24th Ohio Independent Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery (1863 - 1865)

Also Known As: Twenty-fourth Ohio Independent Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery

Updated: August 07, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Artillery batteries formed in Ohio became known as batteries of Ohio Volunteer Artillery. They served for varying lengths of time, averaging one hundred days to three years. On August 4, 1863, the 24th Ohio Independent Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery organized at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio. The men in the battery were to serve three years. The organization was also known as Hill's Battery, named after J.L. Hill, the 24th Battery's commanding officer.

On September 22, 1863, the 24th moved to Cincinnati, where the organization performed garrison duty. Due to rumors circulating of an escape attempt at Johnson's Island, a Northern prison camp in Lake Erie, near Sandusky, Ohio, officials ordered the battery to the prison on November 10, 1863. The organization arrived the following day, and authorities placed two gun crews on the island and four more at Cedar Point on the mainland to cover the entrance to the Sandusky Bay. The 24th eventually established Camp Hill, named for the battery's commander Captain J.L. Hill, near Sandusky, where the organization's members engaged in drill. On June 9, 1864, officials ordered the battery to Kentucky to pursue Confederate cavalrymen under the command of John Hunt Morgan. Upon reaching Xenia, Ohio by train, authorities countermanded the order, and the 24th returned to Camp Hill.

The 24th departed Camp Hill for Camp Chase, at Columbus, Ohio, on August 6, 1864. Camp Chase officials feared a Confederate prisoner uprising. The rebellion did not materialize, and on August 27, 1864, the battery left for Camp Douglas, another prison camp, which was located near Chicago, Illinois. The organization performed guard duty at Camp Douglas until June 10, 1865, when authorities ordered the battery to Camp Dennison. The 24th mustered out of service at Camp Dennison on June 24, 1865. During the 24th Battery's term of service, the organization had no men killed on the battlefield and six soldiers die from disease or accidents.

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MLA Style

"24th Ohio Independent Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 21 Oct 2019 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=784>

APA Style

"24th Ohio Independent Battery of Ohio Volunteer Artillery." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved October 21, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=784

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War