed, wounded, and captured/missing).

Between March 23 and May 25, the 29th’s men participated in a number of small skirmishes. Two known skirmishes include a May 3 conflict at Mount Jackson, Virginia and another one at Newtown, Virginia on May 24. On May 25, the men participated in the Battle of Winchester, which resulted in a Confederate victory. General Jackson dominated Union General Nathaniel Banks, creating a large disparity in casualties with some estimates having the Union losing five men to every one Confederate man.

On June 9, 1862, the 29th Regiment also fought in the last battle, the Battle of Port Republic, of this campaign. General Jackson led his men to victory over Union General John C. Frémont in a lopsided battle. Jackson led an estimated six thousand men against Frémont’s approximately three thousand soldiers. This two-to-one difference led to significant casualties for the Union. Frémont lost approximately one-third of his men (1,002 casualties), while Jackson had an estimated 816 men killed, wounded, and captured/missing. The 29th remained in the Virginia countryside for two more months before seeing battle again.

On August 9, the Ohio men participated in the Battle of Cedar Mountain, Virginia, which was a costly engagement for both sides. The North’s twelve thousand soldiers, led by General Nathaniel Banks, lost approximately 2,350 men killed, wounded, and captured/missing. The South, consisting of twenty-two thousand of General Stonewell Jackson's soldiers, lost nearly 1,340 men in a Southern victory.

Following the Battle of Cedar Mountain, an officer of the 29th Regiment filed the following report:

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH REGT. OHIO VOL. INFANTRY,

Camp near Culpeper Court-House, Va., August 14, 1862.

SIR:In obedience to your order of this date I have the honor to make the following report of the Twenty-ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the late action near Cedar Mountain, August 9:

I went into the fight with 9 commissioned officers and 180 enlisted men. We were formed in rear of the Seventh Ohio Regiment for the support of a battery stationed on a slight elevation of ground direct to our front. The battery was moved in a short time, and we were left for the support of another battery, stationed to our left. Afterward we moved to the front for the support of the Seventh Ohio Regiment, we coming up on their left. We then opened fire on the enemy, who were on a slight hill beyond the corn field and in the woods to our right. Here we received their fire from both the above-named places. They finally gave way direct in front, and we moved forward and occupied the ground on the hill beyond the corn field, we receiving the same cross-fire (from the woods and to the front). Our support on extreme right giving way, and we fearing our small squad would be captured, fell back to the right of our first position near the battery. Night coming on we fell back to the woods in our rear.

During the engagement my men behaved with the utmost coolness and bravery. No man left the field unless he was wounded or ordered to assist a wounded man back to the rear, and then return to his place in the ranks. We retired in as good order as could be expected, as our numbers were greatly diminished, they being either killed or wounded or assisting our wounded to the rear. During the engagement I had my horse shot, which I was obliged to leave.

The above is respectfully submitted.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W.F. STEVENS,

Capt., Comdg. Twenty-ninth Regiment Ohio Vol. Infantry.

Col. CANDY,

Sixty-sixth Ohio, Commanding First Brigade.

Later that month, from August 28 to30, the 29th Ohio fought in the Battle of Bull Run II in Virginia. General John Pope led the Union forces into battle, while Robert E. Lee commanded the Southern army. The battle was particularly bloody, with over twenty-two thousand losses combined (killed, wounded, and captured/missing). The Union suffered the heaviest casualties, losing nearly 13,800 men, while the Confederates endured approximately 8,300 casualties. This battle was a solid Confederate victory.

The 29th Ohio's next fought at the Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17, 1862. General George McClellan led seventy-five thousand Union soldiers against General Robert E. Lee's fifty-five thousand Confederate soldiers. The battle was very bloody, resulting in over twenty-two thousand combined casualties. The Union suffered approximately 12,401 casualties (killed, wounded, and captured/missing), while the Confederates lost nearly 10,316 men. In fact, The Battle of Antietam was the bloodiest single day battle in the Civil War. The battle was tactically a draw, but strategically, the Union won. The win essentially halted Lee's northern campaign and even prompted President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation on September 22, 1862, which would end slavery in areas still in rebellion against the United States effective January 1, 1863.

The 29th Ohio next fought in the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, from May 1 to 3, 1863. Joseph Hooker led 131,000 Union troops against Robert E. Lee's sixty-one thousand Confederates. Although significantly overmatched, Lee was able to gain a Confederate victory. The Union lost seventeen thousand men killed, wounded, and captured/missing, while the Confederates suffered thirteen thousand casualties.

Following the Battle of Chancellorsville, officers of the 29th Regiment filed the following reports:

CAMP NEAR AQUIA CREEK, VA.,

May 9, 1863.

COL.: In addition to the list of casualties to my command in the late engagement near Chancellorsville, I have the honor to report that on the first day of the engagement we occupied the position of the right-center regiment in the brigade, and in the first movement on the Plank road from near the Chancellor house, and to the left through the woods, our loss was 1 man wounded by a shell. On our return, we occupied our old camping ground of the night previous, but were employed a portion of the night in building an abatis in our front.

During the second day we were twice ordered out as skirmishers in front of our works in the woods, and returned with but a slight loss, though a part of the command had a severe skirmish with the enemy and drove them back. At night we were ordered to lie behind the abatis, in place of some troops that had not proved courageous.

On the morning of the 3d, three companies of the left wing, under the command of Capt. Stevens, were ordered to fill a vacant space in the trenches between the Sixty-sixth Ohio and one hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Regiments, while the seven remaining companies were ordered to report to Gen. Greene, commanding the Third Brigade, and lay within supporting distance of his force in trenches, under a raking fire from the enemy's batteries. There was no flinching, yet the casualties were heavy during the two hours we remained in that position. When the corps on our right fell back, we were ordered to support Knap's battery, placed to rake the plank road leading from the Chancellors house. This position we were ordered to hold at al hazards, and remained at our posts, exchanging shots briskly with the enemy, who were steadily advancing, until all others had left and we were nearly surrounded.

I have since learned that an order was given for us to retreat, which order was not received, and it was only when a further defense was useless that we retired.

It is due to the command to say that the men behaved with great coolness, and fully maintained the former reputation of the regiment for bravery. We retired in good order, though under a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries, to the point where the Twelfth Corps formed a new line of defense, and were permitted to rest on our arms that night.

On the morning of the fourth day, being ordered to report for duty in the Second (Kane's) Brigade, we were placed almost upon the extreme right of the corps, in trenches, which place we occupied until the retreat on the night of the 5th, when to that brigade was assigned the responsible duty of covering the retreat to the pontoon bridge, over which we were to recross the Rappahannock. The attempt of a brigade of another corps, headed by its commander, to cut our column, met with only a partial success near the bridge.

The command has returned in as good a condition as could be expected, considering the long march, rainy weather, bad state of the roads, and exposure to the enemy's fire. Having been in a poor state of health for several days before leaving here, I was on the second day unable to leave camp, at which time the command of the regiment fell on Capt. Stevens, of Company B, during the day. I am also much indebted to him for assistance rendered me as acting field officer during the entire march and fight.

In a command where all have done well, it were useless to speak of individual instances of bravery. I would, however, be permitted to notice particularly Sergt. George E. Hayward, of Company E, who had command of the company, for the able manner in which he handled it during the action, as also for his faithfulness to his command on the march.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

Your obedient servant,

THOS, CLARK,

Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteers.

Col. CHARLES CANDY,

Cmdg. First Brig., Second Div., Twelfth Army Corps.

CAMP NEAR AQUIA CREEK, VA.,

May 30, 1863.

LIEUT.: In obedience to instructions contained in circular from division headquarters, of the 28th instant, I have the honor to transmit an official report of the par taken by this command in our late engagement with the enemy near Chancellorsville, Va.

On May 1, we were ordered into line about 11 a. m., and proceeded down the Plank road with the balance of the brigade for about 1 mile, and taking position on the right of the road, under cover of the woods, awaited for nearly one hour the approach of the enemy. Not meeting him here, I was next ordered to advance through a thick woods and swamp to the support of Gen. Kane's brigade, but was, on reaching there, immediately ordered to return to our first position, meeting with no enemy, but lost 1 man wounded by a shell from the enemy's battery.

About 5 p.m. we returned to our camp of the night previous. Being pressed by the enemy's skirmishers, the main part of the night was spent in constructing an abatis in front of our position, with the One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania on our left and the sixty-sixth Ohio on our right.

On the morning of the 2d, a column of infantry being seen advancing up the Plank road, and a charge of grape and canister having been given it by a section of Knap's battery, this command was ordered into the woods on the left of said Plank road and in front of our line of defense, but, without firing a shot, was ordered to return, and formed a second line, supporting the One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, who were covered by the abatis constructed the night previous.

This position was occupied until again ordered to the front, about 2 p.m., and in nearly the same position as in the early part of the day, but with orders to scour the woods and clear it of sharpshooters. Company D (Capt. Wright) deployed as skirmishers and advanced, discovering the enemy in force-a battery, supported by a brigade of infantry-which fact being duly reported, he was ordered back toward the regiment, when the enemy arose and fired a heavy volley. During this time we were supporting the Seventh Ohio.

A sharp skirmish ensued, resulting in a loss of 5 men wounded in the Twenty-ninth, but a far heavier loss to the enemy. The regiment retired, as ordered, to its former position in rear of the One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania, it being now near night.

Soon after dark I received orders to move to the right and occupy places in intrenchments supposed to have been vacated by parts of other regiments on the appearance of the enemy in front, but which was found out to be a mistake. I found room for but seven companies. The remainder retained their former position.

These places were occupied until 4 o'clock of the next morning (3d instant), the men lying on their arms. At this time I was ordered, with the aforesaid seven companies, to move farther to the right, and report to Gen. Greene, commanding Third Brigade. In this new position we were exposed to a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries, and lost 8 men wounded, when our forces to the right of the Twelfth Corps were driven back. We were ordered by Gen. Greene to return to the Plank road and support Knap's battery, with further subsequent orders from the division commander to hold that position at all hazards, which was maintained with determination until near noon, though exposed to a heavy raking fire of artillery and a direct attack of infantry. In the meantime our battery had withdrawn. All others but the First Brigade had retired. The enemy were pressing hard upon us. Many of our men were disabled. No orders were received to retreat, but it seemed worse than useless to maintain our position longer. A hasty council was held with the commanding officers of the Seventh Ohio and One hundred and Forty-seventh Pennsylvania, an all retired after making one desperate charge on the now hopeful foe and taking several prisoners. Following in the direction taken by the balance of the division, the regiment, though badly cut up, was reformed in the woods near the second line of defense, and permitted to rest for a few hours after dark.

Early on the 4th, with the Fifth Ohio, we were ordered to report to Gen. Kane, commanding Second Brigade, and by his direction placed in the new line of intrenchments, the men lying on their arms, ready to receive and repel any attack.

This position was occupied for over thirty-six hours and during one severe night of cold and rain, until the retreat of the morning of the 6th instant was commenced. The retreat was made quietly and in good order and without any exchange of shots with the enemy.

Arrived at the ford soon after light. Some disturbance was here created by an unjustifiable and unsuccessful attempt to cut the column of my command by a portion of another corps.

In concluding this lengthy report, allow me to say that the men of this command were cool--under the heavy fires to which they were exposed. When each seemed anxious to do his duty, it is difficult making particular distinctions. I would, however, allude to Sergt. George E. Hayward, on whom devolved the command of Company E during the entire march and engagement. He has since been commissioned as first lieutenant by the Governor of Ohio for gallant conduct and faithful service, through the recommendation of the officers of this regiment, but cannot now be mustered as such. I would also express my approval of the service rendered by Capt. W. F. Stevens, who assisted me as a field officer, and on whom the command mainly fell during my severe illness of the second day of the engagement and two days of the march to Chancellorsville.

Your obedient servant,

THOS. CLARK,

Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Twenty ninth Ohio Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. A. G., First Brig., Second Div., Twelfth Army Corps.

The 29th Regiment next participated in stopping Robert E. Lee’s second invasion of the North, which culminated with the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, from July 1 to 3, 1863. General George Meade led the Union against Lee's smaller Confederate army. Gettysburg was the bloodiest battle of the Civil War with an estimated fifty-one thousand Americans killed, wounded, or captured/missing. The Union suffered and estimated twenty-three thousand losses, while the Confederates experienced twenty-eight thousand casualties.

Following the Battle of Gettysburg, officers of the 29th Regiment filed the following reports:

In the Rifle-pits, near Gettysburg, Pa.,

July 4, 1863.

Sir: In compliance with circular from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Corps, I have the honor to forward the following report of the part taken by this regiment (Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry) in the action of July 2 and 3, near Gettysburg, Pa.:

On the morning of the 2d, at 5.30 a. m., we were ordered from our camp, in the wheat-field on the left of the road approaching Gettysburg, to the road, down which we moved with balance of the brigade to rear of the front of our line; from there we moved to the right of our line.

Shortly after, about 8 a. m., we moved to the left in the hollow in rear of the intrenchments occupied by our troops, where we formed in close column of divisions, doubled on the center, as a support to those of our forces in the intrenchments to our front, and remained there during the day until about 7.30 p. m., when we moved with the rest of our brigade to the right and rear to near the road leading to the pike.  We then formed line of battle, and threw out pickets to our front, remaining there until about 2 o'clock on the morning of July 3, when we with our brigade were ordered back to our position in rear of the intrenchments on the right of our line, as a support to Gen. Greene's brigade (Third Brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Corps), then in the intrenchments.

The firing commenced about 3.45 o'clock on the morning of the 3d instant.  We remained as a support to the troops in our front until about 5.45 o'clock, and about fifteen minutes before receiving the order to move forward to the intrenchments, I was struck in the neck with a spent ball, causing very severe pain and giddiness, from which cause I turned the command of the regiment over to Capt. E. Hayes, of this regiment, having received permission of Col. Charles Candy, commanding brigade, to go to the rear.  I returned to the regiment (it being then in the intrenchments) about 12 m. of the 3d instant, but not feeling able to resume command, Capt. Hayes kept command until about 4.30 p. m. of the same day.  Capt. Hayes' report while he was in command is herewith inclosed.

I resumed command at 4.30 p. m.  There was no heavy firing during the balance of the afternoon or evening until just as we were being relieved, when the enemy opened a heavy fire on our right, and moved forward with the intention of storming our position. My command immediately resumed their places in the intrenchments with the One hundred and thirty-seventh Regt. New York Volunteers, who had come forward to relieve us (time, 10 p. m.). We remained until the enemy were forced back, when I brought my command back to the rear in the hollow for rest and rations, as the men had had nothing to eat since the morning of July 2.

We remained here until 1 a. m. on the morning of July 4, when we were again ordered forward to relieve the One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, then in the intrenchments, where we remained until the morning of July 5.

I would refer you to Capt. Hayes' report for instances of bravery and good conduct, as he had command during the hardest of the action.

Both officers and men did their duty well.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WILBUR F. STEVENS,

Capt., Comdg. Twenty-ninth Regt. Ohio Vol. Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. Creigh,

A. A. A. G., First Brig., Second Div., Twelfth Corps.

In the Rifle-pits, near Gettysburg, Pa.,

July 4, 1863.

Sir: I have the honor to report the part taken by the Twenty-ninth Ohio Infantry during the brief space of time it was under my command in the action at Gettysburg, on July 3.

Capt. Stevens turned over the command to me at 5.30 a. m. Shortly after this time I received from Col. Candy, Through Capt. Gwynne, an order to move the regiment forward to the riflepits

and relieve the One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, Col. D. Ireland, then engaged.

As I did not know the exact position our regiment was to occupy, I did not feel justified in taking the regiment into action without first looking at the ground.  I therefore crossed the ridge in front of our position, saw Col. Ireland, and found and ascertained the position we were to occupy.  Returned to my command, and, having briefly explained the work expected of us, gave the necessary orders.

The regiment moved over the ridge at a run without firing a shot until fairly in the trenches, when it opened a heavy fire upon the enemy, under cover of which Col. Ireland was able to withdraw his regiment with but small loss.  Shortly after entering the riflepits, Lieut. George Hayward received a ball in the neck, killing him instantly.

The regiment entered the pits at 5.45 a. m., and was under a heavy fire for two hours and ten minutes, being relieved by the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, under command of Capt.  John Flynn, who came forward in their usual gallant style.  Under cover of their fire, I withdrew my command, and, assisted by Adjt. James B. Storer, formed again in the hollow in rear of our line of battle. This interval of rest was employed by the men in cleaning arms, &c.

At about 9.30 a. m. I received from Col. Charles Candy an order to get into line, ready, if necessary, to repel the enemy, who were pressing the troops near the meadow on the right of our position. They were, however, repelled at this point without our assistance. Shortly after this time, Capt. Horton, adjutant-general of the Third Brigade, came to me with a request that I would take my regiment forward and relieve the troops in the pits in front of us, as they were being hard pressed and were getting short of ammunition.  Ordinarily I should not have felt justified in moving without an order from the commander of our own brigade, but the men in front were falling back by twos and threes, and there did not seem to be any time to lose.  Besides, I had been informed by Lieut. Hitt, of Colonel Candy's staff, that we would soon be ordered forward.  The regiment responded to the order in the most splendid manner, cheering as they charged; but, rapid as was the movement, it was not effected without severe loss.  Lieut. John G. Marsh fell, mortally wounded, and just two-thirds of the loss sustained by the regiment in the whole action occurred while crossing the ridge at this time.

The regiment went into action the second time at 9.55 a. m.  The firing was heavy on both sides until about 11 a. m., when the enemy withdrew from our front, some 5 of their men showing a flag of truce and coming in as prisoners.

Excepting an occasional shot from the enemy's sharpshooters, there was very little fighting from this time until 1 p. m., when the enemy again showed themselves in some force, and the fight was pretty general until nearly 3 p. m., when it again slackened.  At 4.30 p. m. I turned the command over to Capt. Stevens.

You request me to mention any instance of bravery and good conduct that came under my notice.  It is hardly possible to do so where all were alike brave.  I was frequently along the line during the action, and I know that every man did his duty.  Every order was promptly obeyed, and I cannot close my report without mentioning Capt.'s Schoonover, Wright, Baldwin, and Lieut.'s Hulbert, Dice, Wilson, Woodbury, Storer, Russell, Grant, Crane, Fulkerson, and Nash.  They all did well, and obeyed every order promptly that was given.  Lieut. and Adjt. James B. Storer rendered me important assistance in maneuvering the regiment.

In Lieut.'s Hayward and Marsh the regiment loses two valuable officers.  Prompt, cool, brave, and efficient, their loss will long be regretted by the officers and men with whom they were associated.

For an account of the other casualties in the regiment, I respectfully refer you to the accompanying official list.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD HAYES,

Capt., Comdg. Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. Creigh,

A. A. A. G., First Brig., Second. Div., Twelfth Corps.

Following the Battle of Gettysburg, officials transferred the 29th Ohio to the Western Theater, where the regiment participated in the Battle of Lookout Mountain at Chattanooga, Tennessee. Occurring on November 24, 1863, this Union victory resulted in approximately 650 Northern men killed, wounded, or captured/missing compared with 1,200 Confederate losses.

On the next day, the 29th’s men fought in the Battle of Missionary Ridge. The November 25 battle involved Union General Ulysses S. Grant’s forces against Confederate General Braxton Bragg's Southerners. The conflict was severe for both sides, costing the North approximately six thousand men killed, wounded, and captured/missing, with the South losing 6,500 soldiers. With Grant’s victory at this engagement, the North ended the Southerners’ siege of Chattanooga. This victory was significant because Chattanooga became an important supply center during Union General William T. Sherman's Atlanta Campaign the following year.

Following the Battle of Missionary Ridge, an officer of the 29th Regiment filed the following report:

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS,

Wauhatchie, Tennessee, December 12, 1863.

ADJUTANT: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Twenty-ninth Regt. in the late operations against the enemy:

On the morning of the 23d, I received orders to have my regiment ready to move by 8 a.m., at which time the regiment left their camp and marched to the camps previously occupied by the Eleventh Corps, and there I was ordered to relieve a brigade of the Eleventh Corps from picket with my regiment. The number present for duty are as follows: Field and staff officers, 6; line officers, 12; enlisted men, 278. The line of picket was on Lookout Creek, from the railroad bridge south, and joining the picket of the First Brigade, of the Twelfth Corps, on my right.

On the morning of the 24th of November, 1863, I received orders from the colonel commanding the brigade as soon as the troops moved in front of my line of pickets to bring in my regiment. The troops did not move in front of the right wing of my regiment, but did move in front of the left wing. The right wing opened fire on the enemy and from 5 to 15 rounds were used on the enemy, the regiment meeting with no casualties. After the enemy fell back from the creek I brought in the regiment, and received orders from Gen. Butterfield to build two brigades over the above-named creek, and hold them at all hazards, and turn back all stragglers, and allow none but wounded and generals with staff officers and couriers to cross, which duty I did, until the morning of 1st December, when I received orders through Col. J. H. Patrick, from Gen. Geary, to march with my regiment to Ringgold, Ga. I marched the regiment about 2 miles, when I received orders from the colonel commanding to countermarch, and go into our old camp at Wauhatchie, Tennessee, which I did, meeting with no casualties, either to officers or enlisted men, leaving one company at the upper bridge for guard duty, until I received orders from Gen. Geary, December 2, 1863, to march with the Fifth and Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteers on Lookout Mountain, and on the 3d day of December I received orders from Gen. Geary to bring the above-named regiments to our original camp again, and report in person to Maj.-Gen. Hooker, and received orders from Gen. Hooker to report back to Gen. Geary, and then received orders to go into camp. All of which I most respectfully report.

I remain, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM T. FITCH,

Col. Twenty-ninth Regt. Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

During the winter of 1863-1864, officials dispatched the 29th Ohio to New York, New York to aid Northern authorities in carrying out the draft.

Following the 29th Regiment’s brief sojourn in New York, the command next participated in General Sherman's Atlanta Campaign, which occurred from May 7 to September 2, 1864. The multi-month campaign against Confederate Generals Joseph E. Johnston and John Bell Hood included over fifteen battles and saw the loss of an estimated sixty-nine Northern and Southern Americans killed, wounded, and captured/missing. The Union suffered more losses, an estimated thirty-seven thousand men, compared to the Confederacy’s thirty-two thousand casualties.

The 29th Ohio participated in the Atlanta Campaign’s first battle, the Battle of Rocky Face Ridge, from May 7 to 13, 1864. General William T. Sherman led the Union to victory against Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. There are no reliable records for the casualty totals for either side. On the same day that Rocky Face Ridge ended, the Battle of Resaca began. This engagement lasted from May 13 to 15, 1864 and saw both sides losing approximately the same number of men. The Union lost 2,747 men, while the Confederacy lost 2,800 killed, wounded, and captured/missing.

Following the Battle of Resaca, the 29th Ohio’s soldiers fought in the Battle of Adairsville on May 17. During this battle, General Sherman’s Northerners defeated General Johnston’s Southerners.

From May 26 to June 4, 1864, the 29th Ohio participated in three battles. On May 25 and 26, the soldiers fought in the Battle of New Hope Church. This engagement resulted in a victory for the Confederacy, with the Union losing 1,665 men to the South’s 350 casualties. From May 26 to June 4 the troops engaged in the Battle of Dallas, Georgia. This Union victory has no reliable casualty statistics. On May 27, the 29th also participated in the Battle of Pickett’s Mill. This Confederate victory pitted Union General Oliver Howard against Confederate General Patrick Cleburne. In this conflict, the Union lost 1,600 men compared to just five hundred Confederate casualties.

The 29th Ohio next fought in the Battle of Pine Mountain, also known as the Battle of Pine Knob. Occurring on June 14 and 15, 1864, this engagement pitted General Patrick Cleburne against Union General Joseph Hooker. The Southerners emerged from the battle victorious. On June 22, the 29th’s soldiers participated in the Battle of Kolb’s Farm. This Union victory had Northern General John Schofield against Confederate General John Hood. There are no reliable casualty reports for this engagement.

On June 27, 1864, the 29th Regiment participated in the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia. General Sherman led the North against General Johnston's Southern forces during this Confederate victory. Sherman lost approximately three thousand men killed, wounded, and captured/missing, compared to only five hundred for Johnston. Despite enduring more casualties at this engagement, Sherman continued his advance upon Atlanta.

On July 20, 1864, the 29th engaged Confederate forces at the Battle of Peachtree Creek, in Georgia. General George Thomas led the Union to victory against Confederate General John Bell Hood. The Union lost approximately 1,700 men killed, wounded, and captured/missing, with the Confederates suffering nearly five thousand casualties.

From August 5 to 7, 1864, the 29th Regiment fought in the Battle of Utoy Creek. Confederate General Hood led his men to victory in this engagement against Sherman’s Northerners. The Union suffered an estimated two thousand casualties killed, wounded, and captured/missing, compared to an estimated 250 Confederate losses.

The 29th Ohio Volunteer Infantry fought in the final battle of the Atlanta Campaign from August 31 to September 1, 1864. This engagement, the Battle of Jonesboro, resulted in a Union victory. Hood lost an estimated three thousand men, while Sherman had 1,600 soldiers killed, wounded, and captured/missing. Atlanta fell to Sherman’s men the following day.

During the Atlanta Campaign, officers of the 29th Regiment filed the following reports:

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,

Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864.

LIEUT.: I have the honor to report that the Twenty-ninth Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry occupied the extreme left of our battle line at Mill Creek Gap, Ga., in the action of the 8th day of May, 1864, at the foot of the mountain. Our right rested on the road leading up the hill; arrived at point nearest the enemy's line, our left was swung to the right so that our entire line rested parallel to and at the road, our left not more than 120 yards from the top of the hill. We could have held our position if supplies of ammunition could have reached us, but after stripping the cartridges from the dead and wounded, and exhausting them, we were ordered to fall back. I immediately deployed a line of skirmishers, and directed the killed and wounded to be moved off the field. The ammunition of the skirmishers being entirely expended the enemy became more bold. Their fire being directed on those engaged in carrying off the killed and wounded, obliged us to abandon some of our dead; the wounded were all brought off. After leaving the field the Twenty-ninth joined the brigade on the road a half mile south of the hospital; remained until 11 a. m. of the 9th; moved 500 paces south, constructed breast-works, and remained in this position until 7 a. m. of the 12th; marched about ten miles; encamped in Sugar Valley near Snake Creek Gap; rested until 2 p. m. 13th; marched two miles east; went into line of battle on side hill [in] position; Twenty-ninth second battalion in line of First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps; fortified; lay in our trenches until 4 p. m. 14th; marched a distance of seven miles; took position on extreme left of our lines at 1.30 a. m. 15th; rested until 11 a. m; moved to the right; took position at the foot of a hill where the Second Division, Twentieth Corps, was engaging the enemy; assisted provost guard until 6 p. m; received orders to move to the right in support of Second Brigade; started; order was countermanded; at 8 received orders to move to the left in support of first line; did so, taking position ten paces immediately in rear of One hundred and Second New York and One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, left of Twenty-ninth forming obtuse angle to the rear; remained until 8 a. m 16th; marched twelve miles, fording Connesauga River; ferried across the Coosawattee at Bryant's Ford; went into camp in large field, Twenty-ninth on picket; remained until 11 a. m. 17th; marched in rear of division train seven miles, and camped near Adairsville, Ga. 19th, moved at 6.30 a. m.; supported skirmishers until 7 p. m.; two companies of Twenty-ninth deployed as skirmishers near Cassville moved in line of battle to crest of hill west of Cassville, Twenty-ninth on right of Twentieth Corps; remained until 8 a. m. 21st; moved one mile west for convenience of shade and water; remained here until 6 a. m. 23d; marched about 7 miles; encamped near Etowah River in line of battle, Twenty-ninth on right of First Brigade. May 24, marched at 4.30 a. m.; formed line of battle on Raccoon Ridge, Twenty-ninth on extreme left of second line; moved in columns of two battalions to ------Creek; crossed; ascended Raccoon Mountain; moved along the ridge to Burnt Hickory; camped at 6.30, making a march of nine miles. 25th, marched at 7 a. m., First Brigade in advance; crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek; came on the enemy; double-quicked forward into line, Twenty-ninth on extreme left; was attacked on flank; formed crochet by swinging left wing to rear; repulsed the attack: went into position on ridge, Twenty-ninth second battalion from left of First Brigade; built breast-works; had some warm skirmishing; at 4.30 threw out a line of skirmishers to the front; immediately moved out in support in line of battle, with right resting on Dallas road; marched about a mile; halted for the arrival of brigade; Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, passed to right; at 6 joined brigade on left; moved forward and engaged the enemy, Twenty-ninth on extreme left of Twentieth Corps; fire very heavy; advance to rise of hill, Twenty-ninth two rods in advance of entire line; very dark; fire relaxed; at 8 p. m. threw out skirmishers; was told we had two lines in front; reconnoitered; found the enemy only 150 paces in front. Immediately commenced fortifying with bayonets and tin plates and what logs could be gathered; gathered logs from nearly the same ground with the enemy; succeeded in getting two picks and a spade from the Second Brigade; at light the enemy's sharpshooters fired briskly, but we had sufficient shelter, so that our loss was slight; our left was entirely exposed; received a detachment Fourth Corps; deployed them as skirmishers on the left; remained here until 11 a. m. 26th; was relieved by Thirty-sixth Illinois Volunteers; moved to the right and rear 100 paces into a ravine under cover; remained until 7.30 p. m. 28th; relieved One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers in front line, threw out skirmishers in front, connecting on right with One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, on left with Fifth Ohio; strengthened our works; remained until 8 p. m.; Twenty-ninth was relieved by Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers; returned to ravine; few casualties; brought off our dead at night and buried them; remained in ravine until 9 p. m. 31st; entire regiment worked all night on fortifications.

At light June 1 returned to ravine; remained until 1.45 p. m.; marched to the left about six miles; went into column of battalions and camped for the night near Marietta Cross-Roads. June 2, at

11.30 moved to the front a mile and a half and halted; loaded, and moved to the right about 300 paces; went into column of divisions along and facing the Acworth road; Twenty-ninth third battalion of First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps; remained here until 5.30 a. m. 6th; marched about three miles; went into camp near crossing of Acworth and Big Shanty roads; remained here until 6.30 p. m.; moved to the left about 100 yards; occupied the works made by the Seventh Ohio and One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; right of Twenty-ninth resting opposite southeast corner of Adams' house and left on Big Shanty road. 11 a. m. June 14 moved to the right a mile; took position on right of Third Brigade. Twenty-ninth on extreme right of First Brigade; at 11 a. m. June 15 moved one mile to the front; formed line of battle on ridge near Pine Knob, Twenty-ninth on left of First Brigade; stopped about two hours; moved to the front and right about 200 yards; went into position on ridge perpendicular to and left resting near enemy's line of works; threw out skirmishers on our left; at 5.30 p. m. moved to the left over the works, right flank into line of battle, Twenty-ninth on right of First Brigade; came upon the enemy's skirmish line; moved briskly forward, following the enemy's skirmishers closely; arrived near second line of enemy's works; fighting became very severe; continued so until 11 p. m.; severity of fight partially relaxing; commenced a line of breast-works; worked on the same until 7 a. m 16th; was relieved by Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers; moved down a ravine to the right and rear to reserve line, connecting on left with Fifth Ohio; at dark moved to the left; occupied works of Fifth Ohio; repaired works until 12 m. At 3.30 a. m. 17th moved over the works to the front; moved slowly; often halting, waiting on the skirmishers; marched about two miles; went into position under cover of a hill in support of Thirteenth New York Battery, Twenty-ninth on left of brigade; remained until 8.30 a. m. 19th; moved to the right one mile; went into line on a ridge; threw up some works, Twenty-ninth on right of First Brigade. At 6 p. m. 20th moved to the right two miles; halted; Twenty-ninth on picket in front of Second Division. At 10 a. m. 21st was relieved; took position as fourth battalion in line of First Brigade on Big Shanty road; built strong works. At 10 a. m. 22d moved to the front one mile; took position on a hill in open field near Kenesaw Mountain; threw up heavy works, Twenty-ninth fourth battalion of First Brigade; had some fighting, but no casualties in Twenty-ninth; remained here. Nothing of importance transpired until 7 p. m. 27th of June, when we moved to the right and front 300 yards; Twenty-ninth supported Bundy's (Thirteenth New York) battery; moved to the left 500 yards, but could get no position, and returned to the brigade; took position on extreme left of First Brigade; threw up some works; remained until 9 p. m. 30th; moved three miles to the right; occupied works of a portion of the Twenty-third Corps; skirmish fire very brisk and continuous; some casualties in the Twenty-ninth.

At 8.30 p. m. July 1 moved to rear half a mile into reserve line. At 8 p. m. 2d Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry were sent as pickets to line occupied on the 1st of July. At 3 a. m. 3d found that the enemy had vacated their works in front; moved forward, occupied them, and waited the arrival of the rest of the division; at 6.30 moved forward, Twenty-ninth on extreme right of skirmish line; had considerable skirmishing, but no casualties; at 6.30 p. m. went into camp near Nickajack Creek. At 5 p. m. 4th moved to the left half a mile; laid in line of battle over night, Twenty-ninth on left of First Brigade. At 7 a. m. 5th moved to front and right five miles; remained till 9 a. m. 6th; moved to front and right three-quarters of a mile; went into position on ridge in woods near Chattahoochee River, Twenty-ninth on right of First Brigade, perpendicular to main and in two lines; at 3.30 moved to the left and front about three miles; went into camp for the night. At 9 a. m. 7th moved to the left and front about three miles; went into position on ridge near Chattahoochee River, Twenty-ninth second line on left of First Brigade; nothing of note occurred; occasional skirmishing, but no casualties; remained here until 6 p. m. 17th; moved to the left four miles; crossed Chattahoochee River near Vining's Station; moved on three-quarters of a mile and went into camp for the night; 3.30 p. m. moved to the front three miles; halted for the night at cross-roads of Howell's Mill and Buck Head; put up some temporary works. At 6 a. m. 19th moved to right and front about four miles; crossed Peach Tree Creek and went into position on ridge in edge of woods; constructed a line of works; remained here until 10 a. m. 20th; moved to right and front about three-quarters of a mile; went into line of battle on a ridge, Twenty-ninth second battalion of First Brigade; commenced throwing up works, but were attacked in very heavy force before we had time to complete them. The regiment on our right being flanked and driven, the enemy came upon our flank and rear and we were forced to fall back in some disorder. After reaching the foot of the hill on which the line was located, the regiment was being reformed when it was ordered to go to the second line of works. On reaching there the Twenty-ninth was immediately deployed for the purpose of rallying all men who came back and forming them in line at the works. This was accomplished at 6 p. m. and the whole line was again moved forward to the battle line from which they had fallen back. Being slightly wounded during the action, after the regiment reformed the command was turned over at 6 p. m. 20th of July to Capt. Wilbur F. Stevens, who has been in command since.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MYRON T. WRIGHT,

Capt., Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Vol. Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

HDQRS. TWTENTY-NINTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,

Atlanta, Ga., September 8, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with special orders, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Twenty-ninth Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry during the present campaign from July 20, 1864:

The regiment was turned over to me by Capt. Wright, he having received a slight wound. After reforming on the hill occupied by us the night before, I was then ordered with the regiment back to our old position. Arriving here I was ordered to form line in rear of Sixtieth New York Volunteers, who lay in works as a support to said line. Here we remained until the morning of the 22d of July, nothing occurring worthy of note; when orders were received to march at 7 a. m., Twenty-ninth occupying the second battalion of First Brigade; marched to within one mile and a half northwest of Atlanta, where we established line and threw up heavy works, Twenty-ninth occupying third battalion of the brigade. During the day and night all quiet. 23d, some shelling by the enemy but no casualties. 24th, ordered to send detail in front to cut logs for advanced works; no casualties. 25th, new line of works laid out and detail made to complete the same. 26th, ordered to move at daylight, but order countermanded; moved over to new line of works about dark. 27th, placed abatis in front of works. 28th, heavy shelling from enemy; casualties in Twenty-ninth was 1 sergeant killed and 2 privates wounded. All quiet up to August 1. At daylight ordered to have men put on their accouterments and remain in works. On the 3d demonstration in front and left by enemy. All quiet up to 24th, when received orders to be ready to move. Tents struck at 8.30 p. m. Marched at 9 o'clock, regiment occupying the second battalion in line of march. Marched all night; took breakfast at 6. 30. a. m. 25th near Pace's Ferry, Chattahoochee River. Resumed line of march at 7.30 a. m. Twenty-ninth ordered to take position about one mile and a half below Pace's Ferry, and about one mile above the railroad bridge, on a hill, placing the men in pits six paces apart and three men in a pit; nearly completed the pits. 26th, completed the pits and commenced slashing the timber in front. 29th, received orders about noon to form a new line in front and to the left of One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. Commenced works with a detail; were relieved by Sixty-sixth Ohio and moved regiment to new line. All quiet. 30th, completed works. 31st, detailed one commissioned officer, five noncommissioned, and twenty-five privates to report to Col. Flynn, of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, with one day's rations. September 4, orders to be ready to move and join brigade as it passed by; marched at 9 a. m., Twenty-ninth fourth battalion of First Brigade; arrived in the city of Atlanta about 2 p. m.; marched through the city; took up position west of the city, occupying a line of works, right of regiment resting on fort.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. F. STEVENS,

Capt., Comdg. Twenty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps

The 29th remained in Atlanta after its fall until November 15, when the regiment embarked upon General William T. Sherman’s famous “March to the Sea.” The march lasted from November 15 to December 21, 1864 and involved the Union marching 250 miles to Savannah, Georgia. During this march, the Union soldiers supplied themselves from Southern civilians, cutting a sixty-mile wide swath of destruction along the entire 250-mile march. The Northerners captured Savannah on December 21, 1864.

During the “March to the Sea,” officers of the 29th Regiment filed the following reports:

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH Regt. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,

Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with circular from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps, dated Savannah, Ga., December 23, 1864, I have the honor to make the following report of my command:

I assumed command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio on the 8th day of September, 1864, at Atlanta, Ga. From this date to the 24th nothing of note took place more than the regular routine of camp duty. September 25 had review. September 28 received detail to go to Nashville, Tenn., with my regiment. September 29, at 9 a.m., I marched the regiment to Capt.-'s quarters for transportation; failed, and returned to camp. October 2, received orders to move at once with one day's rations, marched to the depot at 3 p.m.; moved to the Chattahoochee River; disembarked and marched across the river; camped for the night. 4th, put my command on the train for Nashville, when I received a telegram to return to Atlanta. Recrossed the river and took the cars for Atlanta. After arriving in the city went into camp two miles northwest from depot, facing south. 11th, moved the regiment to the right half a mile, and came into line where the One hundred and second New York was. 18th, moved camp again three-quarters of a mile farther to the right, near a fort. 20th, received orders to move at 7 a.m. [21st]; marched the regiment to brigade headquarters; remained there till 7.30, when the brigade moved, Twenty-ninth in center of second section of train; passed through Decatur; Twenty-ninth on picket in night. 22d and 23d, foraged pretty extensively; Twenty-ninth lost 1 man killed, William D. Haynes, private Company D. 24th, returned to camp with teams well loaded with forage. Nothing special occurred from this date to end of month. November 5, received orders at 2 p.m. to march. Moved out on the McDonough road about one mile and went into camp for the night, Twenty-ninth on extreme right of division. 6th, returned to Atlanta and went into our old camp, 8th, election day; some excitement in Twenty-ninth; polled 384 votes; Lincoln received 344; McClellan, 40. 9th, at sunrise our line was attacked; immediately moved the Twenty-ninth into position; sent out skirmishers; attack did not reach us; remained in trenches until 12 m., then moved back to quarters and stacked arms.

I am, with much respect, your obedient servant,

MYRON T. WRIGHT,

Maj. Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Brig., Second Div., 20th Corps.

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH Regt. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,

Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1864.

LIEUT.:

15th [November], broke up camp at 6.30; marched slowly; stopped at decatur for dinner, then marched in the direction of Stone Mountain; reached the base of Stone Mountain at 11 p. m. and encamped for the night; Twenty-ninth in the rear of the First Brigade. 16, marched at 9 a. m. in between portions of the train; crossed Yellow River, and encamped for the night at 8 p. m. 17th, marched at 5 a. m.; camped near Social Circle at 5 p. m. for the night. 18th, marched about nine miles in forenoon, stopping often to tear up the railroad track went into camp near Madison at 5 p. m. 19th, broke camp at 5 a. m.; Twenty-ninth rear guard of division; marched until 4 p. m. and camped for the night near Parks' Mill. 20th, marched about seven miles; camped near Dunham's. 21st, marched at 6.30 a. m.; halted at 4.30 p. m. for the night. 22d, moved at 7.30 a. m. and arrived at Milledgeville, Ga., at 9 p. m., and camped about three miles south of town. 23d, remained in camp; Twenty-ninth went on picket at 4 p. m. 24th, moved at 7 a. m.; Twenty-ninth (first battalion of First Brigade) marched fifteen miles and camped for the night. 25th, marched at 8 a. m.; Twenty-ninth trains guard; arrived at Buffalo Creek; found the bridge destroyed; parked the train and stacked arms for dinner; remained here until the bridge was repaired, then crossed and went into camp for the night. 26th, moved at 8 a. m. in rear of the train; marched slowly until 1 p. m.; arrived in Sandersville; halted for dinner, then moved to Station 13; took the railroad to the east, tore up about one miles and a half of track, then went into camp for the night at 6 p. m.; marched thirteen miles. 27th, was called up at 1.30 a. m. by alarm; remained in line two hours, then lay down again; marched at 8 a. m.; commenced tearing up track; worked until noon; took dinner and lay quiet until 3 p. m., then marched rapidly; arrived in Davisborough at 9.30 p. m.; marched about thirteen miles. 28th, moved out on the railroad and tore up track until 5 p. m.; marched back to Davisborough and camped near our old camp. 29th, moved at 7.30; moved in a southeasterly direction until 7 p. m., and encamped for the night near Bostwick. 30th, marched at 7; crossed the Ogeechee River; marched about six miles and camped for the night.

December 1, moved at 8 a. m.; marched until dark and camped; marched about nineteen miles. 2d, marched at 6 a. m.; moved briskly until 12 m.; halted at-Creek for dinner; found the bridge destroyed and enemy on the other side. Twenty-ninth received orders to drive the enemy out of reach of the bridge and hold the ground; fell in, loaded, and moved across; moved about half a mile; came in contact with the enemy in small force; deployed three companies to the left of the road; deployed a line of skirmishers 500 yards to left of woods, the right resting in woods on right of road; also sent four companies, under command of Capt. Jonas Schoonover, to cover two roads leading from main road; commenced firing and drove the enemy from their position; advanced steadily to a ridge in open field about one mile from the bridge; threw up some works and extended the line to connect with Capt. Schoonover; here waited until the bridge was finished, then joined the brigade in the field and camped for the night. 3d, moved at 10 a. m. and marched all day and night; made a distance of ten miles; camped near Millen, Ga. 4th, moved at 9 a. m.; marched about three miles; halted for repairing of a bridge; moved again at 2.30 p. m.; arrived at Big Hose Creek, and halted for trains to pass; crossed at 8 and camped for the night. 5th, moved at 7 a. m.; Twenty-ninth in charge of First and Third Brigade trains; moved fifteen miles and went into camp at 5 p. m. 6th, moved at 9; halted for supper at 6 p. m.; then crossed a big swamp and camped for the night. 7th, marched at 7 a. m.; Twenty-ninth assisted the trains; crossed Turkey Creek at dark; camped near Springfield. 8th, moved at 7 a. m.; marched twelve miles and camped for the night. 9th, marched at 9 a. m.; took dinner near Eden; went into camp for the night at Walthour [Monteith] Swamp. 10th, received orders to report to Col. Jones, Second Brigade; joined Second Brigade and marched back to the train; Twenty-ninth took position on the same grounds where we got dinner on the 9th; sent a company forward about 600 yards for picket; moved at 12 m.; Twenty-ninth took position in front of last 100 wagons; marched very briskly until 6 p. m.; joined First Brigade and went into camp for the night. 11th, moved at 10 a. m.; Twenty-ninth on right of First Brigade; moved to the Savannah River, with instructions to deploy a line connecting with Third Brigade on the right and extending to the river, with a heavy reserve at the river; found Col. Barnumn's line rested on it, and took position in supporting distance of his left; followed his skirmishers in line of battle to a fence about 700 yards from the enemy's works; remained here until 4 p. m; joined the brigade, and moved to the right about half a mile; went into position on a road perpendicular to the river, about four miles and a half from the city of Savannah, Ga. 12th, in line of the battle before Savannah; Twenty-ninth moved to the left in support of Third Brigade, which was to charge a fort in their front, but found a canal that they could not cross; they came back to their works; Twenty-ninth returned to our old position; nothing of interest occurred during the day. 13th, in line before Savannah; at 10 a. m. moved the Twenty-ninth to the rear about 300 yards; prepared timber or rifle-pits; at 4 p. m. took the four right companies on to the picket-line and placed them on duty; at 9 advanced the line 150 yards into an open field and put up pits. 14th, on skirmish line; considerable firing on both sides; Twenty-ninth pickets relieved by Fifth Ohio. 15th to 18th, nothing worthy of note transpired. 19th, received instructions to take charge of the fortifications in front of the First Brigade; commanded work at dark. While laying out a connection between Forts 2 and 3 I received a severe wound in my left foot. I then turned the command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry over to Capt. Jonas Schoonover.

I am, with much respect, your obedient servant,

MYRON T. WRIGHT,

Maj. Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Brig., Second Div., Twentieth Corps.

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH Regt. OHIO VET VOL. INFTY.,

Savannah, Ga., December 28, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with circular from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps, dated Savannah, Ga., December 23, 1864, I have the honor most respectfully to make the following report:

I took command of the Twenty-ninth Ohio in front of Savannah, Ga., December 20, 1864. Nothing worthy of note occurred during this day. At 4 a. m. of the 21st the Twenty-ninth, in advance of First Brigade, took up a line of march to the city of Savannah, and from there to Fort Jackson, Ga., where I reported to Col. Flynn, of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, for duty, and performed garrison duty until December 24, when the Twenty-ninth was ordered to march at 9.30 a. m., Twenty-ninth in rear of Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and marched to and through the city where we are now encamped.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JONAS SCHOONOVER,

Capt., Cmdg. Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Vol. Infantry.

First Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., First Brig., Second Div., Twentieth Corps.

The 29th Ohio’s soldiers remained in Savannah until January 27, 1865, when they embarked upon Sherman’s Carolinas Campaign. During the advance, the 29th Ohio, along with other Union forces, fought several small battles and also tore up the landscape as they made their way through the Carolinas. On March 24, 1865, the men arrived in Goldsboro, North Carolina, where they encamped for ten days. On April 10, the men advanced to Raleigh, North Carolina, arriving at this city on April 14. On April 26, 1865, Confederate General Joseph Johnston surrendered to Union General William T. Sherman, essentially bringing the Civil War to a conclusion.

During the Carolinas Campaign, officers in the 29th Regiment filed the following reports:

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFANTRY,

Goldsborough, N. C., April 1, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the Twenty-ninth  Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, from the time we left Savannah, Ga., up to the time of the occupation of Goldsborough, N. C.:

January 27, 1865, marched at 8 a. m., Twenty-ninth in rear of Sixty-sixth Ohio; camped at 2.30 p. m., marched twelve miles. January 28, moved at 7 a. m.; marched ten miles and camped for the night. January 29, marched at 6.30 a. m.; passed through Springfield; halted at 2 p. m.,; and encamped for the night near Sister's Ferry. January 30, remained in camp; three companies went on picket. January 31, in camp; regiment was inspected by Gen. Pardee at 9 a. m.

February 1, 2, 3, remained in camp, nothing special taking place. February 4, marched at 6 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of First Brigade; crossed the Savannah River into South Carolina at Sister's Ferry; marched five miles and camped; Twenty-ninth on picket. February 5, relieved at 2 p. m. and marched in rear of brigade; camped at 9.30 p. m. February 6, marched at 7 a. m.; halted for dinner at 11; marched at 12 m. and camped at 5 p. m; marched fifteen miles. February 7, marched at 6 a. m.; marched six miles and camped at 6.30 p. m. February 8, marched at 6 a. m.; took dinner at 11; moved again at 12 m.; camped at 3.15 p. m., near Buford's Bridge. February 9, marched at 6 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade and with ordnance train; marched eighteen miles; camped at 5 p. m. near Blackville. February 10, marched at 7 a. m.; halted at Blackville, and at 2 p. m. marched and crossed the South Edisto River; camped for the night at 10 p. m.; Twenty-ninth in rear of brigade. February 11, remained in camp. February 12, marched at 6 a. m.; met the enemy on the North Edisto and had some skirmishing; 1 man killed and 3 wounded in Twenty-ninth; camped near the river at dark. February 13, crossed the river at 6 a. m.; some more skirmishing; enemy fell back and we marched on; Twenty-ninth on picket during the night. February 14, marched at 8 a. m.; moved six miles and camped; Twenty-ninth on picket. February 15, marched at 7 a. m., in rear of brigade; camped at 3 p. m. near Lexington. February 16, moved at 8 a. m. one mile to the rear on picket; at 3.30 p. m. fell in and marched as rear guard of Twentieth Corps; camped at 4 p. m. February 17, marched at 9 a. m. in a northwesterly direction; marched five miles and camped near Columbia. February 18, marched at 6.30 a. m.; crossed the Saluda River; camped at 5 p. m. February 19, moved at 3.30 p. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of First Brigade; marched four miles and camped at 11.30; Twenty-ninth on picket. February 20, marched at 1 p. m., in rear of brigade;  crossed Broad River at Frost's [Freshly's] Mill. February 21, marched at 6 a. m.; entered Winnsborough 11.30 a. m.; sent five companies on picket. There remaining five companies camped for the night. February 22, left Winnsborough at 3.40 p. m.; marched six miles and camped; February 23, marched at 6.30 a. m.; crossed the Catawba River at 11 p. m.; camped at 12 midnight. February 24, marched at 9.30 a. m. with the train; marched until 4.30 p. m. and camped. February d25, remained in camp all day. February 26, marched at 7 a. m.; Twenty-ninth advance of First Brigade; camped at 3 p. m.; marched ten miles. February 27, moved camp one mile and a half across Hanging Rock Creek and camped. February 28, marched at 6.30 a. m., Twenty-ninth in rear of brigade; camped at 1 p. m.; mustered the regiment for pay.

March 1, marched at 1 p. m.; camped at 9 p. m. near Big Lynch's Creek. March 2, moved at 8 a. m.; marched twelve miles and camped for the night. March 3, marched at 6.30 with wagon train; reached Chesterfield at 11.30 p. m. and camped. March 4, marched at 7 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade; camped at 4 p. m.; marched nine miles. March 5, remained in camp all day. March 6, moved at 8.30 a. m. in rear of brigade; reached Cheraw at 1.15 p. m.; hated until 4 p. m., then fell in and crossed the Great Pedee River; marched four miles and camped. March 7, marched at 7 a. m. on the Fayetteville road; marched sixteen miles and camped. March 8, moved at 11.30 a. m. and camped at 10.15 p. m. March 9, marched at 6.30 a. m.; marched thirteen miles and camped at 6 p. m. March 10, marched at 3.30 p. m., Twenty-ninth advance of brigade; marched four miles and encamped; March 11, marched at 6.30 a. m., Twenty-ninth in rear of brigade; camped at 2.20 a. m. of the 12th. March 12, moved at 8 a. m. on plank road leading to Fayetteville; camped at 4 p. m. March 13, marched at 2.30 p. m. through Fayetteville, N. C., to the Cape Fear River and halted. March 14, crossed the river at 4.30 a. m.; marched two miles, then halted for breakfast; remained in camp for the day. March 15, marched at 12 m. with the train; camped at 11 p. m. March 16, marched at 9 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade; camped at 7 p. m.; Twenty-ninth on picket. March 17, remained on picket; all quiet. March 18, marched at 7 a. m. in rear of brigade; marched eight miles and camped. March 19, moved at 11 a. m. with the train; received orders after we got to camp to pack up and move on; took the Goldsborough road and joined the corps; marched all night. March 20, rested all day. March 21, no move to-day. March 22, marched at 8 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade; camped at 12 midnight; marched fifteen miles. March 23, marched at 6 a. m., Twenty-ninth in rear of brigade and Second Division; crossed Neuse River and camped for the night. March 24, entered Goldsborough at 12 m.; camped at 4.30 p. m. near town. March 25, moved camp two miles from town, where we still remain.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JONAS SCHOONOVER,

Capt., Cmdg. Twenty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

HDQRS. TWENTY-NINTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY.,

Near Bladensburg, Md., May 28, 1865.

CAPT.: In compliance with circular orders from First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps, dated May, 1865, I have the honor to respectfully report the following of the march from Goldsborough, N. C., to this place:

April 10, 1865, left Goldsborough, N. C., at 6 a. m., Twenty-ninth Ohio fourth regiment in brigade; camped at 11 p. m. 11th, marched at 6 a. m. and camped near Smithfield at 3 p. m. 12th, moved at 9 a. m.; halted at 6.30 p. m. for camp. 13th, marched at 5.15 a. m.; Twenty-ninth, advance of brigade, reached Raleigh, N. C., at 2 p. m.; marched to the west side and camped. Remained in this camp until the 24th; were inspected and reviewed during this time. 25th, marched at 9 a. m. in a northwest direction, Twenty-ninth rear of First Brigade; marched about fifteen miles, and camped for the night at 8.30 p. m. 26th and 27, remained in camp. 28th, returned to Raleigh into our old camp. 29th, remained in camp, with orders to march next day. 30th, at 7 a. m., marched through Raleigh, and camped for the night at 6 p. m.

May 1, marched at 5 a. m.; crossed Tar River; camped at 5 p. m.; marched twenty-three miles. 2d, broke camp at 3.30; marched at 5 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of brigade; marched twenty miles and camped. 3d, marched at 4.30 a. m.; camped on the Virginia line for the night. 4th, marched at 6 a. m.; crossed the Roanoke River; marched twenty miles and camped. 5th, moved at 5.30 a. m.; camped at 6.30 p. m. 6th, marched at 5 a. m.; passed Blacks and Whites Station on the South Side Railroad; marched eleven miles and camped. 7th, marched at 6 a. m.; crossed the Appomatox River and camped for the night; marched twenty miles. 8th, broke camp at 6 p. m.; passed Clover Hill Coal Mines and marched to Falling Creek and camped for the night; marched twenty miles. 10th, remained in camp. 11th, marched at 10 a. m.; passed through Manchester and crossed the James River into Richmond in the p. m.; passed on through on the Brook pike and camped near Brook Creek, four miles north of Richmond. 12th, marched at 6 a. m.; reaches Ashland at 6 p. m. and camped. 13th, marched at 5.30 a. m.; crossed the South Anna; camped for night near Little River. 14th, marched at 5 a. m., Twenty-ninth in advance of First Brigade; crossed the North Anna; marched eighteen miles and camped. 15th, moved at 5 a. m. on the Spotsylvania Court-House road; passed through Spotsylvania and Chancellorsville; crossed the Rappahannock at 10 p. m. and camped; marched twenty miles. 16th, moved at 4.30 a. m.; marched eighteen miles and camped. 17th, marched at 5 a. m. on the Brentsville road; reached Brentsville at 1 p. m., and camped for night; marched twelve miles. 18th, marched at 6 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and camped within two miles of Alexandria, Va.; remained in camp until the 24th, when we passed through Washington on review and went into camp on the east side of the Potomac near Bladensburg, Md., where we remained at present.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JONAS SCHOONOVER,

Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Twenty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infantry.

Capt. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps

After Johnston’s surrender, the 29th began marching to Washington, DC on April 29, arriving in Alexandria, Virginia on May 17. The men participated in the Grand Review, in Washington, from May 23 to 25.

Officials mustered the 29th Ohio out of service at Louisville, Kentucky on July 13, 1865. The men received their final pay on July 22 and 23, 1865, when they arrived at Camp Taylor in Ohio. During the 29th Regiment Ohio Voluntary Infantry’s service, at least 120 men died from wounds, including six officers. An additional 151 men died from disease or other causes, including one officer.


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"29th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 20 Sep 2019 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=995>

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"29th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved September 20, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=995

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