183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Also Known As: One Hundred Eighty-third Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: January 17, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. From October 10, 1864 and November 18, 1864, the 183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry organized at Camp Dennison near Cincinnati, Ohio. Most enlistees came from Cincinnati, while one additional company consisted of men from Warren County, Ohio, and a final company originated in Logan County, Ohio. Approximately one-half of the recruits were of German birth or descent. The men in the regiment were to serve a one-year term of enlistment.

On November 19, 1864, authorities dispatched the 183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry to Columbia, Tennessee, with the soldiers arriving on November 28. At Columbia, the regiment joined the Army of the Ohio. The next day, the 183rd Regiment participated in the Battle of Spring Hill, guarding the main road that Union forces used to retreat from the battlefield. At the Battle of Franklin, which occurred on November 30, 1864, the regiment held a position in the center of the Union line and drove back several Confederate assaults. While the Northerners won the battle, they withdrew the night of November 30, to Nashville, Tennessee. On December 15 and 16, the Battle of Nashville occurred, with the Union military driving the Confederate troops from central Tennessee. The 183rd Regiment suffered over one hundred combined casualties at the Battles of Franklin and Nashville.

Colonel G.W. Hoge and Captain W.F. Scott filed the following reports after the Battle of Nashville:

Report of Capt. William F. Scott, One hundred and eighty-third Ohio

Infantry, of operations November 29-30, 1864.

HDQRS. 183d REGT. OHIO VOLUNTEERS,

Nashville, Tenn., December 9, 1864.

SIR: I have respectfully to present the following as the report of the

operations of my command since its removal from Columbia, Tenn., 29th

of November, 1864:

Left Columbia at 12 m. and marched to Spring Hill, a distance of nine

miles. Were posted with Forty-fourth Missouri Volunteers one mile from

town, where we lay on arms till 2 a.m., when we took up our line of march

for Franklin, Tenn., a distance of nine miles. Arrived at 12 m. and at 4 p.m.

were attacked by the rebel army under Gen. Hood. Were engaged till 2

a.m. of Thursday, when we crossed the Harpeth River and marched to

Nashville, a distance of eighteen miles. Were posted in intrenchments

immediately to the left of Fort Negley, where the command now lies.

A list of the killed, wounded, and missing is as follows.

Very respectfully,

W. F. SCOTT,

Capt., Cmdg. 183d Ohio Volunteers.

Lieut. J. B. McLOE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Report of Col. George W. Hoge, One hundred and eighty-third Ohio Infantry,

of operations December 15-16, 1864.

HDQRS. ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-THIRD OHIO VOLUNTEERS,

In the Field, December 22, 1864.

SIR: I have respectfully to report the operations of my command (the One

hundred and eighty-third Ohio Volunteers) on the 15th and 16th instant, near

Nashville, Tenn., as follows:

Under direction of Col. Mehringer, commanding the brigade, on the 15th

I moved my command with the brigade from its position near Fort Negley,

and in the engagement that evening between the brigade and the enemy I

formed the right of the brigade line of battle, and aided in the repulse of the

enemy. The officers and men behaved gallantly in this, the second battle in

which the regiment has been engaged within thirty days from its

organization. Two enlisted men were killed, and Capt. Daniel Gusweiler

a highly meritorious officer, and 4 enlisted men wounded. Soon after the

engagement I moved my command with the brigade toward the left, and

again formed the right of the brigade line of battle, my right connecting with

battery; threw up rifle-pits before morning, and remained in them till I

moved forward with the brigade in the final advance in pursuit of the enemy

in the evening of the 16th.

I take pleasure in bearing testimony to the fact that much of the success in

the engagement of the 15th instant is due to the quick promptness of Col.

Mehringer, commanding the brigade, in selecting a position and changing the

front of the brigade so as to meet the rapid and unexpected advance of the

enemy.

I append a nominal list of casualties as directed.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. W. HOGE,

Col., Cmdg. 183d Ohio Volunteers.

Lieut. VAN DEURSEN,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

Following the Battle of Nashville, the 183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry advanced with the Army of the Ohio to Clifton, Tennessee. Authorities soon dispatched the regiment to the Eastern Theater. The soldiers traveled through Cincinnati, Ohio, Washington, DC, Fort Fisher, North Carolina, Wilmington, North Carolina, Kinston, North Carolina, and finally to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where it joined William T. Sherman's army in the Department of North Carolina. The 183rd's men were present for Confederate General Joseph Johnston's surrender, which effectively brought the Civil War to a conclusion. The 183rd then performed garrison duty at Salisbury, North Carolina, where, in June 1865, an additional two hundred enlisted soldiers and four officers from the 50th, the 100th, the 103rd, the 104th, the 111th, and the 118th Regiments Ohio Volunteer Infantry joined the regiment. On July 17, 1865, authorities mustered the 183rd out of service at Salisbury. The regiment then traveled to Columbus, Ohio, where officials discharged the 183rd on July 27, 1865.

During its time of service, the 183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry lost twenty-four men, including two officers, killed on the battlefield. Many more men were wounded, and an additional fifty-nine soldiers, including two officers, succumbed to disease or accidents.

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"183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2021, Ohio Civil War Central. 20 Sep 2021 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=311>

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"183rd Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2021) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved September 20, 2021, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=311

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