189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Also Known As: One Hundred Eighty-ninth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: January 14, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. On March 5, 1865, the 189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry organized at Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio. The men in the regiment were to serve a one-year term of enlistment. Most enlistees came from Cincinnati, Ohio, Dayton, Ohio, Georgetown, Ohio, Toledo, Ohio, Marietta, Ohio, Hillsboro, Ohio, and from Tuscarawas County, Ohio.

On March 7, 1865, authorities dispatched the 189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry to Huntsville, Alabama via Nashville, Tennessee, where it joined the Army of the Ohio and the Army of the Cumberland. The regiment arrived in Huntsville on March 17, 1865, where most of the men were assigned to guard the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. While serving in this capacity, one man in the regiment was killed in a skirmish with Confederate forces. On June 20, 1865, the 189th Regiment ended its guard duty of the railroad and consolidated together at Huntsville. The soldiers remained in Huntsville on garrison duty until September 25, 1865, when officials ordered the regiment to Nashville. At Nashville, on September 28, 1865, the regiment mustered out of the military. The men returned to Camp Chase in Columbus, where authorities officially discharged the soldiers.

Unfortunately for the soldiers, the Civil War ended a few weeks after the regiment’s formation on March 5, 1865, preventing the soldiers of the 189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry from seeing any major combat in the American Civil War. The regiment did lose one soldier killed in action and another forty-eight men due to disease or accidents. Despite not engaging in combat as the 189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, many of the regiment’s enlisted men had served in other regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry earlier in the war.

 

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"189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 14 Oct 2019 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=252>

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"189th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved October 14, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=252

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