125th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1862 - 1865)

Also Known As: One Hundred Twenty-fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: September 18, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. They served for varying lengths of time, averaging one hundred days to three years. On October 6, 1862, eight companies of the 125th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry mustered into service at Camp Taylor, at Cleveland, Ohio. The men in the regiment were to serve three years.

The 125th remained at Camp Taylor drilling until January 3, 1863, when the regiment traveled via train to Cincinnati, Ohio. Upon reaching Cincinnati, the organization boarded river transports and sailed to Louisville, Kentucky, arriving at this location on January 8, 1863. On January 28, 1863, the regiment sailed on river transports from Louisville for Nashville, Tennessee, reaching the second location on February 7, 1863. The 125th immediately joined a Union movement to remove Confederate soldiers from Franklin, Tennessee. The regiment assumed a position in the front of the Union advance and was one of the first units to enter the city, driving the Confederates before them. The Southerners unsuccessfully tried to retake the city on March 9, 1863 and again attacked the Union forces on April 10, 1863 at the Battle of Harpeth River. In this engagement, the Union soldiers drove the Confederates from the battlefield and pursued the retreating Southerners to Columbia, Tennessee. The 125th then returned to Franklin.

On June 21, 1863, the 125th departed Franklin for Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Three days later, the regiment began a march to Hillsboro, Tennessee, reaching this location on July 3, 1863. On August 6, 1863, the organization moved towards Chattanooga, Tennessee, arriving at the Sequatchie Valley thirteen days later. The regiment stayed at this encampment until September 1, 1863, when the unit continued on the march to Chattanooga, arriving at this city on September 4, 1863. On the next day, the 125th skirmished with Confederate forces at Lookout Mountain at Chattanooga, with the Southerners evacuating the city by September 9, 1863. The regiment advanced into northern Georgia on September 10, 1863, marching via Ringgold, Rossville, and Lee & Gordon's Mills to Chickamauga, Georgia, reaching the final destination by September 18, 1863. On the following day, the Battle of Chickamauga erupted. Initially, officials held the 125th in reserve but soon ordered the regiment to support the Union left on the battle's first day. On the second day, the organization repaired a breach in the Union line, but Confederate soldiers eventually forced the regiment to withdraw to a new position. On the night of September 20, 1863, the entire defeated Union army retired from the battlefield and marched towards Chattanooga. Due to the 125th's bravery at the Battle of Chickamauga, Brigadier General Charles Woods nicknamed the regiment the "Tiger Regiment of Ohio." After the Battle of Chickamauga, the 125th's commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. 125TH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Chattanooga, Tenn., September 26, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to submit a report of the operations of my regiment since crossing the Tennessee River.

At 3 p. m., 5th instant, we marched with the brigade from Shellmound, Tenn., toward Chattanooga on the River road. The next day, p. m., we bivouacked 7 miles distant from Chattanooga. At 10 p. m., same day, we retired 2 miles to a strong position.

On the 7th, we formed a part of the force under Col. Harker, who made a reconnaissance till we developed and drew the fire of the enemy's batteries, which were in position to dispute our entrance to the city.

The skirmishers of my Company D, led by Lieut. E. P. Evans, made a gallant charge and cleared a house of a very troublesome fire of the enemy. This reconnaissance was deemed hazardous, and the colonel commanding directed me to be prepared to fight to the last man, and if surrounded to cut our way out, but nothing serious occurred and we returned without molestation.

At 1 p. m. on the 9th, we entered Chattanooga and bivouacked in its suburbs.

On the 10th, at 8 a. m., we moved toward Ringgold, Ga., bivouacked again at dusk. We countermarched, on the 11th, to the La Fayette road, and made a reconnaissance upon it. The One hundred and twenty-fifth two companies of the Sixty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, and four guns of the brigade battery were placed under my command as reserve near Rossville. The colonel commanding ordered me to be prepared to cover a retreat, should one become necessary. Suitable dispositions were made but not needed, as at 6 p. m. I received Col. Harker's report from Gordon's Mills, with orders to send a copy of it to Gen. Wood, and the original to department headquarters at Chattanooga. This was done with the utmost dispatch.

At 9 p. m. I received orders from Col. Harker to join him with my command without delay. This was accomplished by 1 a. m. of the 12th instant. The same day we were on a reconnaissance across the West Chickamauga River.

On the 13th, the colonel commanding made a reconnaissance with my regiment to the vicinity of Crawfish Spring, where we were left on detached picket duty till the a. m. of the 14th. In the p. m. of the same day we were out again on the La Fayette road.

The 15th and 16th were partially spent in making barricades along the north bank of the West Chickamauga.

At night we were ordered to be ready to march at  daylight with 60 rounds of ammunition to each man.

At daylight on the 19th, my regiment was ready for action with the following organization: Emerson Opdycke, colonel commanding; Capt. E. P. Bates, acting major; Lieut. E. G. Whitesides, adjutant; H. McHenry, surgeon; J. E. Darby, assistant surgeon; J. G. Buchanan, assistant surgeon; Freeman Collins, acting sergeant major; H. N. Steadman, commissary sergeant.

 

Command

CO

EM

A

Company A, Capt. Joseph Bruff

 2

46

48

Company B, Capt. A. Yeomans

1

43

44

Company C, Lieut. M. V. B. King

1

39

40

Company D, Capt. R. B. Stewart

2

31

33

Company E, Lieut. A. Barnes

1

39

40

Company F, Lieut. D. Humphreys

1

42

43

Company H, Lieut. Charles T. Clark

1

36

37

Company G, Lieut. William W. Cushing

1

20

21

Field and staff

6

2

8

Total

16

298

314

CO=Commissioned officer. EM=Enlisted men. A=Aggregate.

At 11 a. m. heavy firing of all arms was heard 2 or 3 miles to our left, and at 1 p. m. we were rapidly moved to the scene of conflict. Our attack was made with the Third Kentucky on our left and the Sixty-fourth Ohio on our right. The enemy seemed surprised at our appearance, and after a sharp encounter, in which I lost the first sergeant of Company A, killed, and 11 men seriously wounded, he disappeared from view, leaving 9 prisoners, one an officer, in our hands. The growth of small timber was so dense we could see but a few rods in any direction. I then received orders from Col. Harker by an aide to assume command of the Sixty-fourth Ohio, and with it and my own regiment to disperse any enemy we might find. We were then on the right of the road upon which we came out from Gordon's Mills. Firing upon us soon commenced from our front, right, and rear. I immediately ordered scouts and skirmishers out to develop our surroundings. Their deployment had only commenced when I received orders from the colonel commanding, by an aide, to bring the two regiments out and join him, which was done without serious interruption. We were then joined to the balance of the division, and in line lay upon our arms without fires, until 2 a. m. of the 20th. We then moved about 1 1/2 miles, and at an early hour were placed in position for the impending battle. Col. Barnes' brigade, of Van Cleve's division, was on our left, the Sixty-fourth Ohio in front, and the Sixty-fifth Ohio on our right. This and my own regiment formed the second line, and Col. Harker directed me to have general charge of it, and have its movements conform to those of the first line. I then directed Maj. Brown, commanding the Sixty-fifth, to maintain his relative position to the One hundred and Twenty-fifth and  to the Third Kentucky, which was in his front, as far as possible.

A sharp skirmish and artillery firing occurred to our front, when we were marched on the double-quick, by the left flank, to re-enforce Reynolds, where a heavy roar of all arms had been heard a short time. We had only come under the outskirts of the enemy's fire in our new position, when we were vigorously attacked on  our right flank and rear by superior numbers. A change of front to rear on our left, which was executed under a severe fire, placed us (the Sixty-fourth on our left, Third Kentucky on our right, the Sixty-fifth still farther to the right, the whole nearly perpendicular to Reynolds' line) facing to the south and to the enemy. The line stretched nearly across a long open field. One hundred yards to our rear was a ridge running parallel to the line, which ascended into quite a timbered hill 200 yards to my right. The enemy's line, which was 200 yards distant, reached beyond our flanks, and was advancing upon us. A severe encounter with small arms raged for a short time, when Gen. Wood in person ordered us to move forward. My regiment fixed bayonets and charged on the double-quick.

The enemy fled in confusion, and disappeared for a time. We pursued 400 yards and lay down behind a prostrate fence, which was upon another less tenable, but parallel ridge to the first one. This ridge also rose into a wooded hill 150 yards to our right. The other regiments of the brigade soon prolonged my line to the right and left. Another line of the enemy, more formidable than the first, appeared in the distance, moving upon us. The terrible splendor of this advance is beyond the reach of my pen. The whole seemed perfect and as if moved by a single mind. The musketry soon became severe and my losses heavy; the color-sergeant severely wounded, the standard shot in two the second time, and the colors riddled with balls. The regiment to my left gave way, and then that upon my right. My Company A, thinking this meant for all to retire, arose and faced to the rear, but almost instantly resumed their position. The enemy came on and themselves prolonged my line to the right, occupied the wooded hill there, and enfiladed my line with a destructive fire. Lieut. King, commanding Company C, fell dead, when Sergt. Alson C. Dilley assumed command of his company. Lieut. Barnes, commanding Company E, went down with a broken thigh, and Lieut. E. P. Evans was placed in command. Capt. Yeomans carried off a ball in his upper leg, but he remained with his company during the battle under severe pain. Numbers fell dead and more were seriously wounded, but the line was firmly maintained. Lieut. Clark coolly remarked, "They can kill us, but whip us never." Seeing no relief, I retired the regiment to the ridge in rear. In doing so, some troops passed obliquely through my right wing, which caused a little confusion there, but the ranks were closed immediately, and the crest occupied where ordered by Gen. Wood. This position was repeatedly assaulted during the day in the most terrific manner by heavy forces of Longstreet's corps, but it was triumphantly maintained until the battle was ended and till after dark, when we were ordered to retire, which we did without molestation. Late in the afternoon two pieces of the Eighteenth Ohio Battery were placed at my command. The aided much to repulse the enemy. The Forty-first Ohio and Ninth Indiana, of Gen. Hazen's brigade, Palmer's division, filed 2 rods to my rear, and added their veteran fire in repulsing the last assault.

On the 21st, we were in position near Rossville and on the 22d, we occupied our assigned position in the lines around Chattanooga.

Capt. E. P. Bates acted coolly and efficiently as acting major. My adjutant, Lieut. E. G. Whitesides, was almost indispensable to me; his gallant daring was conspicuous, and his horses was shot under him. Sergts. Alson C. Dilley, Company C; Rollin D. Barnes, Company B; H. N. Steadman, of the non-commissioned staff, and Charles C. Chapman, of Company G, distinguished themselves for cool courage and capacity to command under the severest tests. I have recommended them to the distinguished consideration of the Governor of Ohio.

My casualties were:

 

 

Killed

Seriously

Wounded

Slightly

Wounded

Missing

 


Company

CO

EM

CO

EM

CO

EM

CO

EM

A


A

-

2


-


8


-


1


-


-

11

B

-

2

1

11

-

-

-

1

15

C

-

1

-

7

-

4

-


1

13

D

-

1

-

5

-

1

-

-

7

E

-

1

1

12

-

-

-

3

 17

F

-

3

-

9

-

2

-

-

14

G

1

2

-

3

-

1

-

-

7

H

-

4

-

16

-

1

-

-

21

Total

1

16

2

71

-

10

-

5

105

CO=Commissioned officers. EM=Enlisted men. A=Aggregate.

Justice demands that the facts in favor of 4 of the missing be officially noted. Two of them had just joined from hospital; 1 had no shoes, and on crossing a burning turf, on the 19th, his feet became so burned that he and the other two, not being able to keep up, were ordered back by their officer. The fourth one was left to take care of Lieut. Barnes, which leaves the fifth

the only case without excuse in the regiment.

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

EMERSON OPDYCKE,

Col., Comdg. 125th Ohio Volunteers.

Maj. S. L. COULTER,

Acting  Assistant Adjutant-Gen., Third Brigade.

Upon reaching Chattanooga, the Union Army of the Cumberland, including the 125th, took up defensive positions, while Confederate soldiers besieged the Northerners trapped in the city. In late November 1863, the Union forces began to lift the siege. On November 25, 1863, the culminating battle--the Battle of Missionary Ridge--occurred, with the 125th helping to drive Confederate forces from the heights in front of Chattanooga. After the Battle of Chattanooga, the 125th's commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. 125TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS INFANTRY, THIRD BRIG., SECOND DIV., FOURTH ARMY CORPS, Loudon, Tennessee, January 11, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit, through Col. Opdycke, commanding demi-brigade of the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, the following report of the operations of my regiment from November 23, 1863, to include the battle of Chattanooga:

At 11 a.m., November 23, my regiment was ready for action, with the following organization: E. P. Bates, captain, commanding; Lieut. S. A. Smith, acting adjutant; H. McHenry, surgeon; Freeman Collins, acting sergeant-major; W. H. Crowell, quartermaster-sergeant; Edward Trimble, commissary sergeant.

Command

CO

EM

A

Capt. Joseph Bruff, commanding Company A

1

36

37

Sergt. R. K. Hulse, commanding Company B

-

26

26

Sergt. John A. Cannon, commanding Company C

-

31

31

Capt. R. B. Stewart, commanding Company D

1

21

22

Lieut. D. A. Stinger, commanding Company E

1

31

32

Capt. S. B. Parks, commanding Company F

1

33

34

Lieut. W. W. Cushing, commanding Company G

1

17

18

Lieut. C. T. Clark, commanding Company H

1

24

25

Capt. A Coonrod, commanding Company I

2

68

70

Field and staff

3

3

6

Total

11

250

261

CO=Commissioned officer. EM=Enlisted men. A=Aggregate.


At 1 p.m. the regiment marched with the brigade to the picket line, 50 yards to the left of the Ringgold road, fronting Missionary Ridge, and with the Sixty-fifth Ohio on my left, and followed by the Seventy-ninth Illinois, moved forward as directed by the colonel commanding in support of the skirmish line, which was immediately advanced, conformatory to simultaneous movements on the left. The enemy was driven. At 3 p.m. our line was established at his former outposts, and made a formidable breastwork before dark. At 8 p.m., as directed by the colonel commanding, my regiment moved with brigade 200 yards to the left, and rested on arms during the night.

November 24, at 8 a.m., relieved with my regiment the Sixty-fourth Ohio on picket. No firing occurred on our lines that day. November 25, was relieved from picket by Thirty-eighth Ohio at 4 a.m., and joined the brigade. About 1 p.m., as ordered, I moved my battalion 100 yards in advance of our line of works, to position in second line of battle in the demi-brigade, supporting the Sixty-fourth Ohio, with the Sixty-fifth Ohio on my left and Seventy-ninth Illinois on the right. I was then informed we were about to take the enemy's works by Col. Opdycke, who instructed me, when the order to charge should be given, "to conform to movements on the left, follow the Sixty-fourth Ohio, faithfully it, and not fail at all hazards to accomplish any work that regiment might be inadequate to perform."  The order came, and the line advanced, steadily at first, till the brigade on the left commenced an imprudent fast march, that necessitated a confirmatory double-quick movement of my command, through brush and over swampy grounds three-fourths of a mile to the enemy's works at the base of Mission Ridge. The most fearful tornado of bursting shells had now passed into a more destructive shower of grape. We held the enemy's works, filled with captives; but to remain there was destructive, to retreat dishonorable; so the advance was ordered by Col. Harker and eagerly executed by my command, in the immediate front of an open battery, near Gen. Bragg's headquarters on the crest. One-third the ascent was made when, unfortunately, the brigade on my left fell back to the works, bequeathing to us a severe cross-fire previously directed to it, and I was ordered to retire to that line. Not all my men obeyed; they merely halted and resting under cover of logs and stumps waited to be heroes in the final glorious charge, which, after a moment's needed rest, was ordered by Col. Harker, and the men again rushed to the last onset. The enemy's fire was now terrific. Capt. Bruff, of Company A, here fell with severe wound in the side, and Sergt. Freeman Thomas assumed command of his company.

Perceiving that the ridge across which my regiment extended was commanded to the very crest by a battery in front, also by those to right, and left, I directed the men to pass up the gorges on either side. About 40 men, with Capt. Parks and Lieut. Stinger, passed to the left, the balance to the right, and boldly charged on, till, foremost with those of other regiments, they stood on the strongest point of the enemy's works, masters alike of his guns and position, heroes in unsurpassed victory.

Especial praise is due to many for meritorious conduct, but to no officers more deserving than Capt. Stewart, of Company D, and Lieut. Clark, of Company H, whose cool management preserved boldest and encouraged the faltering.

With utmost satisfaction do I refer to the heroic conduct of Private John Simpson, of Company G, one of the few and faithful guards to the gallant Col. Harker in his famous artillery ride, who, spying 3 rebels escaping with a load of ammunition and arms, advanced alone, killed 1, put the others to flight, and, by order of Maj.-Gen. Sheridan, drove the team to his headquarters in Chattanooga.

Having gained the crest, my battalion was quickly formed, when I was directed to remain in present position till further orders by Gen. Sheridan.

Meantime, that part of my command under Capt. Parks had passed up to the left of the battery, and under directions of Col. Opdycke was moved forward as skirmishers, supported by the brigade and covering the road upon which the enemy had retreated, when the fight was renewed and continued till after dark. Capt. Parks reports his skirmish line to have charged upon and captured one gun that otherwise would have been hauled off.

At 8 a.m. I was ordered to join the brigade with my regiment, and soon after the brigade marched in pursuit of the routed enemy, whom we followed to his place of crossing the Chickamauga, at which point we remained till the afternoon of the 26th, when the regiment and brigade returned to Chattanooga, arriving there about dark.

 

 

K

SW

W

Company

O

EM

O

EM

O

EM

A

A

-

1

1

1

-

1

4

B

-

-

-

2

-

2

4

C

-

-

-

2

-

1

3

D

-

-

-

1

-

2

3

E

-

-

-

-

-

2

5

F

-

-

-

2

-

2

4

G

-

-

-

-

-

1

1

H

-

-

-

1

-

1

2

I

-

-

-

3

-

3

6

Total

-

2

1

14

-

15

32

 K=Killed. SW=Seriously wounded. W=Slightly wounded. O=Officers. EM=Enlisted men. A=Aggregate.

A single day was allowed me in which to prepare for a march to Knoxville, and during that time the dead were buried and the wounded comfortably provided for in hospitals.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. P. BATES,

Capt., Cmdg. 125th Ohio Volunteers.

Lieut. L. HANBACK,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

The regiment assumed the lead in the Union's pursuit of the retreating Southerners, but the organization returned to Chattanooga the following day after advancing as far as Bird's Mills.

 On November 28, 1863, officials dispatched the 125th to Knoxville, Tennessee to assist besieged Union forces. The Northerners at Knoxville lifted the siege before the regiment arrived, but the organization continued to the city. In mid December, the unit marched to Dandridge, Tennessee, arriving on December 16, 1863. The following day, the Battle of Dandridge occurred, with the 125th repulsing several Confederate assaults but still slowly retiring from the regiment's original position. That evening, the organization withdrew to Knoxville, where the regiment's last two companies finally joined the organization after officials recruited them in Ohio.

After reaching Knoxville, authorities ordered the 125th to Loudon, Tennessee, where the organization entered winter encampment. On March 21, 1864, the regiment began a series of marches through the Tennessee communities of Sweetwater, Athens, and Charleston, finally arriving at Cleveland, Tennessee on April 21, 1864.

On May 3, 1864, the 125th left Cleveland and embarked upon General William T. Sherman's Atlanta Campaign. The regiment participated in the Battles of Dalton, Resaca, and Kennesaw Mountain, as well as the other major engagements of the campaign. During the Atlanta Campaign, the 125th's commanding officer issued the following reports:

HDQRS. 125TH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864.

CAPT.: I have the honor of submitting the following report of my regiment from May 3 to May 14, 1864, at which time the command fell upon Lieut. Col. D. H. Moore, I having since then been in command of a demi-brigade or a brigade:

May 3, I moved with the brigade at 12 m. from Cleveland, Tenn., toward Dalton, Ga., with an aggregate of 500 officers and men, fully equipped for an active campaign. We bivouacked at 7.30 p. m. after a march of about fourteen miles. May 4, the march was resumed at 6 a. m. As we were near the enemy the march was slow. Halted at about seven miles from Tunnel Hill and commenced throwing up works, but after dusk we changed positions and occupied a ridge that led down to Catoosa Springs. May 5 was spent in throwing up defensive works along the crest of the ridge. May 6, we received orders to be ready to move at an time. 7th, marched at 5.30 a. m., and at 2 p. m. arrived at Tunnel Hill. 8th, at daylight I reported to brigade headquarters, when Gen. Harker showed me a map of the surrounding country, gave me a guide, and desired me to effect a lodgment on Rocky Face Ridge with my regiment, and he would support me with the remainder of the brigade. This ridge runs north and south and is exceedingly abrupt, especially the western side of it. Huge bowlders lay thickly along its steep sides, which, with the severe angle of ascent, rendered our task very difficult. I saw but one practicable place of ascent on the western side, and the eastern was commanded by the enemy, who could move a heavy force readily up at almost any place. The ridge is 500 or 600 feet high, and the crest so narrow and rocky as to render it impossible for more than four men to march abreast upon it. I was informed that the enemy held the southern portion of it in force and could re-enforce their northern posts with easy facility. But as it was an important position, a foothold was very desirable. I moved to the northern point of the ridge and made a demonstration against the enemy's skirmishers, as if I intended to pass round to the eastern side and go up there; then suddenly withdrew my men and left other portions of the brigade to continue the skirmish while, under concealment of trees, I commenced to ascend obliquely the western side. We pushed up with all possible celerity, hoping to be quick enough to effect our purpose before the enemy could ascertain and meet my intentions. We met but feeble resistance until we reached the crest (which was at 8.30 a. m.) and commenced moving south, when we met an advancing force. The skirmishers we first engaged escaped down the eastern side of the ridge, they having been cut off by the movements above indicated. The fire was severe, the rocks affording ample covering. I got a company front up and poured in several volleys and then charged and drove the enemy a third of a mile and behind a strong stone work, which was musket-proof. My left flank was greatly exposed and I had stone works thrown up to make my position as safe as possible. I then received orders from Gen.

Harker to proceed no farther until directed by him.

The Fifteenth Wisconsin, Maj. Wilson, of Gen. Willich's brigade, came up to my rear at 10.30 a. m., and I detained him to protect my rear left flank until he could be relieved by troops from our own brigade. At 11.30 a. m. I relieved him, the Sixty-fifth Ohio having reported to me. A signal station was soon established, which communicated with headquarters at Tunnel Hill. From this position we had a plain view of the enemy's works and batteries, and could see Dalton. The importance of it as a point of observation was a parent. I lost 5 men killed, 3 mortally wounded, 1 officer wounded, and 16 men. May 9, heavy skirmishing until 5.30 p. m., when an assault was made along the crest of the ridge by the flank, the Seventy-ninth Illinois as skirmishers, then the Sixty-fourth Ohio, followed, respectively, by the Third Kentucky and One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio. We could only move by the flank, and the rough surface made it impossible for troops to keep ranks even in that formation. The regiments in my front were soon in disorder, under severe musketry from behind complete protection. Numbers of my men were pushed off of rocks and fell six to ten feet. Lieut.-Col. Moore rushed ahead with about thirty brave men and got close to the enemy's works, but could not carry them. They had to remain there until darkness relieved them. Greater bravery than they exhibited could not be shown. Capt. E. P. Bates was cool and able amidst the greatest excitement and under the severest fire. Adjt. R. C. Powers behaved with conspicuous gallantry and good judgment. I lost 4 men killed and 21 wounded. Lieut.-Col. Moore was hit three times, but seemed to be miraculously preserved. Gen. Wagner's brigade relieved ours after dark, and my regiment bivouacked on a descending tongue that reached a few hundred yards perpendicularly from the eastern side of the ridge. May 10 and 11, no movements were made on the ridge. 12th, my regiment descended the ridge with the brigade and took up position on a smart rise, which seems to prolong the north end of Rocky Face. My right connected with the left of Col. Sherman's brigade. The Sixty-fourth Ohio was next on my left, facing east. We threw up defensive works. No fighting in my front. Adjt. R. C. Powers captured a lieutenant and ordnance sergeant of the Thirty-sixth Georgia Regt. 13th, enemy evacuated last night, and we pursued early in the morning. Rested in Dalton; at 12 m. moved on about eight miles south of that place and bivouacked in battle order. 14th, marched at 5.30 a. m.; about 9 a. m. our brigade was placed in reserve, and fighting soon commenced. Our brigade remained in reserve less than an hour, and it was then moved to relieve a brigade of Gen. Cox's division, of the Twenty-third Corps, then heavily engaged and nearly out of ammunition. I was the left of the front line, the Sixty-fifth Ohio on my right. We moved in line over an open field, which was exposed to a severe artillery fire. The men kept ranks almost perfectly, and we soon reached and relieved the brigade, as directed. We had tolerable breast-works, from which Gen. Cox had driven the enemy. The enemy's main works were about 300 yards to our front, and they partially enfiladed ours on the right. Gen. Harker having received a severe wound from a hostile shell, Col. Bradley assumed command and directed me to move forward to relieve what was thought to be one of Gen. Cox's regiments, which was holding a parallel crest a few rods to the front. My line passed quickly, under a severe fire of artillery and small-arms, and occupied the crest, although there were only a few skirmishers there to relieve. I soon after received a severe flesh wound in my arm, which, from the loss of blood, obliged me to turn the command over to Lieut.-Col. Moore. I remained near it, and when it was relieved retired with it. Since then I have either been in command of a demi-brigade or a brigade. My losses in this engagement were 5 men killed and 51 wounded, 6 of them mortally.

My whole losses, 2 officers wounded, 14 men killed, and 91 wounded, 10 of them mortally.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. OPDYCKE,

Col. 125th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. E. G. WHITESIDES,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

HDQRS. 125TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS, Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864.

CAPT.: I have the honor to submit the following report of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Regt. Ohio Volunteers from the 14th day of May, when I took command (Col. Opdycke having been severely wounded), to the 8th day of September, 1864, when it went into camp near Atlanta, Ga., at the close of the summer's campaign:

 

May 15, the regiment having been heavily engaged yesterday, retired to a commanding position in rear of the front line, and threw up strong earth-works. May 16, the enemy evacuated during the night. The One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at daylight, passed through Resaca at 9.30 a. m., pressed the enemy closely, and bivouacked at dark near Calhoun. May 17, recommenced pursuit at 7.30 a. m., and moved forward rapidly till 5 p. m., when a brisk skirmish ensued with the enemy's rear guard, which lasted till after dark. May 18, marched at 9 a. m. one mile to Adairsville, rested till 1 p. m. marched three miles toward Kingston, and bivouacked, the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers having captured 4 prisoners during the day. May 19, marched two and a half miles beyond Kingston, encountered the enemy in force, and rested on arms during the night. May 20, went into camp three miles southeast of Kingston, where we were allowed to remain, the men resting, washing clothes, &c., during the 21st and 22d ultimo. As every available team was ordered into the supply train, baggage was sent to the rear and the regiment was restricted to one team during the remainder of the campaign. May 23, marched at 12 m., leaving the enemy to our left, crossed the Etowah River shortly after dusk, and bivouacked two miles farther on at 8 p.m. May 24, moved at 8 a. m., crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill, passed through Stilesborough, and bivouacked at dusk, after a march of thirteen miles under a scorching sun. May 25, moved to within one and a half miles of Dallas, and bivouacked in such position as to support the Twentieth Army Corps, which had engaged the enemy in strong force, and suffered a repulse during the afternoon. May 26, Companies B, F, G, H, and K were placed on picket, and the remainder of the regiment stood to arms during the day and threw up breastworks at night. May 27, the regiment remained behind works until 7 p.m., when it was ordered on picket. May 28, on picket; a continual firing with the enemy was kept up during the day. May 29, 30, and 31, regiment lay in the trenches. From the 1st to the 4th of June, inclusive, the regiment was constantly under fire of the enemy, occupying nearly the same position in the trenches. June 5, the One hundred and twenty-fifth having been on picket during the night advanced as skirmishers at daybreak. and found that the enemy had evacuated his works. June 6, moved at 6 a. m. eight miles toward the railroad and bivouacked at 4 p. m. near Lost Mountain. June 7,8, and 9, remained in same place, men washing and resting. June 10, marched at 11 a. m. through mud and rain three miles and confronted the enemy near Pine Mountain. June 11, occupied in getting into positions, rain falling in such quantities as almost to prevent operations. June 12 and 13, active operations are suspended on account of excessive wet weather. June 14: regiment on picket, nothing of importance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works.

June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. June 18, the lines are extended, the One hundred and twenty-fifth moves a short distance to the right and fortifies. June 19, the enemy having evacuated during last night, our lines are advanced two miles, when we again encountered him at the base of Kenesaw, on the northeast side of the mountain. Heavy cannonading is opened. Lieut. Freeman Collins is killed by a fragment of shell, 2 men are wounded. Threw up strong works at night. June 20, the brigade being relieved by a brigade of the Fourteenth Army Corps, at dark the regiment marched one mile to the rear and bivouacked in open field. June 21, moved half a mile to the right, relieving Twentieth Army Corps in the trenches. At 4 p. m. advanced our lines 400 yards and fortified. June 22, regiment was in reserve line. June 23, it being ordered to advance the pickets, the One hundred and twenty-fifth was ordered to support the skirmish line; Companies B, E, and K were deployed and advanced with great determination, drove the enemy from his pits, but received such a severe fire from his main works as to be unable to hold the ground gained. Capt. Sterling Manchester and 2 men were killed, and 12 men were wounded. Strengthened our advanced works at night. June 24, remained in position as support to the picket-line. June 25 and 26, were in rear line of trenches, resting. June 27, it having been determined to charge the enemy's works to the right of Kenesaw Mountain, the Third Brigade was designated to form one of the charging columns to assault the enemy in front of works occupied by the extreme right of the Fourth Army Corps, Col. Opdycke, in charge of the skirmish line for the division, selected the One hundered and twenty-fifth for skirmishers, ordering that it should push ahead at all hazards, scaling the enemy's works with the head of the column, in case the charge was successful, or protecting the rear if repulsed. I deployed the regiment in rear of our works, at intervals of four feet, placing Maj. Bruff in charge of the right wing, while I directed the movements of the left. Between our main works and those of the enemy there was an interval of not to exceed 400 paces. Fifty paces in front, and running nearly parallel to our works, was a ravine, which was the only place between the lines where men were not exposed to fire from the enemy's main works. At the sound of the bugle, fifteen minutes before 10 a. m., the line sprung over the works and moved forward in quick time without firing. We passed the enemy's advance pits, capturing almost his entire line of pickets, and sent them to the rear in charge of wounded men, or without guard when there were not wounded men at hand, as I would not spare well men from the ranks.

As the line advanced beyond the enemy's rifle-pits it was exposed to a more withering fire, but it moved forward in splendid style till it encountered the abatis in front of his main works, when I halted and lay down to await the charging column. The head of the column no sooner reached the abatis than it, too, Was unable to stand the fire, and the men immediately threw themselves flat on the ground; all attempts to again rally them were unsuccessful, although several men struggled through the dense abatis and were cut down while climbing the outer slope of the enemy's works. There was no concerted action, and after maintaining is position fully fifteen minutes the column was forced to fall back. The One hundred and twenty-fifth retired to the pits occupied by the enemy during the morning, and held them half an hour after the column had withdrawn, and until after relieved by fresh troops. The entire loss of the regiment during the engagement amounted to 1 officer killed, 2 mortally wounded, and 8 officers more or less severely wounded; 6 men killed, 8 mortally wounded, and 33 men more or less severely wounded. June 28, 29, and 30, remained in trenches resting. July 1 and 2, remained quietly behind works. July 3, the enemy having evacuated his works during the night, the One hundred and twenty-fifth joined in the pursuit at 6 a. m. and bivouacked at five miles below Marietta near the railroad, confronting the enemy. July 4, changed position and fortified; the enemy withdrew during the night. July 5, marched at 7 a. m. and bivouacked at night near Vining's Station. July 6, 7, and 8, rested in bivouac, men washing, &c. July 9,10, and 11, moved with the division to support McCook's cavalry, which had effected a crossing of the Chattahcochee River at Roswell, twelve miles above Vining's. July 12,13, and 14, returned to Vining's Station, crossed the Chattahoochee River at Powers' Ferry, and constructed breast-works at a point two miles farther south. July 15, 16, and 17, remained quietly in camp; no enemy appeared in our immediate front. July 18, the entire command moved at 5 a. m.; the One hundred and twenty-fifth was deployed as skirmishers, and was supported by the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Ohio, and Third Kentucky Infantry. Encountered Wheeler's cavalry, dismounted, supported by a 4-gun battery. At 9 a. m. at Nancy's Creek charged him from his temporary intrenchments and drove him six miles, bivouacking early in the afternoon at Buck Head. Lost during the day 1 man killed and 5 wounded. July 19, remain in bivouac. July 20, marched at 6 a. m., crossed Peach Tree Creek at 12 m. and assisted in repulsing a severe attack of the enemy, which resulted very disastrously to him: July 21, rested in bivouac. July 22, marched at 10a. m. and drove the enemy into his intrenchments about Atlanta after severe skirmishing. Went into position late in the afternoon, and worked all night at throwing up breast-works. July 23, changed position farther to the right of Peach Tree Creek road and constructed strong breastworks.

From the 24th day of July to the 24th day of August, inclusive, occupied nearly the same position, strengthening works, doing picket duty, &c. August 25, the grand flanking movement commencing, the regiment marched all night to our right. August 26, continued the movement began last night until 4 p. m., when the regiment bivouacked for the night. August 27, 28, 29, 30, and 31, were occupied in trying to get possession of the Macon railroad between Rough and Ready Station and Jonesborough. September 1, struck the railroad three miles below Rough and Ready Station, and assisted in tearing up and burning the track between that point and Jonesborough. The Army of the Tennessee having engaged the enemy at the latter place early in the day and gained advantage over him, the Fourth Army Corps was ordered to its assistance, but arrived too late in the day to be available. The One hundred and twenty-fifth, in the front line on the extreme left, went into position at dark after slight skirmishing with scattering cavalry, extended our pickets so as to inclose a rebel hospital containing three surgeons, several nurses and attendants, and 150 rebel wounded. September 2, pursued the enemy to Lovejoy's Station, confronted him on the 3d and 4th, and marched to Atlanta on the 5th, 6th, and 7th. September 8, went into camp two miles northeast of the city near the Augusta railroad.

Casualties since May 14, 1864: Killed, commissioned officers, 5; enlisted men, 27. Wounded, commissioned officers, 9; enlisted men, 107. Aggregate, 148.

Very respectfully, yours, &c.,

D. H. MOORE,

Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Regt.

Capt. GEORGE I. WATERMAN,

A. A. A. G., Third Brig., Second Div., 4th Army Corps.

After Atlanta, Georgia fell to Union forces in early September 1864, officials dispatched the regiment in pursuit of Confederate John Bell Hood's army, which was conducting an advance into northern Alabama, northern Georgia, and central Tennessee. The 125th captured approximately eighty prisoners and two battle flags at the Union defeat at the Battle of Franklin (November 30, 1864). After the battle, General George Thomas commended the regiment's brigade commander by saying, "Colonel [Emerson] Opdycke, your brigade saved the army at Franklin, and saved Nashville."

At the Battle of Nashville (December 15 and 16, 1864), the regiment assaulted the Confederate lines on multiple occasions, helping Northern forces to drive the Rebels from the battlefield. After the battle, officers of the 125th issued the following reports:

HDQRS. 125TH OHIO VOLUNTEER, Nashville, Tenn., December 4, 1864.

CAPT.: I have the honor to report the operations of the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Volunteers from November 29 to December 1, 1864.

On the morning of November 29 the regiment was bivouacked on the north bank of Duck River, opposite Columbia. At 8 a. m., and ten minutes after receiving the order, my command marched, as directed by Col. Opdycke, the fifth regiment in the brigade and division, on the pike toward Spring Hill, distant twelve miles. At 11 a. m., having arrived within a mile of the town, the command was moved double-quick to reach the place before it should be occupied by a large cavalry force of the enemy then in sight. Our lines were formed north of the town, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio on the left of the pike and of the brigade, and as soon as formed the brigade advanced, driving back the enemy till he disappeared from our front. Soon after he was seen advancing on the Franklin pike, and, as directed by the colonel commanding, my regiment was immediately deployed and advanced, covering the pike, and successfully held the enemy in check there while other parts of the lines became more seriously engaged. A skirmish line of more than half a mile in length was thus maintained  by the regiment during the afternoon and night. Meanwhile the army and train retreated safely trough our lines toward Franklin. At daybreak the regiment joined the brigade, which was to be rear guard. The lines of retreat were formed under direction of the colonel commanding, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio in the rear line on the left of the pike. At 6 a. m. the retirement commenced and proceeded without serious interruption to Franklin, which place we reached about 2 p. m. and took a commanding position to check the advancing columns of the enemy's cavalry and infantry then in sight. At about 3 p. m. the brigade was relieved and move within a hastily constructed line of works near Carter's house, on the pike, where the men were permitted to take the first refreshments of the day. Scarcely was supper ended when sharp picket-firing heard on all sides, and the men were called to arms; they rebel battle-line soon joined their skirmishers and the fight began. With all celerity the regiments of the brigade were moved to right and left of the pike ready for use, and the front of my command uncovered; the next moment the line at the works was broken, a mass of frightened recruits and panic-stricken men case surging back, and the clash of arms, the whizzing of bullets, and the demoniac yell of an elated foe was all that could be heard, when the order came from our leader to advance my regiment, and the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio charged double-quick through and over crowds of routed men, and met the rebels at our abandoned works, and poured into them withering volleys that sent them reeling back from our lines, strewing their way with flags, dead, and wounded. I was quickly joined on the left by the gallant Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and Eighty-eighth Illinois, and on the right by the noble Thirty-sixth Illinois that added their veteran fire, which thoroughly repulsed the first fierce assault. Two guns at the right of the regiment that had been deserted by all but a single corporal, were quickly brought into action again, new barricades constructed, stragglers forced back to them, and disaster averted.

Repeated assaults were made and repulsed, each time with great loss to the enemy in killed, wounded, and prisoners. The trophies secured were 2 guns saved, 2 battle-flags and 85 prisoners captured.

I cannot select retributive language to describe the bravery evinced by the entire regiment. Officers were example and the men emulated them. Some instances deserve particular mention. Sergt. Henry Ross, of Company H, penetrated enemy's lines three times, demanded surrender, and actually conducted to our lines 40 rebel prisoners. Corpl. Joseph Wilson, Company C, was captured and subsequently made his escape with 25 rebels as prisoners. Sergeant French, Company C, in charge of a party of sharpshooters, did excellent service. Private William C. Roberts, Company, I and Theophile Ducquet, Company D, captured each a rebel battle-flag.

The casualties in the regiment were 1 officer and 1 man killed; 1 officer and 13 men severely and 1 officer and 6 men slightly wounded, and 8 men missing.

Among the killed was the lamented Capt. R. B. Stewart, of Company D, whose courage, capacity, generosity, and intellectual worth endeared him to all, and recommended him to higher position. It is due to those reported missing, to say that they are all men of true courage, and that death or severe wounds caused them to be missing.

At 11 p. m. the regiment retired a short distance from the works as support to the pickets, and at 12 crossed the Harpeth River, having brought the wounded off the field. The march was immediately resumed, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio first in the brigade, and the brigade was the first of the army to enter Nashville at 10 a. m.

December 1, 1864.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EDWARD P. BATES,

Capt., Cmdg. 125th Ohio Volunteers.

Capt. R. C. POWERS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

HDQRS. 125TH OHIO VOLUNTEERS, Near Columbia, Tenn., December 21, 1864.

CAPT.: I have the honor to report that on the morning of the 15th instant my command, simultaneous with others, moved out of the works at Nashville to attack the enemy, participating in the charge upon the enemy's position to the left of the Hillsborough pike, which we carried. Lieut. Hulse, in command of squad of skirmishers, captured one gun to the right and front of this position, which he turned upon the enemy, doing good service. On the 16th advanced upon the enemy's works to the right of the Franklin pike and charged with the line, the enemy flying in disorder.

The casualties in the command were 1 killed and 3 severely wounded. Your obedient servant,

JOSEPH BRUFF,

Maj., Cmdg. Regt.

[Capt. R. C. POWERS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.]

The organization joined the Union pursuit of the retreating Confederates, following the Southerners as far as Huntsville, Alabama, where the 125th entered winter encampment on January 6, 1865.

The 125th departed Huntsville on March 28, 1865, arriving at Knoxville two days later. The regiment quickly moved to Blue Springs, Tennessee. On April 19, 1865, the organization departed this location for Nashville, arriving here on April 30, 1865. In early June 1865, officials ordered the regiment to New Orleans, Louisiana, where the organization remained for three weeks before sailing to Texas. On September 25, 1865, officials mustered the 125th out of service in Texas and discharged the regiment's members on October 17, 1865 at Camp Chase, at Columbus, Ohio.

During its term of service, the 125th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry lost 111 men, including seven officers, to wounds. An additional 114 soldiers died from disease or accidents.

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"125th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 21 Oct 2019 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=871>

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"125th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved October 21, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=871

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