66th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1861 - 1865)

Also Known As: Sixty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: July 06, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. They served for varying lengths of time, averaging one hundred days to three years. On December 17, 1861, the 66th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry mustered into service at Camp McArthur, at Urbana, Ohio. The men in the regiment were to serve three years. The members of six companies came from Champaign County; two companies originated in Delaware County; and Union and Logan Counties provided one company each.

On January 17, 1862, the 66th departed Urbana for New Creek, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). In early February 1862, the regiment participated in a campaign to Romney, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia), but Confederate forces had withdrawn from this community before the Union soldiers arrived. The 66th then established camp at the Highlands on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The regiment soon moved to Martinsburg, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia), followed by stops at Winchester, Virginia and Strasburg, Virginia. At each location, the 66th performed provost-marshal duty. The regiment also visited New market, Virginia and Harrisonburg, Virginia, before crossing the Blue Ridge Mountains and moving to Fredericksburg in eastern Virginia. At Fredericksburg, officials brigaded the 66th with the 5th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 7th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 29th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment stayed in Fredericksburg only one day before returning to the Shenandoah Valley, via Manassas to Front Royal. Confederate general Thomas Jackson's force was in possession of much of the Shenandoah Valley, and Union officials quickly ordered the 66th to advance to Port Republic. On June 9, 1862, the Battle of Port Republic occurred, with the 66th positioned on the Union left. Throughout the day, the regiment repulsed numerous Confederate assaults and served as the rearguard as the Union military retreated from the battlefield. In this engagement, the 66th had 109 men killed, wounded, or missing out of the approximately four hundred members who fought in the battle.

Following the Battle of Port Republic, the 66th retreated to the Orange and Alexandria Railroad. In July, the regiment joined the command of General John Pope at Sperryville, Virginia. On August 9, 1862, the 66th participated in the Battle of Cedar Mountain. In this Union defeat, the organization had eighty-seven men killed or wounded out of the two hundred members active in this battle. Following this engagement, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH REGT. OHIO VOL. INFTY., U.S.A., Camp near Culpeper Court-House, Va., August 11, 1862.

GENERAL: In compliance to circular, dated Headquarters Second Division, Second Corps d'Armee, Army of Virginia, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my regiment in the late action of Saturday, August 9, near Culpeper Court-House, Va.:

The regiment left camp at Culpeper Court-House, Va., in company with the remainder of the brigade, under command of Brig.-Gen. Geary; arrived on the field, and took position on the left of the Seventh Ohio, the line running, as near as can be ascertained, due north and south. Remained in that position about an hour; then ordered to move to the right and change position in rear of batteries almost perpendicular to our original front, which was done at a double-quick. Took position in rear of batteries; remained about an hour; ordered to advance; moved 200 or 300 yards and commenced firing; ordered to halt; laid down in corn field and remained in that position near an hour; ordered to advance, firing on the enemy's skirmishers, which was done. As soon as the troops on the right and left commenced falling back I ordered my regiment to fall back firing, no one being present to give any orders and no support in view. After falling back some 10 or 15 yards I again ordered the advance; advanced beyond our original line some 10 or 20 yards. This was repeated several times; again fell back firing. Upon finding out that the enemy had our range, and with grape and shell were mowing down the brave men under my command, I fell back to the woods on this side of the creek, bringing with me but about 60 men left of my entire regiment. Upon coming out I found a squall of the Fifth, Seventh, and Twenty-ninth Ohio formed, waiting for some one to give them orders what to do. I was here informed that Gen. Geary had been wounded in the early part of the engagement, and immediately reported to Maj.-Gen. Banks for instructions. Was ordered by him to take position on the right of Gen. Greene's brigade, at the edge of the timber this side of the Run (Cedar Creek); started to take position as ordered, throwing out an advance guard of 10 men, under command of Capt. Van Deman, Sixty-sixth Ohio. He advanced, throwing out his advance guard as skirmishers. Upon their arrival at the edge of the timber they were ordered to halt and deliver up their arms. At that instant my command was fired upon by a strong party concealed in the timber. My regiment of about 60 men, being in the advance, received their fire, which wounded 1 captain, 3 lieutenants, and quite a number of the enlisted men. After returning their fire back and reported the facts to Gen. Pope, commanding, who ordered me to place my men where they could rest for the night.

From the reports received by the acting adjutant of the regiment we went into the action about 250 strong. My officers and men stood throughout the engagement under a galling fire of musketry, shell, and grape, obeying every order promptly and punctually. I have the honor to inclose herewith list of killed, wounded, and missing. I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAS. CANDY,

Col. Sixty-sixth Regiment Ohio Vols., Comdg. Regiment.

Brig. Gen. GEORGE S. GREENE,

Comdg. Second Div., Second Corps d'Armee, Army of Virginia.

The regiment then joined the Army of the Potomac at Sharpsburg, Maryland and fought in the Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862. Following this engagement, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEERS, Camp near Harper's Ferry, Va., September 25, 1862.

SIR: In compliance to orders received from headquarters of First Brigade, Second Division, Second Corps, Army of Virginia, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Sixty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the late action near Sharpsburg, Md., on the 17th instant:

The regiment moved to the field of battle in column, in company with the Fifth and Seventh Ohio Volunteers (infantry), and Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, composing the First Brigade, under command of Lieut. Col. Hector Tyndale, of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania. Moving in front of a piece of woods in which the enemy were in force, and under whose fire we were placed, having 2 wounded while we were in column, I immediately deployed my regiment, and two high fences were a serious obstacle to my deploying to the left. I formed in line of battle, moving to the right. I observed that the Seventh Ohio had formed line in a similar manner, and I immediately attached my regiment on the left of the Seventh Ohio, and together we moved toward the right of the line that the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania were forming, which brought us immediately in front of a line of the enemy drawn up along a fence, in the edge of a corn-field. We immediately opened fire upon the enemy, who soon broke. We advanced, firing, in connection with the other regiments composing the First Brigade.

The retreat of this line of the enemy soon became a rout. My regiment took a number of prisoners, who were sent to the rear. The regiment moved rapidly forward and formed, with the rest f the brigade, under shelter of a small knoll, directly in front of the church on the Sharpsburg road. This regiment assisted in repulsing the several attacks made by the enemy to drive us from this position, and in their last attack I was wounded by a musket-shot along the cheek and neck, which disabled me from remaining on the field the rest of the day.

From the report of the acting adjutant of the regiment, we went into action 120 strong, and this small force acted as efficiently as it was possible for it to do. I had but two commissioned officers with me in the action, Lieuts. Smith and Yagel, both of whom escaped unhurt.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EUGENE POWELL,

Lieut.-Col. Sixty-sixth Ohio Vols., Comdg. Regiment.

Maj. O. J. CRANE,

Comdg. First Brig., Second Div., Second Corps, Army of Va.

Following the Battle of Antietam, the 66th returned to Virginia, performing guard duty at Dumfries. On December 27, 1862, General James Ewell Brown Stuart's Confederate cavalrymen attacked the regiment and the rest of its brigade at Dumfries. Outnumbered three to one, the Union soldiers managed to force the Southerners to withdraw. The 66th next fought in the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia (April 30 to May 6, 1863), helping to slow Confederate General Thomas Jackson's flank attack. Following this engagement, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following reports:

CAMP NEAR AQUIA CREEK, VA., May 8, 1863.

COL.: In compliance with instructions from headquarters First brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Army Corps, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers in the battle of Chancellorsville, Va., on May 1, 2, and 3.

The position of the regiment was on the right of the First Brigade, behind an intrenchments thrown up by the men on the night of May 1.

On Saturday we were shelled by the enemy, but held our position. About 9 a. m. a small body of the enemy's sharpshooters made a dash on us in front of the breastworks, but was repulsed.

The regiment left the intrechments on Sunday about 10 a. m., by order of Col. Charles Candy, commanding brigade, and formed in rear of the brick hospital, in our position in the division. Being ordered to reoccupy the trenches, the Sixty-sixth took its original position on the right of the brigade, being the most advanced next to the enemy. By order of Brig.-Gen. Geary, commanding division, the Sixty-sixth formed across the woods, the left of the regiment resting on the intrechments.

While in this position I received an order from Gen. Geary to advance and engage the enemy. I moved forward, throwing out skirmishers, and soon met the enemy advancing in full force. I immediately engaged them, delayed their advance for some time, and sent back intelligence of their advance. Their sharpshooters flanking on the left, we slowly fell back, halting repeatedly and maintaining the fight.

I have the honor to state that the officers and men conducted themselves with bravery, as they have done in former, engagements.

I inclose herewith a list of the killed, wounded, and missing. I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. POWELL,

Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers.

Col. CHARLES CANDY,

Cmdg. First Brig., Second Div., Twelfth Army Corps.

AQUIA CREEK, VA., May 29, 1863.

COL.: In compliance with instructions received from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Corps, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Sixty-sixth Regiment Ohio Volunteers Infantry in the late engagement at Chancellorsville, Va., on the 1st, 2d, and 3 instant:

This regiment took part in the reconnaissance from Chancellorsville in the direction of Fredericksburg on the 1st instant, and, after returning, the position of this regiment was on the right of the brigade and on the position of this regiment was on the right of the brigade and on the right of the Plank road leading from the United States Ford.

During the night of the 1st instant the regiment threw up a field fortification, connecting with the Second Brigade, Second Division, twelfth Army Corps. During the 2d instant this regiment remained at the trenches, no casualties occurring, although being subject to a continuous fire from the enemy.

I received an order on the morning of the 3d instant from Col. Candy, commanding brigade, to quit the trenches and form inky place in the division, then formed in close column by battalion in rear of Chancellorsville hospital. The First Brigade being ordered to reoccupy the trenches, I formed the regiment in its original position there. I changed front immediately afterward, by order of Col. Candy, commanding brigade, with my left resting on the trenches. While in this position I received an order from Gen. Geary, commanding division, to advance and engage the enemy, who was coming down through the woods within our intrenchments. I immediately advanced this regiment, throwing out skirmishers. I soon met the enemy's skirmishers, and, driving them back, found that the enemy was advancing in heavy force. I sent back word of the advance, and engaged them. The enemy outflanking us on both sides, I fell back slowly, making several stands and doing he utmost to withstand the onset. This regiment retired with the First Brigade to the second line of battle formed after the close of the engagement on the 3d instant.

I have to state that I had present for duty on the morning of the 2d instant 340 enlisted men and 22 commissioned officers. I have the honor to state that the officers and men manifested the same ardor and bravery that they have done in former engagements.

I inclose herewith a list of casualties.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. POWELL,

Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio Volunteers.

Col. CHARLES CANDY, Cmdg. 1st Brig., 2d Div., 12th A. C.

The Confederate victory at Chancellorsville permitted Southern General Robert E. Lee to launch his second invasion of the North, which culminated in the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania (July 1 to 3, 1863). The 66th participated in this Union victory, holding a position on the extreme right of the Northern line. Following this engagement, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report:

Battle-field, Gettysburg, Pa., July 4, 1863.

Sir: In compliance with circular dated headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Army Corps, of this date, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the engagement on the 3d instant:

Early on the morning of July 3, under orders from Col. Charles Candy, commanding First Brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Army Corps, I crossed with my regiment to the intrenchments in front of the First Corps, for the purpose of giving the enemy an enfilading fire.  With my left resting on the intrenchments and the right down the hill, we poured in a murderous fire on the enemy's flank.  After a short time I found that the enemy had posted sharpshooters at the foot of the hill, behind a fence, who were annoying us very much. I ordered my regiment to take up a sheltered position behind trees and stones, and direct their fire on the sharpshooters, whom we soon dislodged.  I then received orders to recross the intrenchments and relieve the One hundred and fiftieth New York Regt., where we remained until relieved at 9 p. m.

The officers and men all behaved well while under fire, and sustained the reputation won on former fields.

It also becomes my painful duty of reporting to you that Maj. J. G. Palmer fell, mortally wounded, while cheering on the men in our advance across the intrenchments.

The regiment lost 3 commissioned officers wounded, 14 enlisted men wounded, and 1 killed.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

E. POWELL,

Lieut. Col. Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio Vols., Comdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. Creigh,

A. A. A. G., First Brig., Second Div., Twelfth Corps.

Following the Battle of Gettysburg, the Army of the Potomac, including the 66th, advanced to the Rappahannock River in Virginia. Due to draft riots in New York, New York, officials dispatched the regiment to that city to help quell the unrest. The 66th arrived at New York on the steamship Baltic on August 29, 1863. The organization encamped on Governor's Island, remaining in New York until September 8, 1863. The regiment then went to the Rapidan River in Virginia, arriving on September 17. After just a few days, authorities transferred the 66th to the Army of the Cumberland, currently operating in the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tennessee.

At Chattanooga, the 66th helped end the Confederacy's siege of this city. On November 24, 1863, the regiment participated in the Battle of Lookout Mountain, driving the Southerners from the mountain. The following day, at the Battle of Missionary Ridge, the 66th again engaged the Southerners. The Union victory at this encounter ended the Confederate siege. The regiment participated in the Union's pursuit of the retreating Confederates, fighting in the Battle of Ringgold Gap (November 27, 1863) before returning to its camp near Chattanooga. Following this engagement, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Wauhatchie, Tennessee, December 3, 1863.

LIEUT.: In compliance with circular, dated headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twelfth Army Corps, Ringgold, Ga., November 30, 1863, I have the honor to submit the following report, viz:

On the morning of the 24th November, in connection with the rest of the Second Division, the Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio Volunteers moved to the foot of Lookout Mountain, where line of battle was formed, with this regiment on the extreme right of the second line, in which way we moved until the right became engaged at or near the enemy's camp, when it was ordered to move by the right flank up the mountain and in rear of the Third Brigade, Second Division, and were held in reserve until the works at of near the white house were taken, when the regiment was ordered to relieve the One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers, where it remained until the next morning, when it relieved the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry beyond the white house. The regiment was not engaged on Lookout Mountain, but had 5 men wounded by stray balls.

On the morning of the 25th, the regiment was ordered to march for Mission Ridge. It moved out the Rossville road, and arrived at Rossville at 3 p.m., when we were ordered into line, this regiment holding the right, in which way the regiment moved up and along the foot of the ridge, sometimes in line and again by flank, until nightfall, the regiment not firing a gun. One man wounded by premature explosion of shell.

On the morning of the 27th, upon our arrival at Ringgold, we were ordered to move up the railroad, form line and storm the ridge. The regiment was on the extreme right of the first line, in which way it advanced up the hill under a galling fire, until our right rested on the left of the Twenty-sixth Iowa Volunteers. We remained in this position until our ammunition was exhausted, when I sent word to Col. Creighton, Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, commanding brigade. He being wounded, I reported to Col. Ahl, Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, who ordered me to fall back slowly to the railroad. The regiments lost in killed 1 commissioned officer and 4 enlisted men, and 10 men wounded.

The regiment behaved very well indeed while under fire and sustained its well earned reputation on former fields.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. McCONNELL,

Capt. Company A, 66th Regt. Ohio Vol. Infty., Comdg. Regiment

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

On December 15, 1863, many of the 66th's members reenlisted and received a brief furlough to their homes in Ohio. Upon the furlough's conclusion, the regiment entered into camp at Bridgeport, Alabama, where the organization remained for three months. While at Bridgeport, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following reports:

STEVENSON, ALA., March 29, 1864.

SIR: While a party of Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers were assisting refugees to cross Tennessee River at Caperton's Ferry this afternoon, they were attacked by a party of mounted guerrillas, who fired on them, wounding 2 officers. Three of our men were on the south side of the river, and are supposed to have been captured. Nothing else of importance.

DAVID IRELAND,

Col., Cmdg. Post.

Brig.-Gen. WHIPPLE.

HDQRS. U. S. FORCES, Stevenson, Ala., March 31, 1864.

CAPT.: In reply to your communication of this date calling for a more explicit report of the wounding of 2 officers and the capture of 3 men of my command on the 29th instant, I have the honor to submit the following:

A detachment of four companies from the Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio volunteers are stationed at Caperton's Ferry, on the Tennessee River, about 4 miles from this post, at which point refugees from the south are continually crossing.

About 1 p. m. yesterday, as Capt. Morgan and Lieut. Organ, with 4 men, were on the south bank of the river assisting a refugee to ferry himself and his household goods over the river, they were fired upon by a party of mounted guerrillas, numbering about 20, who demanded their surrender. The two officers threw themselves into the bottom of the boat and pushed it into the steam, when they were again fired upon, Capt. Morgan being severely wounded in the thigh and Lieut. Organ slightly in the hand. They drifted out into the steam and escaped to the opposite bank of the river. The 4 men were a short distance above where the boat was lying, and were unable to reach it. Three of them were captured, 1 effecting his escape by hiding under the river bank, where he was found by a force of our men who were immediately thrown over the river.

Capt. Dye, Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, immediately crossed with 40 men and pursued the rebels for 3 or 4 miles, but was unable to come up with them.

The band of guerrillas was commanded by Capt. Sam. Norwood, who is well known in these parts as a bushwhacker and negro thief. In addition to the 3 Federal soldiers they captured the refugee whom our men were assisting to cross and a man by the name of Barnes, who had made himself obnoxious to them by frequently bringing information to the Union troops stationed at this ferry.

No permission was given for Capt. Morgan to cross the river, but it is to render all possible assistance to deserters and refugees desiring to escape from the rebel lines.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAVID IRELAND,

Col., Cmdg. Post.

Capt. R. H. WILBUR, A. A. A. G.

On May 3, 1864, the 66th marched from Bridgeport to Chattanooga. The regiment next embarked upon the Atlanta Campaign. Before the regiment departed Chattanooga, officials assigned the 66th to the 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 20th Corps. The regiment fought in every major engagement of the Atlanta Campaign, including the Battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Pumpkin Vine Creek, Dallas, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Culp House, Pine Mountain, Marietta, and Atlanta. During the Atlanta Campaign, the commanding officer of the 66th filed the following reports:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Atlanta, Ga., September 12, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with instructions, I have the honor to herewith transmit report of operations and movements of the Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry during the campaign commencing May 3, 1864, and ending September 4, 1864.

May 3, 1864, broke camp at Bridgeport, Ala., and marched to Shellmound. May 4, marched to eastern foot of Lookout Mountain. May 5, marched to Post Oak Church, Ga. May 6, marched to Pea Vine Church, Ga. May 7, marched to Mickle's house, Ga. May 8, marched to Mill Creek Gap, where Capt. McConnell with Companies A, F, and D were detached and ordered to report to Gen. Butterfield, commanding Third Division. This regiment, together with the Fifth Ohio and One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, all under command of Col. Patrick, of the Fifth Ohio, were ordered to support the artillery. After taking up position in rear of the artillery, I was ordered to report with my regiment to Gen. Geary, commanding Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, who was at that time with the division up the hill and engaged with the enemy. After reporting to the general, I was ordered to take up a position in the rear and left of the First Brigade, to cover our left flank. Then the troops fell back. I was ordered to place my regiment on picket at the foot of the hill, and guard the approaches of our camp; no casualties to report. May 9, relieved from picket by a regiment from the Third Brigade, and joined the brigade. Worked all night throwing up works against any attack the enemy might make. May 10 and 11, still in camp. May 12, moved for Snake Creek Gap, which we reached at 3 p. m., and went into camp. May 13, marched for the forks of the Snake Creek Gap and Resaca road, Calhoun and Dalton road, and formed line to the right of, and right angles to, the last-named road and threw up intrenchments. May 14, 3 p. m., moved to the extreme left of the line, to a point on the Dalton and Resaca road. May 15, formed line on the right of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers and in the third line, and advanced on the enemy. After arriving close to the enemy, we were ordered to lie down in a ravine, where we remained until dark, when I was ordered to move in front of the temporary works and occupy a ridge running at right angles to crest fortified by the Third Brigade and fortify, which I did. Casualties, 3 men slightly wounded. May 16, the enemy having evacuated during the night and in full retreat toward the Etowah River, we followed, going into camp on the south side of the Coosawattee River, at McClures Ford. May 17, marched to the forks of the Calhoun and Adairsville road. May 18, marched to north side of Gravelly Ridge. May 19, marched to near Cassville, Ga., and encamped until the 23d, when marched to south side of Etowah River. May 24, marched to Burnt Hickory, Ga. May 25, moved at daylight and crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, when our advance met that of the enemy. We immediately formed in line, my right on the right of the brigade, throwing forward skirmishers, and advanced the line about half a mile, driving the enemy, when we were ordered to halt in a ravine. We lay here a short time, when we were ordered to fall back a short distance and occupy the crest in our rear; threw up temporary works, leaving Company A on the line of skirmishers under command of Col. Flynn, of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. We lay here until 5 p. m., when we were ordered to advance and relieve the Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, that was then heavily engaged. We moved forward, with the One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers on our left and the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers on our right. We advanced about one mile and found the Third Brigade, which we were ordered to relieve. Night, coming on, we were ordered to halt in a ravine close to the enemy's line, under a galling fire. May 26, relieved the Fifth Ohio in front line of works, which we strengthened; ordered to keep up a fire all night to cover two pieces of artillery that the enemy had left in front of their line of works. May 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, and June 1, remained in same position, skirmishing all the time.

June 2, moved to the extreme left and bivouacked for the night in rear of the Twenty-third Corps; remained here until June 6; marched to Acworth and Big Shanty road and went into camp. June 7, received orders to report to Lieut.-Col. Le Duc as guard for supply train to Cartersville and return. June 8 to 12, guard to supply train. June 13, returned to camp. June 14, marched to near Pine Knob. June 15, the enemy having fallen back and evacuated Pine Knob; we advanced with the rest of the brigade about one mile and formed line of battle, resting in line until 5 p. m., when we were ordered to advance this regiment in second line and to left of Fifth Ohio; after advancing a short distance encountered the enemy in force. We advanced, driving them within their works, which were found to be too strong to assault, and we were ordered to lie down in line under cover of a hill. After night the regiment was ordered to throw up works on the crest of the hill. June 16, relieved the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers and Twenty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry in front of the enemy, and skirmished with them all day. June 17, the enemy evacuated during the night, and we moved two miles and were held in reserve. June 18, moved forward about a mile and a half and threw up works. June 20, relieved by a regiment of the Fourth Corps and moved to the right and went on picket. June 21, threw up works in front of position; slight skirmishing. June 22, advanced about three-quarters of a mile and threw up works. June 23 to 26, remained in camp. June 27, ordered to advance with the rest of the brigade; advanced about one mile, driving the enemy; halted in the woods and fortified; after dark ordered to move forward and join the Fifth Ohio on the right. Remained here until June 29, 1864, when we were relieved by the Fourteenth Corps and moved to the right and relieved the Twenty-third Corps. June 30, in the trenches on the Marietta and Powder Springs road.

July 1, relieved by the One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and moved to the right and rear, in second line of works. July 3, the enemy evacuated during the night; ordered to move forward, capturing a large number of his rear guard. Pushing him some four or five miles, he was found intrenching. After forming line we, with the rest of brigade, were thrown in reserve. July 4, remained in camp. July 5, advanced about five miles. July 7, moved camp, right resting on Nickajack Creek. July 8 to 17, remained in camp. July 17, marched to Pace's Ferry, Chattahoochee River, Ga., as guard to division ordnance train. July 18, crossed the river and joined the brigade. Marched to near the fork of Atlanta and Buck Head road and threw up works. July 19, advanced and crossed Peach Tree Creek; threw up works. July 20, advanced and commenced fortifying; about 4 p. m. were attacked in front and right flank, and receiving orders from Capt. Elliott, assistant adjutant-general, Second Division, fell back to second line of works; reformed, and again advanced, and took up position on the right of the brigade. July 21, remained in camp. July 22, advanced to within two miles of Atlanta and fortified. July 23 to August 25, remained in trenches. August 25, moved to Pace's Ferry, Chattahoochee River. September 4, marched to Atlanta and are now doing duty in the city.

THOS. McCONNELL,

Capt. Co. A, Sixty-sixth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VETERAN VOL. INFANTRY, In the Field, Ga., May 17, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with instructions from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I have the honor to report the part taken by this regiment in the action of Mill Creek Gap, May 8, 1864.

I was ordered by Col. J. H. Patrick, commanding detachment of First Brigade, to support two sections of a battery which had taken position in front of the gap. I soon after received orders to report to Gen. Geary, commanding division, who was then attacking the enemy in the gap. I immediately reported to Gen. Geary, who ordered me to take position covering the main road through the gap, to prevent a flank movement by the enemy; while in this position I received orders from Col. Candy to return down the mountain and place my regiment on picket at its base. I have no casualties to report.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. POWELL,

Lieut. Col. Sixty-sixth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VETERAN VOL. INFANTRY, Cassville, Ga., May 22, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with instructions received this day from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I have the honor to report the part taken by this regiment in the attack on the enemy's works near Resaca on the 15th instant.

This regiment moved forward to the attack in the second line of battle formed by the First Brigade, Second Division, being on the left of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment was halted soon after crossing the wagon road in front of a commanding height that the enemy held, on which they had an earth-work and four gulls. During the evening I received orders from Col. Candy to throw up a line of rifle-pits in an open field in advance of our main line of defense, this being done for the occupancy of a commanding knoll directly in our front. I completed this work during the night, although fired upon by the enemy's pickets. I have to report but 2 men slightly wounded.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully,

E. POWELL,

Lieut. Col. Sixty-sixth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VETERAN VOL. INFANTRY In the Field, Ga., June 13, 1864.

LIEUT.: I have the honor to report the part taken by this regiment since the 25th ultimo.

This regiment was moving on the 25th ultimo, being third in line of march. Soon after passing Pumpkin Vine Creek, the head of the column being fired upon, I was ordered to form line of battle on the right of the road. I immediately formed line, and received orders to advance. I was the extreme right of the brigade. I soon met the enemy and was engaged and driven back. I then received orders to halt and throw up temporary breast-works and await orders. About 6 o'clock same evening I received orders to advance to the support of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, then engaged, my position in line of battle being second from the right of brigade. While advancing I received orders from Col. Candy, commanding brigade, to advance and relieve the front line of battle of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Although I advanced to the front, the darkness by this time was so intense that the order could not be carried out. I then waited where I was until morning; then received orders to take position in rear, under cover of a ridge, and wait orders. The casualties during the 25th were 3 killed and 9 wounded. On the afternoon of the 26th I received orders to relieve the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, then in the intrenchments on the left of the road. During my tour of duty I had 1 killed and 4 wounded. I was relieved by the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and ordered into a sheltered position behind a ridge, a short distance in rear of intrenchments. While here I had 2 officers and 1 man wounded. I relieved the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry on the evening of the 29th. During the night the enemy made quite a spirited attack on our lines, but was repulsed; lost 3 men wounded. Lost 1 man wounded on the 30th. I was relieved on the 30th by the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry and took a position in ravine in rear of intrenchments.

On June 1 I had 2 men wounded. I was ordered on the evening of the 1st to report with my regiment for fatigue duty and build breast-works about seventy-five yards in advance of those now held by the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. This work was so nearly completed that the infantry occupied it that morning. I received orders on the 2d instant to march to this place.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EUGENE POWELL,

Lieut. Col. Sixty-sixth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Comdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

Following Atlanta, Georgia's capture by Sherman's army, the 66th performed garrison duty in the city until  for approximately two months, before officials ordered the regiment to join Sherman's march to the Sea. The campaign was uneventful for the regiment until reaching Savannah, Georgia, where Confederate gunboats shelled the 66th. Following the March to the Sea, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH Regt. OHIO VET. VOL. INFANTRY, Savannah, Ga., December 26, 1864.

LIEUT.: In compliance with circular from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this regiment in the campaign ending on the 21st instant:

This regiment broke camp on the 4th of September, 1864, on the Chattahoochee River, and moved to the city of Atlanta same day and went into camp in the enemy's outer line of works, with right resting near Marietta railroad. The 5th of September received orders to report to Col. Beckwith, commissary of subsistence, Military Division of the Mississippi, for duty as supply guard, where we remained until the morning of the 15th of November, 1864, when, with the First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, we started on the campaign just ended. Nothing transpired of note during the campaign until the 11th of December, 1864, when we reached the enemy's line of works, three miles and a half northeast of the city. Here we went into line, this regiment on the right of brigade. Have no casualties to report until the night of 19th, when I had 3 men killed and 3 wounded. We remained in line until the 21st, when we entered the city and are now encamped in Chippewa Square.

Casualties: Killed-Privates S. G. Johnson, Company A; Joseph Powell, Company B; John H. Atkinson, Company D. Wounded-Corpl. E. Kyle and Private I. Wood, Company E, and Private S. Keltner, Company I.

I have the honor to be, lieutenant, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

EUGENE POWELL,

Lieut. Col. Sixty-sixth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

After Savannah's capture by Union forces, the regiment participated in the Carolinas Campaign of 1865. During the Carolinas Campaign, the commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Near Goldsborough, N. C., April 2, 1865.

LIEUT.: In compliance with instructions received from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I have the honor to report the part taken by this regiment in the campaign from Savannah, Ga., to this place:

In compliance to orders the regiment broke camp at Savannah, Ga., on the morning of January 27, 1865, and took its place in the line of march in the First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps.

This regiment performed the varied services required of it and it was not detached from the brigade until the [12th] day of February, 1865, when the enemy having taken position disputing the crossing at the North Branch of the Edisto, I received orders from Bvt. Brig. Gen. Ario Pardee, jr., commanding First Brigade, to report with my regiment to Bvt. Maj. Gen. J. W. Geary, commanding Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps. I received orders from Gen. Geary to cross the North Branch of the Edisto at a bridge two miles above the crossing, then being held by the enemy, and guard the bridge and hold the crossing and await orders, which duty I performed. On the morning of February 13 I received orders from Brevet Brig.-Gen. Pardee to return with my regiment and rejoin his command, which had crossed the North Edisto at the contested crossing. I rejoined the brigade and performed the duties assigned me, guarding the portion of the wagon train assigned me. On the night of February 18, after the Twentieth Army Corps had crossed Lumber River, I received orders from Brevet Brig.-Gen. Pardee to return with my regiment and effectually destroy the bridge on which this corps had crossed that river. I returned to the bridge and effectually destroyed it and rejoined the brigade that night. This regiment reached this place on the 24th instant. I had eight men missing during the campaign.

I am, lieutenant, very respectfully,

EUGENE POWELL,

Lieut. Col. Sixty-sixth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty., Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

Upon the war's conclusion, the regiment marched to Washington, DC, via Richmond, Virginia. After participating in the Grand Review, the organization soon traveled to Columbus, Ohio, mustering out of service on July 19, 1865. The commanding officer of the 66th issued the following report regarding the regiment's actions during the organization's last months of duty:

HDQRS. SIXTY-SIXTH OHIO VETERAN VOL. INFANTRY, Near Bladensburg, Md., May 31, 1865.

CAPT.: In compliance with instructions received from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Sixty-sixth Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry since leaving Richmond May 11, 1865, at which time I assumed command of the regiment--I have no date in my possession from which to make a report of the operations since leaving Goldsborough, N. C., up to the date of assuming command:

May 11, broke camp at 9 a. m.; passed through the village of Manchester across the James River and through the city of Richmond; camped near Brook Creek. May 12, moved at 6.30 a. m., crossing Brook Creek; camped at Ashland Station. May 13, moved at 5.30 a. m.; crossed South Anna River; marched North Anna River; marched sixteen miles; camped. May 15, moved at 5 a. m.; passed through Spotsylvania and through the battle-field of that place, also over the battle-field of Chancellorsville of May 1, 2, and 3, 1863; crossed the Rappahannock River and camped. May 16, moved at 5 a. m.; marched about twenty miles; camped about four miles from Catlett's Station, Va.

May 17, moved about 5 a. m.; marched about fifteen miles; camped at 1 p. m. near Brentsville. May 18, moved about 10 a. m.; crossed Bull Run; camped near Fairfax Station. May 19, moved at 6.30 a. m.; passed through Fairfax Station and camped at Elliott's [Cloud's] Mills, near Alexandria, Va. May 20, in camp. May 21, in camp. May 22, in camp. May 23, order received for review. May 24, left camp about 7.30 a. m.; crossed the Potomac River via Long Bridge, passing around the capitol in column by companies right in front, down Pennsylvania avenue; marched in review; passed the reviewing stand and thence out to camp; about five miles from city, near Bladensburg, Md.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO T. MITCHELL,

Lieut.-Col., Cmdg.

Capt. A. H. W. CREIGH,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

During the 66th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry's term of service, 101 men, including five officers, died on the battlefield. An additional 144 men, including one officer, succumbed to disease or accidents.

 

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"66th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 17 Sep 2019 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=662>

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"66th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved September 17, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=662

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