5th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Three Years Service) (1861-1865)

Also Known As: Fifth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Three Years Service)

Updated: February 17, 2014

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Soldiers of Ohio infantry regiments served the Union for varying lengths of time, ranging from one hundred days to three years. One of the three-year regiments was the 5th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment mustered into service at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 20, 1861. The 5th Regiment had previously organized for three months service, but officials requested that the regiment's members reenlist for three years service. Every soldier reenlisted in the new 5th Ohio.

On July 10, 1861, the 5th Ohio departed Camp Dennison for western Virginia, reaching Clarksburg, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia) by July 12. On July 14, 1861, the regiment boarded railroad cars for Oakland in present-day West Virginia. At this community, the organization joined a Union force in pursuit of Confederate General Richard Garnett's command but failed to intercept the Southerners. The 5th returned to Oakland and entered camp. The regiment then moved to Parkersburg, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). On August 5, 1861, the 5th advanced from Parkersburg to Buckhannon in present-day West Virginia. The organization remained encamped at this community until November 3, 1861, when the regiment first moved to New Creek and then to Romney, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia), reaching this last location on November 7.

On January 6, 1862, a Union force, including the 5th, advanced upon a Confederate position at Blue's Gap, sixteen miles from Romney. On the following morning, the Northerners attacked the enemy soldiers, driving the Southerners from the field. After this Union victory, the regiment returned to camp at Romney. On January 10, 1862, the 5th marched to Patterson Creek and then to New Creek in present-day West Virginia, where the organization entered camp. While at New Creek, the organization participated in several expeditions in the surrounding countryside, seeking enemy soldiers and forage. On February 13, 1862, the 5th returned to Patterson Creek and, on that same day, with the 8th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry and a detachment of cavalry, skirmished with enemy cavalry at Bloomery Furnace, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). The regiment entered camp at Pawpaw on the following day.

On March 18, 1862, the 5th advanced with a Union force under the command of General James Shields to Strasburg, Virginia, where the Northerners skirmished with enemy soldiers. The Southerners withdrew, with the Union soldiers in pursuit. Upon reaching Mount Jackson, Virginia, the Northern force ended the chase and marched to Winchester, Virginia, arriving at this location on March 20, 1862. Three days later, the 5th advanced towards Kernstown, where the regiment participated in the Battle of Winchester. For much of the engagement, the organization supported Daum’s Indiana artillery battery, but late in the afternoon, Companies A, B, C, D, and E advanced against the Confederate line with the 84th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry. The Pennsylvanians gave way, prompting the 5th’s brigade commander to conclude that the Northerners had lost the battle. The Ohio regiment held its ground, and the brigade commander declared, “No, thank God; the brave Fifth Ohio is still standing its ground and holding the Rebels.” Union reinforcements soon came up, allowing the Northerners to drive the Confederates from the field. In this Northern victory, the 5th had forty-seven men killed or wounded.

The Northern force, including the 5th, next advanced to Strasburg, Virginia, then to Woodstock, Virginia, and finally to Edinburg, Virginia, where the regiment entered camp along the Shenandoah River. A burnt bridge and General Turner Ashby’s Confederate cavalry prevented the Union troops from advancing across the river. The Northern force conducted several expeditions throughout the Shenandoah Valley, before encamping in the vicinity of New Market, Virginia. On May 3, 1862, the Union units, including the 5th advanced to Harrisonburg, Virginia. By May 12, 1862, the Northerners had arrived at Falmouth, Virginia, remaining at this community until May 25, 1862, when the men proceeded to Front Royal, Virginia. On June 8, 1862, the Union troopers arrived at Port Republic. On the next day, the Battle of Port Republic erupted. The 5th stormed the Confederate line, forcing the Southerners back and capturing one enemy artillery piece. The enemy regrouped and forced the Northerners to withdraw from the battlefield. The 5th served as the Union’s rearguard in the withdrawal and lost 185 men, whom the Confederates captured. The regiment also had an additional fifty-nine men killed or wounded.

The retreating Northerners entered camp at Luray, Virginia. Eleven days later, the 5th marched towards Bristow Station, Virginia, arriving at this community on June 24, 1862. The organization spent the next five weeks marching throughout western and northern Virginia in search of enemy troops. The regiment finally received a few days of rest at Alexandria, Virginia, on the outskirts of Washington, DC. On July 25, 1862, the 5th boarded railroad cars to Warrenton, Virginia. Six days later, the organization moved to Little Washington, Virginia, before advancing to Culpepper Court House, with the Union’s Army of Virginia, by August 9, 1862. ON that same day the army, including the 5th moved to Cedar Mountain, Virginia, where Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson's command held a strong position. The Northerners attacked in mid-afternoon, with the 5th briefly engaging the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. The regiment entered the Battle of Cedar Mountain with 275 men available for duty and had eighteen soldiers killed, 102 more wounded, and two missing in the engagement. After the battle, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following reports:

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS, In the Field, August 11, 1862.

SIR: We left Culpeper about 9 a.m. Saturday (9th), and reached the field of action, 8 miles distant, about 2 p.m.; took position on the left; stacked arms and rested; were shortly afterward ordered to support a battery, which was in position in the center. After about an hour were ordered to advance, taking about 300 men into the engagement. While advancing we passed the Twelfth Regulars lying in a ravine, and only about 150 came out at the close of the fight, which was about dark. We had 1 field officer, 13 line officers, and 95 men killed and wounded. Respectfully, yours,

JNO. H. PATRICK, Lieut. Col., Comdg. Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Col. CANDY, Sixty-sixth Ohio Vols., Comdg. First Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, April 10, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with orders from the general commanding division I have the honor to forward the official report of the part taken by my command in the battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862:

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH REGIMENT OHIO VOLUNTEERS, Culpeper, Va., August 13, 1862.

In obedience to orders from brigade headquarters I have the honor to transmit a record concerning our action in battle near Culpeper, Va., August 9, 1862:

We left Culpeper Saturday morning, the 8th instant, and marched a distance of about 8 miles, and arrived at the scene of action about 2 o'clock. We halted in front of the enemy's right, stacked arms, and rested about an hour. In the mean time the artillery had opened fire on both sides, and I think that our artillery opened the fire. We were then ordered by Gen. Geary to support a battery which was in position on our center. On arriving there our brigade, or rather that part comprising Gen. Tyler's old brigade (the other part, consisting of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania, had left on the road), was divided, the Sixty-sixth and Seventh Ohio formed the first line of support, the Fifth and Twenty-ninth Ohio the second, 50 paces in the rear. We were ordered to advanced and gained equal distance in front.

We lay there until about 6 o'clock, having been shelled briskly from the commencement up to that time. The infantry were then ordered to advance. We kept advancing until we crossed a corn field. Our front was then clear, the troops in front having flanked to the right in advancing through the corn field. There was a road or ravine where we found a regiment of regulars (the Twelfth, I believe), all lying down. I tried to get them to advance. Our regiment called them cowards, and walked over them. After leaving the corn field we received the first round of grape and canister. We advanced farther until we reached a small mound. By this time we were the only regiment holding the open field, the others having flanked to the right that were on our right, and the regiment that came up on our left, after we had advanced through the corn field, only fired one volley, and retired immediately, the officer commanding leading them off the field.

The enemy by this time had been forced to retire, and if we had been re-enforced we would have driven them from the field. From some unexplained reason we were left to the kind mercy of the enemy, who seemed to know their business, and brought another brigade into action against us, no doubt with the intention of making a finish of the few brave men remaining on the field. We went into action with about 275 men, and lost in killed, wounded, and missing 122.

Respectfully submitted.

JNO. H. PATRICK, Col. Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. THOMAS H. ELLIOTT, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Division, Twelfth Army Corps.

The Northerners slowly withdrew to northern Virginia to the vicinity of Washington. The 5th remained in the defenses of Washington until early September 1862, when the organization joined the Army of the Potomac's pursuit of the Confederacy's Army of Northern Virginia, which had launched an invasion of Maryland. The two armies engaged each other several times on this advance, but the 5th only participated in the Battle of Antietam. The regiment engaged enemy forces in hand-to-hand combat, slowly driving the Southerners back on the Confederate right. Enemy reinforcements caused the 5th to eventually relinquish the ground. Despite this setback, the Union army won the battle. In the engagement, the 5th had fifty-four men killed or wounded out of 180 available for duty. After the battle, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report:

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Loudoun Heights, Va., September 24, 1862.

On the morning of the 17th, at 6 o'clock a. m., the Fifth Ohio Regiment, commanded by Maj. John Collins, was ordered to advance toward the enemy on the right., The proceeded in column by divisions until arriving within short distance of the enemy, when we deployed to the right of the Twenty-eighty Pennsylvania, of the same brigade, thus forming the right center, two Ohio regiments being deployed still farther to our right. Our regiment then moved forward to the woods occupied by the rebels, and after a short but severe contest, succeeded in driving them before us. From the woods the enemy retired to a corn-field, followed by us, and while in the corn our regiment engaged a Georgia regiment in a hand-to-hand combat, using clubbed guns, a portion of the men having no bayonet. The enemy at this point was severely punished. After a short resistance, the enemy again gave way, and, being closely pursued, sustained great loss. We followed the retreating foe through the corn into an open field beyond, where, our men being out of ammunition, we halted behind the brow of a hill until the cartridge-boxes of the men were replenish. We then advanced about 50 yards farther, at which time the enemy were observed coming toward us. Our regiment laid down until they approached quite near, when they suddenly raised and discharged a volley into their lines which caused them to retreat in confusion. We followed them, driving them through the field into the woods in rear, and out of the woods into the corn still farther beyond. The regiment at this time was so reduced, from wounds and other causes, as to be unable to pursue farther.

About the center of the woods we took a position which we held until again out of ammunition, when, owing to the retreat of a regiment on our right, caused by the advance of a greatly superior force of rebels, we were compelled, at about 1 o'clock p. m., to retire from our position.

 It is no flattery to say that officers and men did their duty bravely during the whole of the six hours' fire to which they were subjected. Very respectfully,

JOHN COLLINS, Maj., Commanding Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Maj. O. J. CRANE.

Following the battle of Antietam, the 5th advanced into Virginia. In mid-December 1862, the regiment advanced towards Fredericksburg, Virginia, but officials quickly countermanded the order, sending the organization to Dumfries, Virginia, where the 5th entered winter encampment. In late December 1862, Confederate General James Ewell Brown Stuart's cavalry attacked Dumfries, but the 5th relatively easily repulsed the assault.

On April 20, 1863, the 5th broke camp and joined the Army of the Potomac's advance to Chancellorsville, Virginia. From April 30 to May 6, 1863, the Battle of Chancellorsville raged. The 5th spent most of the battle on the Union right, unsuccessfully attempting to repulse a Confederate assault on the Northerners’ flank. Following this Union defeat, the Northern army retreated. After the battle, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report:

[MAY] --, 1863.

SIR: The following is a report of the part taken by the Fifth Ohio Infantry in the action at Chancellorsville, Va., for the three days ending May 3:

On the morning of May 1, the regiment was encamped in the woods on the right of the Plank road, in the rear of the line of rifle-pits. At 10 a. m. the regiment was formed in line. At 10.30, artillery firing was heard on the right. At noon, musketry was heard from the same direction and from the left. Shortly after noon, the right of the regiment was deployed as skirmishers, and the line was advanced. The demonstration of the enemy having been checked, the regiment at 2 p.m. resumed its old position in bivouac. At about 5 p.m. the enemy, in considerable force, was thrown forward toward our batteries and was repulsed, the regiment holding itself in readiness for any emergency. On the night of May 1, the regiment lay on its arms.

May 2.--Heavy artillery firing during nearly the whole day. Early in the afternoon the brigade was advanced some distance beyond the works. The enemy was found in such force in the woods that the troops, after some heavy skirmishing, were ordered back to their old positions.

During the night of May 2, the regiment lay immediately in the rear of the rifle-pits, the right wing in the rear of the Sixty-sixth Ohio, and the left wing in rear of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania. Early in the evening of May 2, a tremendous rush of stragglers from the Eleventh corps nearly overwhelmed the regiment. A line of skirmishers at short intervals was deployed at right angles with the line of works, and in some measure stemmed the torrent. Some of these stragglers, either through panic or intentionally, fired upon the regiment, but without effect. The right of our line having been broken, and enfilading fire of artillery was turned upon us. Toward midnight this ceased.

May 3.--Artillery commenced firing at sunrise in our immediate vicinity and toward the right rear. At about 7 a. m. the regiment, with the brigade, left the works under a very heavy artillery fire, and formed some distance in the rear of the guns, which were posted facing the curve of the Plank road from the southwest. The enemy, in heavy force, having failed to take this position, the regiment, accompanying the brigade, resumed its position in the works. To protect our flank, regiments were deployed across the woods at right angles with and to the rear of the works. This position was resumed so hastily that the regiment faces the rifle-pits by the rear rank, the left wing being on the right. While the troops were in this formation, the enemy, well concealed and in very heavy force, attacked. The regiments, deployed in line to the right almost immediately, were driven from protecting our flank, and fifteen or twenty minutes of a terrible enfilading fire forced the regiment to retire. Outside the woods the formation was again resumed, and the woods charged successfully three times. The regiment was at last withdrawn upon receipt of orders, and retired to the rear of the second line formed on the right.

On the evening of May 3, the regiment was posted on the road to the United States Ford, in the immediate rear of the works occupied by the Eleventh Corps.

Killed....................................................... 5

Wounded...................................................... 52

Missing...................................................... 25

Total....................................................... 82

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, A. A. A. G., First Brig., Second Div., Twelfth Army Corps.

During May and June 1863, the Confederacy's Army of Northern Virginia launched an invasion through western Virginia into Maryland and Pennsylvania. On July 1, 1863, the Union's Army of the Potomac engaged the enemy army at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. In the Battle of Gettysburg (July 1-3, 1863), the 5th remained under constant fire on the Union right along Cemetery Hill. After the battle, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report:

Gettysburg Battle-field, July 4, 1863.

Lieut.: In pursuance to orders from brigade headquarters, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Fifth Ohio Volunteers in the action near Gettysburg:

We commenced operations by an order to proceed to the extreme left of our line, and occupied a hill covered with trees. The One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers was also placed under my command, to extend and increase the front of our position. We deployed as skirmishers in our front across an open valley to a light strip of woods, and in front of that timber facing an open field, for the purpose of guarding against a flank movement of the enemy.

We remained there until the following morning, when we received orders at 5 o'clock to return to the brigade. We advanced to the right of our line; halted, formed double column closed en masse, stacked arms, and remained until evening, when we were ordered to a position on our right flank, for the purpose of holding the enemy in check, for they had advanced on our right. We remained there about two hours, when we were ordered to return and take position.

The men rested on their arms until daylight, when we were replaced, by an order from Col. Charles Candy, commanding brigade, farther forward, in order that we might have a better view of the enemy and be well protected from his fire. The first firing commenced about 3.50 a. m., and continued until 11 a. m. without intermission.

As the fight progressed and the forces took position, it became obvious to me that a line of skirmishers should be thrown forward on our flank and behind a stone wall, which would enable us to give the enemy a cross-fire. I immediately ordered Company F, of our regiment, in command of Lieut. Brinkman (a brave and gallant officer, who fell during the action), to advance with his company as skirmishers, having the stone wall for a protection. I instructed him to fret the enemy as much as possible, for the purpose of drawing him from his intrenchments.

The result was most satisfactory, the skirmishers annoying the enemy so much that they were compelled to make a charge on our skirmishers, and either capture or drive them, neither of which was accomplished. As soon as they were fully uncovered, they received volley after volley, until they were forced to retire. The same effort was made a second time, and with the same result.

To the above strategy I attribute a large share of our success, for the rebels were driven back with terrific slaughter after the second repulse, and retreated from the breastworks. Very soon after this last repulse, we occupied the intrenchments. During the rest of that day and the night following, they annoyed us considerably with their sharpshooters. Some of them had air-rifles, and we could not discover their whereabouts. At night the flashes of the regular rifles can be seen, but there is no warning from the air-rifle. The enemy retreated from our front some time in the forepart of the night.

Respectfully submitted.

J. H. PATRICK, Col. Fifth Ohio.

Following the Battle of Gettysburg, the 5th advanced into Virginia. In late August 1863, the regiment boarded steamers at Alexandria and sailed to New York, New York, to help authorities to quash draft riots raging in the city. The organization arrived at New York Harbor in late August 1863 and, on September 8, 1863, returned to its old camp at Alexandria, before advancing to Manassas Junction, Virginia.

In late September 1863, officials ordered the 5th to the Western Theater, where the regiment entered camp at Bridgeport, Alabama. On November 24, 1863, the organization advanced upon Chattanooga, Tennessee, where the Confederacy's Army of Tennessee had besieged the city's Union garrison since late September 1863. On that day, Union forces, including the 5th, drove Southerners from Lookout Mountain, which overlooked Chattanooga. After the battle, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, December 2, 1863.

SIR: In obedience to order from division headquarters of December 1, 1863, I have the honor to report the part taken by the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the engagement on Lookout Mountain:

There were seven companies on picket at Lookout Creek, from the extreme left, extending above the burnt bridge on the railway and connecting with the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The attack on the rebel pickets was opened by the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Several shots exchanged, when the rebels retired before our men. The Fifth went to several rebel picket posts and relieved them without resistance.

One officer, with 20 men, came from the mountain to re-enforce the rebel picket reserve, but on hearing that our forces were on the mountain surrendered. We took 130 at this point.

Three companies proceeded with the column along the side of the mountain as far as the white house, when they were detailed to take charge of prisoners, but remained with the column until evening, when we returned the prisoners to headquarters, taking a receipt for them. Two companies remained at headquarters to take the prisoners to Kelley's Landing, and eight companies remained on picket at the pontoon bridge, repairing roads, &c., until the return of the Second Division from Ringgold. We turned over 1,293 prisoners in all.

All of which is most respectfully submitted.

J. H. PATRICK, Col. Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, Acting Assistant Adjutant-Gen.

On the next day, Northerner units but not the 5th  stormed Missionary Ridge, driving Confederate General Braxton Bragg's remaining soldiers from the ridge, attaining a Union victory, and ending the Chattanooga Campaign.

After the Chattanooga Campaign, the 5th returned to the organization's old campground at Bridgeport, Alabama. The 5th spent the winter of 1863-1864 at this location, conducting a few expeditions into northern Georgia.

On May 3, 1864, the 7th embarked upon Union General William T. Sherman's Atlanta Campaign. The goal of this expedition was for Northern forces to capture the important manufacturing center of Atlanta, Georgia. The 5th fought in many of the early engagements of the campaign, including the Battles of Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta. After Resaca, many of the regiment’s members reenlisted. The re-enlistees received a thirty-day furlough to their homes in Ohio. Upon returning to the front, these men continued upon the Atlanta Campaign. Union forces occupied Atlanta on September 2, 1864, bringing the campaign to a victorious conclusion for the North. During the campaign, the various commanding officers of the 5th filed the following reports:

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, Near Cassville, Ga., May 21, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with circular from division headquarters, May 20, 1864, I beg leave to submit the following report of the part taken by the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry in the engagement at Mill Creek Gap, Ga., May 8, 1864, and the engagements following to May 20, 1864:

On arriving at Mill Creek, Ga., the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry was ordered to support a piece of artillery of McGill's battery on the road running east, remaining perhaps one hour, when ordered, in conjunction with Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers and One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, to support two batteries at the base of Rocky Face Ridge. At 4.30 p. m. the regiment was ordered to proceed up the mountain and relieve the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry (by order of Col. Candy). The knapsacks of the men were left under guard at the base of the mountain and the regiment ascended the mountain. On our way up the mountain an order was received from Col. Candy, through Lieut. Hedges, of the pioneer Corps, that the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry would relieve the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who were engaged with the enemy near the crest of the mountain. Gen. Geary gave orders to the commanding officer of the regiment to instruct Col. Candy that the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry should be placed in position to cover the retreat down the mountain, which would take place after dark. Orders were then received from Col. Candy to place the regiment in position in line on a ridge on the right of the road (with Company A deployed as skirmishers), with its right thrown back, the left resting on the road. This being done, Companies I and K were thrown forward fifty yards on the left of the road. We remained in this position until all the troops on the mountain had fallen back, when the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered to retire, leaving a line of skirmishers in charge of Lieut. Plaisted instructed to fight our way down the mountain if attacked. We retired in good order without firing, arriving at the point from which the fight began at about 10 p. m. Four men of Company A, who were deployed as skirmishers, are missing, and have not been heard from, supposed to be captured. Received orders on the 12th instant to be ready for marching. Moved with the brigade to the east end of Snake [Creek] Gap and went into camp for the night. On the following day (13th) at 2 p. m. moved four miles on the road leading to Resaca and formed in line of battle in the rear of the Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, a part of which division being at the time engaged with the enemy, who retired from the hills in our front. About 5 p. m. was moved with the brigade to a hill in our front, some half mile, where we remained during the night, erecting rifle-pits, expecting an attack from the north during the night or early in the morning. Remained in this position until 2 p. m. of next day (14th), when we were moved with division to the extreme left of our line of battle; formed in line on the crest of a hill on the immediate left of First Division Twentieth Army Corps; threw forward one company of forty-five men as skirmishers, and remained there during the night. On the following morning (15th) moved out on the road leading south from Dalton. At about 10 a. m. were thrown forward with the division to the crest of one of a range of hills, where the enemy was found in large numbers. Brisk firing began about 11 a. m. with musketry and artillery, the enemy retiring rapidly, followed closely by our troops. When the enemy had been driven within his intrenchments the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, with the brigade, was massed on a side hill, within range of the enemy's musketry, in rear of Second Brigade, Second Division, and portions of the Third Division. We remained in this position until 9 p. m., sustaining a loss of 3 killed and 12 wounded. The regiment did not become engaged, although one company was sent out as sharpshooters. At 9 p. m. an order was received from Gen. Geary for the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry to move out some distance in front of our line of fortifications to support a detachment of troops under Col. Cobham, Third Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Instead of acting as support as ordered the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was sent under Lieut.Col. Kilpatrick, at the request of Col. Cobham, to relieve the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, who occupied the front line on the crest of a hill about twenty-five yards from a rebel fort containing four guns, which Col. Cobham bad been ordered to secure. (For details see special report.) On the morning of the 16th moved out with the division in pursuit of the retreating enemy, advancing cautiously during the entire day, crossing the Coosawattee River at McClure's Ford, and encamped for the night, resuming the pursuit on the following day at 1 p. m., marching seven miles, encamping on Curtis' plantation, three miles south of Calhoun. Started again on the following morning (18th) and marched about eighteen miles, encamping on a large plantation upon the same ground that the rebel army encamped upon the night previous. Resumed our march at daylight on the morning of the 19th, and moved out upon the main road leading to Atlanta. After having marched about one mile the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered by Gen. Geary to move to the front, where they were deployed as skirmishers, followed by the brigade. We advanced in line as skirmishers some six miles, the right of the line connecting with the Fourth Army Corps and the left of the line with Third Division. At 3 p. m. the regiment assembled with the brigade near Cassville, Ga., and after a short rest was moved forward about one mile to the right of the line occupied by Third Division, who were engaging the enemy. We were formed in line of battle and moved forward to the edge of the woods in our front, skirmishing going on between the enemy and the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who occupied the front line. Darkness coming on prevented us moving farther, and the regiment remained in line during the night. The enemy decamped during the night, and the Fifth Regiment, with the brigade, went into camp for the purpose of cleaning up and resting.

All of which is most respectfully submitted,

JOHN H. PATRICK, Col. Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. THOMAS H. ELLIOTT, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Twentieth Army Corps.

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS, May 20, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report in reference to the capture of four brass cannon on the night of May 15, 1864:

Capt. Lambert gave me a verbal order to report to a detachment of troops with my regiment in our front, under command of Col. Cobham. I stated that I would take command of the troops, being senior officer. He said that he would have to report to Gen. Geary first. He returned and told me that I would not receive orders from Col. Cobham, but would form a line in his rear to support him, if necessary. I proceeded to the ground designated by Capt. Lambert. In about half an hour Col. Cobham came and asked me to go to the front line. I sent the regiment in charge of Lieut.-Col. Kilpatrick, and remained in my position. (See Lieut.-Col. Kilpatrick's and Capt. Shirer's reports, inclosed.)

Very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

JOHN H. PATRICK, Col. Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteers.

Capt. T. H. ELLIOTT, Asst. Adjt. Gen., Second Div., Twentieth Army Corps.

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VETERAN VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Mill Creek, Ga., May 11, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with circular from headquarters First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, calling for report of part taken by the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the action of the 8th, I beg leave to submit the following:

On arriving at Mill Creek, Ga., the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry was ordered to support a piece of artillery of McGill's battery on the road running east, remaining perhaps an hour, when ordered, in conjunction with Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania, to support two batteries at the base of Rocky Face Ridge. At 4.30 p. m. the regiment was ordered to proceed up the mountain and relieve the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. By order of Col. Candy the knapsacks of the men were left under guard at the base of the mountain, and the regiment ascended the mountain. On our way up the mountain, an order was received from Col. Candy, through Lieut. Hedges, of the pioneer corps, that the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry would relieve the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who were engaged with the enemy near the crest of the mountain. Gen. Geary gave orders to the commanding officer of the regiment to instruct Col. Candy that the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry should be placed in position to cover the retreat down the mountain, which would take place after dark. Orders were then received from Col. Candy to place the regiment in position in line on a ridge on the right of the road, with Company A deployed as skirmishers, with its right thrown back, the left of the regiment resting on the road. This being done, Companies I and K were thrown forward fifty yards on the left of the road. We remained in this position until all the troops on the mountain had fallen back, when the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered to retire, leaving a line of skirmishers in charge of Lieut. Plaisted, instructed to fight our way down the mountain if attacked. We retired in good order without firing, arriving at the point from which the fight began at about 10 p. m. Four men of Company A, who were deployed as skirmishers, are missing, and have not been heard from; supposed to be captured.

Respectfully submitted,

R. L. KILPATRICK, Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Regt.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

CAMP IN THE FIELD, May 20, 1864.

SIR: The following is my report of the part the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry took in the capture of the four cannon from the dug-out fort in the hill in front of the position held by the Second division on the 15th of May:

I was put in command of the regiment about 10 p. m. of the same day, with instructions to take orders from Col. Cobham. I received orders from Col. Cobham to take the regiment out and relieve the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania. I found that regiment on or near the crest of the hill, with the right resting on the fort, where a working party had commenced digging a road to the guns. We relieved the One hundred and eleventh and then retired. About twenty minutes after we were in position, a brisk musketry fire commenced on our line far on our right and extended along 400 or 500 yards on our left. This continued for about twenty minutes. Half an hour after the firing ceased Col. Cobham sent an aide asking me how the working party was succeeding. I sent word that the working party had left in a hurry during the firing. I soon received orders to assume the entire control of the getting out of the cannon. I placed Capt. A. T. Shirer in command of the working party (whose report is herewith inclosed), to consist of Companies G, H, I. K; C and A were afterward added. The other companies were placed so as to cover the working party. In about two hours the road was completed and the guns were commenced to be taken out. I sent to Col. Cobham for fifty men without arms to assist in taking the guns out. Fifty men of the Thirty-third New Jersey reported promptly. By the time they arrived two guns were out of the fort and going down the hill. Capt. Shirer used these men in hauling out the other two, and I then gave orders to Capt. Shirer to take charge of the four guns and take them to Gen. Geary's headquarters without delay. I reported the completion of the work to Col. Cobham, and in half an hour was by him ordered to report back to our brigade, which we did, reaching our command by 3 a. m. May 16. It is with great pleasure that I recommend Maj. H. E. Symmes, Capt. Austin T. Shirer, and Lieut. Koogle, of our regiment, for the zealous and determined manner in which they performed their duty in executing their tiresome and hazardous task. Also Corpl. George W. Tyrrell, Company H, of our regiment, for taking down the rebel flag that is now in possession of the Fifth Ohio Veteran Volunteers and bringing it off.

I have the honer to be, very respectfully your obedient servant,

L. KILPATRICK, Lieut.-Col. Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Col. COBHAM Commading Third Brigade

CAMP IN THE FIELD, May 20, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report:

On the night of the 15th of May, 1864, the Fifth Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteers was ordered to support the Third Brigade in getting four pieces of artillery out of a captured fort, of which the enemy held session of the rear, their pickets being within twenty yards of one of the guns. After one-half hour's digging through the front side of the fort our lines were attacked by the enemy. The party engaged in digging broke and left the hill, leaving their tools in the work. Our regiment remained until the firing ceased. I was then ordered by Lieut.-Col. Kilpatrick to take a detachment of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and finish digging through the embankment and get the artillery out without delay. I took Companies A, G, H, I, and K to complete the work, which took some two hours' hard labor. After getting out all the pieces but two, which I found to be a difficult matter without more assistance, I applied to the major of one of the regiments to send down the hill and get some of his men without arms to assist in getting out the other two pieces, which he did, the balance of our regiment being under arms as our support. As soon as the pieces were pulled out of the fort I relieved his men and proceeded with the pieces to the rear and reported to Gen. Geary, who ordered me to keep them until morning, when they were taken charge of by Knap's battery.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUSTIN T. SHIRER, Capt. Company G, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Col. COBHAM, Cmdg. Third Brigade.

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, June 9, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with circular from division headquarters of June 9, 1864, calling for part taken by Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the recent battles near Dallas, I have the honor to make the following report:

Left camp on the morning of the 18th at 5.30 o'clock, taking the main road leading to Atlanta. Our progress was very slow in consequence of the Fourth Army Corps having the right of the road. The road being clear at about 10 a. m. our column moved forward, diverging from the main road through a broken, unsettled part of the country, the greater portion of the time following blind roads.

We halted for the night on Curtis' plantation, marching a distance of eighteen or twenty miles. Started next morning (19th) at 6.30 o'clock, and, after marching about two miles, the Fifth Ohio was deployed as skirmishers, under the direction of Gen. Geary. The entire regiment was deployed and moved forward, our left to connect with the skirmishers of Gen. Butterfield, who were moving on our extreme left; our right to connect with the Fourth Army Corps, who were moving upon the extreme right of our line. We moved in this manner about five miles when, in consequence of conflicting commands, our regiment became separated, the right wing forming with the remainder of the brigade at 1 p. m. The left wing continued in line as skirmishers until 2 p. m., when it was reformed in column and moved forward and joined the right wing, who, with the remainder of the brigade, were massed in rear of Third Division, who were engaging the enemy near Cassville. At 4.30 p. m. we were moved forward about two miles, when we were formed in line of battle, the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry being deployed as skirmishers. We advanced through open fields to the edge of a dense forest, where the line was halted, where it remained during the night and until about 11 a. m. the following day (20th), when we moved back about one mile and went into camp in the woods. Orders were received here to rest and recuperate, preparatory to the coming twenty days' campaign, which would soon commence. The sick and disabled were sent to the rear, and everything put in readiness for further active duties. We left our camp on the morning of the 23d, moving out upon the road leading to Atlanta; crossed the Etowah River nine miles south of Cassville, encamping in line of battle in the woods upon the south side of the river. Started next morning (24th) at 5.30 o'clock, moving very cautiously in consequence of skirmishing in front, the entire force being formed in different columns; halted frequently during the day, marching about fourteen miles, encamping for the night at Burnt Hickory. May 25, left our camp at 6 a. m.; arrived at the bridge across Pumpkin Vine Creek at 8 o'clock--halted three-quarters of an hour for the bridge to be repaired. Our advance guard was fired upon from the opposite bank of the creek. At 9 o'clock we crossed the creek; the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, deployed as skirmishers, followed by the Fifth Ohio in column. We had advanced in this manner about two miles, Gen.'s Hooker and Geary, with their staffs and escorts, following in rear of skirmishers and in front of Fifth Ohio, when our skirmishers ran upon the enemy, who fired a volley into the right of the line, evidently intended for the generals, who were plainly visible to the rebels in our front. The Fifth Ohio was moved forward into line in support of the skirmishers, and in a very few moments came in sight of the enemy, who were advancing in line at a distance of about 1,000 yards. The rebels opened fire upon our regiment with one or two well-directed volleys, which could not be returned immediately, owing to our being so close upon our line of skirmishers. The sudden attack upon our regiment for the moment threw the right wing into confusion, but when ordered to advance the regiment opened fire upon the enemy, driving him before us in great confusion. Up to this time the remainder of the brigade had not got into line, and prisoners who had been captured informed us that the enemy outnumbered us, and were reforming to advance upon us. The Fifth Ohio was halted until the brigade was put in line, when a temporary breast-work was thrown up to protect us from the sharpshooters of the enemy. The Fifth Ohio sustained a loss of 7 killed and 51 wounded in this skirmish. We remained in this position until 5 p. m. (the First and Third Divisions, of Twentieth Army Corps, had moved forward and were warmly engaged with the enemy) when we were ordered to advance. The brigade was formed in line, the Fifth Ohio occupying the center. We advanced to within musket-range of the enemy, who were then actively engaged with our advanced lines and firing from very short range. On nearing the scene of action we were greeted with tremendous volleys of musketry, grape, canister, and shell. The firing continued until about 8 p. m., when it ceased entirely. Col. John H. Patrick was mortally wounded with canister in our advance just at night-fall, also 2 men killed and 3 wounded. When the firing ceased our men were compelled to lie down in line of battle, our brigade being the second line. A drizzling rain set in and continued during the entire night. At 3 o'clock next morning the line in front of us moved out without notifying us, thereby leaving us in the front line. At 4 a. m. (26th) our regiment was advanced about fifty yards, and commenced throwing up a breast-work, which by 8 a. m. was sufficient to protect the men from the enemy's smallarms. Intrenching tools were brought up, and the work strengthened to resist solid shot. During the entire day and night of the 26th we remained in the intrenchments, advancing a line of skirmishers about twenty-five yards in front of the intrenchments, who kept up a fire in reply to the enemy's sharpshooters, who were posted behind trees for the purpose of picking off our men working on the trenches. We had 5 men wounded on the 26th. We remained in the trenches until the evening of the 27th (having 1 man wounded), when we were relieved by the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and retired to a ravine, about fifty yards in rear of line of works, to cook coffee, our men not having had an opportunity to do any cooking from the afternoon of the 25th until 9 p. m. of the 26th. We remained in this ravine until the evening of the 28th (having 2 men wounded), when we moved into the intrenchments again, relieving the Seventh Ohio. During the night of the 28th and during the day of the 29th a desultory fire was kept up by our skirmishers, with no casualties. We were relieved on the evening of the 29th by the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteers, and retired to a second line of works about twenty-five yards in rear of first line, where we remained until the night of the 31st, having 1 man seriously wounded, when we again occupied the front line. During the night an advanced line of works and abatis were constructed by detachments of the Twenty-ninth and Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, under the direction of Maj. H. E. Symmes, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which at 4 a. m. of the 1st was partially completed. The Fifth Ohio was moved forward to the new line at daylight, when, with aid of a fresh supply of intrenching tools, and by dint of hard labor, the breast-work at 10 a. m. was so far completed as to make it proof against solid shot, but could not be rendered bullet-proof before we had 1 man killed and 1 wounded by balls passing through the works. We were relieved at 12 m. of the 1st of June by the Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and retired about one mile to the rear, where we halted about two hours, when we marched with the brigade and division to the extreme left of the line of battle, about three miles; went into camp for the night in the woods. At 12 m. of the 2d we moved out and advanced about three miles through a terrible thunder-storm to the support of the Twenty-third Army Corps, who were skirmishing with the enemy. We remained quietly in camp until the morning of the 6th, when we moved about four miles farther to the left and front, halting in edge of woods, where we have remained until the present time. The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry sustained a loss in the eight days' fighting, from the 25th of May, in killed and wounded, as follows: 1 officer killed and 2 wounded, 11 enlisted men killed and 64 wounded.

Respectfully submitted,

R. L. KILPATRICK, Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Fifth Ohio Vols.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Camp at Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864.

SIR: In compliance with Circular Orders, No. 98, from Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps headquarters, I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in the late campaign, commencing May 11, 1864, and ending September 7, 1864:

May 11, on arriving at Mill Creek, Ga., the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered to support a piece of artillery of McGill's battery on the road running east, remaining perhaps one hour, when ordered, in conjunction with Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, to support two batteries at the base of Rocky Face Ridge. At 4.30 p. m. the regiment was ordered to proceed up the mountain and relieve the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. By order of Col. Candy the knapsacks of the men were left under guard at the base of the mountain, and the regiment ascended the mountain. On our way up an order was received from Col. Candy, through Lieut. Hedges, of the pioneer Corps, that the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry would relieve the Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who were engaged with the enemy near the crest of the mountain. Gen. Geary gave orders to the commanding officer of the regiment to instruct Col. Candy that the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry should be placed in position to cover the retreat down the mountain, which would take place after dark. Orders were then received from Col. Candy to place the regiment in position in line on a ridge on the right of the road, with Company A deployed as skirmishers, with its right thrown back, the left resting on the road. This being done, Companies I and K were thrown forward fifty yards on the left of the road. We remanied in this position until all the troops on the mountain had fallen back, when the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered to retire, leaving a line of skirmishers in charge of Lieut. Plaisted, instructed to fight our way down the mountain if attacked. We retired in good order without firing; arrived at the point from which the fight began at about 10 p. m. Four men of Company A, who were deployed as skirmishers, were missing, and have not been heard from; supposed to have been captured. There were [no] casualties. May 12, received orders to be ready for marching; moved with the brigade to the east end of Snake [Creek] Gap and went into camp for the night. May 13; moved at 2 p. m. four miles on the road leading to Resaca, and formed in line of battle in the rear of the Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, a part of which division being at the time engaged with the enemy, who retired from the hills in our front. About 5 p. m. were moved with the brigade to a hill some half a mile in front, where we remained during the night erecting rifle-pits, expecting an attack from the north during the night or early in the morning. May 14, remained in the same position as on the 13th, until 2 p. m., when we were moved with the division to the extreme left of our line of battle, formed in line on the crest of a hill on the immediate left of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Threw forward one company of forty-five men as skirmishers, and remained thus during the night. May 15, moved out on the road leading south from Dalton, and about 10 o'clock were thrown forward with the division to the crest of one of a range of hills, where the enemy was found in large numbers. Brisk firing began about 11 a. m. with musketry and artillery, the enemy retiring rapidly, followed closely by our troops. When the enemy had been driven within his intrenchments the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with the brigade, was massed on a side hill, within range of the enemy's musketry, in rear of Second Brigade, Second Division, and portions of Third Division. We remained in this position until 9 p. m., sustaining a loss of 3 men killed and 12 wounded. The regiment did not become engaged, although one company was sent out as sharpshooters. At 9 p. m. an order was received from Gen. Geary for the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to move out some distance in front of our line of fortifications to support a detachment of troops under Col. Cobham, Third Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps. Instead of acting as support as ordered, the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was sent under command of Lieut. Col. R. L. Kilpatrick, at the request of Col. Cobham, to relieve the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, who occupied the front line on the crest of a hill about twenty-five yards from a rebel fort containing four pieces of artillery, which Col. Cobham had been ordered to secure. The party at work digging out the guns being attacked, broke and left the hill, leaving their tools in the work. Our regiment remained until the firing ceased, when Lieut. Col. R. L. Kilpatrick ordered Companies A, G, H, I, and K, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, to complete the work, which took some two hours' hard labor. After getting out all but two, which could not be taken out without more assistance, which was furnished, the balance of the Fifth being under arms as support, the two remaining pieces were successfully taken out, making four in all. They were taken to the rear and a report of operations sent to Gen. Geary, who ordered four companies of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry to guard the guns till morning, when they were taken charge of by Knap's battery. May 16, moved out with the division in pursuit of the retreating enemy. Advancing cautiously during the entire day, crossed the Coosawattee River at McClure's Ford and encamped for the night.

May 17, remained in camp until 1 p. m., then resumed the pursuit of the enemy, marching seven miles, encamping for the night on Curtis' plantation, three miles south of Calhoun. May 18, marched this day about eighteen miles encamping for the night on a large plantation upon the same ground that the rebel army encamped on the night previous. May 19, resumed our march at daylight and moved out upon the main road leading to Atlanta. After having marched about one mile the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was ordered by Gen. Geary to move to the front, where they were deployed as skirmishers and moved forward--our left to connect with the skirmishers of Gen. Butterfield, who were moving on our extreme left; our right to connect with the Fourth Army Corps, who were moving upon the extreme right of our line. He moved in this manner about five miles, when in consequence of conflicting commands our regiment became separated, the right wing forming with the remainder of the brigade at 1 p. m. The left wing continued in line as skirmishers until 2 p. m., when it was reformed in column and moved forward and found the right wing, which with the remainder of the brigade was massed in rear of the Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, who were engaging the enemy near Cassville. At 4.30 p. m. we were moved forward about two miles, when we were formed in line of battle. The Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry being deployed as skirmishers, we advanced through open fields to the edge of a dense forest, where the line was halted and it remained in same position all night, men sleeping on their arms and with their accouterments on. May 20, moved back about one mile and went into camp in the woods. Orders were here received to rest and recuperate, preparatory to the coming twenty days' campaign, which would soon commence. The sick and disabled were sent to the rear. May 21, regiment in camp all day receiving fresh supply of clothing, cleaning up arms and accouterments, washing, &c. May 22, regiment in camp employed the same as the day previous; everything was put in readiness for further active duty. May 23, left camp, moved out upon the road leading to Atlanta; crossed the Etowah River nine miles south of Cassville, encamping for the night in line of battle in the woods upon the south side of the river. May 24, started this day about 5.30 a. m., moving very cautiously in consequence of skirmishing in front, the entire force being formed in different columns; halted frequently during the day; marched about fourteen miles; encamped for the night at Burnt Hickory. May 25, left our camp about 6 a. m.; arrived at the bridge across Pumpkin Vine Creek at 8 a. m., where we halted three-quarters of an hour for the bridge to be repaired. Our advance guard was fired upon from the opposite bank of the creek. At 9 a. m. we crossed the creek; the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry was deployed as skirmishers, followed by the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in column. We advanced in this manner about two miles, Gen.'s Hooker and Geary, with then staffs and escorts, following in the rear of the skirmishers and in front of the Fifth Regiment, when our skirmishes ran upon the enemy, who fired a volley into the right of the line, evidently intended for the generals, who were plainly visible to the rebels who were in our front. The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was moved forward into line in support of the skirmishers, and in a very few moments came in sight of the enemy, who were advancing in line at a distance of about 1,000 yards. The rebels opened fire upon our regiment with two well-directed volleys, which could not be returned immediately owing to our being so close upon our line of skirmishers. The sudden attack upon our regiment threw the right wing for a moment into confusion, but when ordered to charge the regiment opened a promiscuous fire and drove the enemy before them, killing and wounding many and capturing 3 prisoners. Up to this time the remainder of the brigade had [not] got into line, and the prisoners captured informed us that the enemy outnumbered us, and were reforming to advance, when in consequence the brigade was halted, and temporary breast-works thrown up. Remained in this position till near dark, at which time we were ordered to advance, the Fifth in the center. On nearing the scene of action we were greeted with tremendous volleys of musketry, grape, canister, and shell. The firing continued until 8 p. m., when it ceased entirely. The men were compelled to lie down in line of battle, our brigade being the second line. It now became pitch dark and a drizzling rain set in, which continued during the greater part of the night. In this action the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry lost Col. John H. Patrick, who was mortally wounded with canister-shot, and died within one hour after receiving the wound. The regiment further lost 1 commissioned officer wounded, 9 enlisted men killed and 54 wounded. May 26, at 3 o'clock in the morning the line in front of us moved out without notifying us, leaving us thereby in the front. At 4 o'clock our regiment was advanced about fifty yards, and commenced to throw up breast-works, which by 8 a. m. was sufficient to protect the men from the enemy's small-arms. Intrenching tools were brought up, and the work strengthened to resist solid shot. Regt. remained all day in breast-works. Advanced a line of skirmishers some distance, who kept up a fire in reply to the enemy's sharpshooters, who were posted behind trees; casualties in the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry for this day were 5 men wounded. May 27, remained in breast-works all day till near evening, when the regiment was relieved by the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and we were permitted to retire to a ravine about 100 yards in rear of our works to cook coffee, our men not having had an opportunity to do any cooking for forty-eight hours; casualties for the day. 1 man wounded. May 28, regiment in the ravine all day; in the evening we moved into the intrenchments again, relieving the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry; casualties during the day, 2 men wounded. May 29, regiment in the breast-works all day; a desultory fire was kept up. In the evening we were relieved by the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. We retired to a second line of breast-works, about twenty-five yards in rear of the first, and remained during the night; no casualties during the day. May 30, regiment in second line of works all day; had 1 man severely wounded. May 31, regiment in same breast-works as day previous. In the evening we again occupied the front line, relieving the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. During [the night] an advance line of works and abatis were constructed by details from nearly all the regiments, under the direction of Maj. H. E. Symmes, Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

June 1, the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was moved forward to the new works about 4 a. m., and by dint of hard working the breast-works at 10 a. m. were so far completed as to make them proof against solid shot. During this operation we had 1 man killed and 1 severely wounded. We were relieved at 12 m. by the Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and retired about one mile to the rear, where we halted and cooked dinner, after which the regiment marched with the brigade and division to the extreme left of the line of battle, a distance of about three miles; went into camp for the night in the woods. June 2, moved this day at 12 m. and advanced about three miles through a terrible thunder-storm to the support of the Twenty-third Army Corps, who were skirmishing with the enemy; went into camp in the woods. June 3, in camp all day. June 4, in camp all day; drizzling rain. June 5, in camp all day, regiment having an inspection of arms and accouterments. June 6, regiment in camp all day. June 7, moved forward; marched till 3 p. m.; went into camp near a place called Acworth. June 8, regiment in camp near Acworth, Ga., all day. June 9, 10, and 11, regiment still in camp near Acworth. June 12, regiment still in camp near Acworth, Ga. The members of the regiment whose term of service had expired and was about to terminate were ordered to Chattanooga, to be mustered out, under charge of Lieut. Col. R. L. Kilpatrick and ten line officers. Gen. Geary gave them a farewell address; was responded to by the men with three cheers for the general. June 13, regiment in camp near Acworth, Ga., all day, Maj. H. E. Symmes in command. June 14, regiment received marching orders. A detachment of the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, including one veteran company, whose term of service had not yet expired, were attached to our regiment. We moved forward to breast-works in front of Pine Knob, relieving part of the Fourth Army Corps. We were relieved in turn by the Fourth Army Corps within two hours, and retired in the rear of Knap's battery and encamped for the night. June 15, marched some three miles, drove in the enemy's pickets, and the brigade engaged the enemy, the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in reserve. During the night threw up breast-works. Maj. H. E. Symmes had his horse killed under him in this advance. June 16, regiment engaged in strengthening breast-works all day, the rebels keeping up a sharp fire nearly all day from their breast-works with musketry and artillery. The casualties for the day in the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry were 3 men severely wounded and 1 mortally. The detachment of the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry had 5 men wounded and 1 mortally. In the evening our regiment was ordered out on the skirmish line to relieve the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was done successfully. June 17, at 3 o'clock in the morning the advanced skirmishers of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry discovered that the rebels had evacuated their works. This information was given to Maj. Symmes, who immediately sent word to the brigade commander. At 5 a. m. our men were in the rebel works; remained there until breakfast had been cooked and eaten. The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry was then ordered to advance, which was done. We moved a short distance when we struck a road leading east in the direction of Marietta. Part of the regiment, deployed as skirmishers, advanced this way about one mile and a half; took some 5 rebel prisoners, when we came upon the right of the Fourth Army Corps. This caused a halt; we remained here some three hours, when we received orders to rejoin the brigade, which was done accordingly. We then advanced about three-quarters of a mile with the brigade and halted. In the evening we were ordered to the support of Bundy's battery, stationed about three-quarters of a mile to our right. Remained there all night. June 18, regiment in same position as the evening previous, in support of Bundy's battery; casualties for the day, 2 men wounded in the detachment Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry. June 19, the regiment was ordered to move forward with the brigade; entered the rebel breast-works about 10 a. m., they having left during the night. We advanced about a mile beyond the rebel works; formed in line amid a terrible rain-storm, and remained in that position during the balance of the day and night; no casualties. June 20, regiment in same position as the day previous. In the afternoon we were relieved by the Fourth Army Corps. Moved to the right about three miles. The Fifth was then ordered on picket for the night and deployed as skirmishers. June 21, the regiment was relieved from picket duty about 10 a. m. and ordered to build breast-works on the extreme left of the brigade, which was done accordingly. The regiment was engaged all day and part of the night in completing their works. June 22, the brigade moved forward about one mile and threw up works; the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry followed about two hours afterward, having been left in the old works in case the advance should be unsuccessful. Remained in support as a reserve till evening, when we entered the new works on the left of the brigade and remained during the night; casualties, 2 men wounded. June 23, regiment in breast-works all day; skirmish guard out; no casualties. June 24, regiment in breast-works all day; no casualties. June 25, regiment still in same breast-works; no casualties. June 26, regiment in same breast-works; received orders in the evening to be ready to move at 4 a. m. June 27, regiment ready to leave at 6 a. m.; regiment fell in, stacked arms in breast-works; were relieved by the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps; retired to the rear of breast-works about twenty-five yards; at 8 a. m. the regiment was ordered out to the reserve skirmish line and prepared to charge the rebel skirmish line, which was done about 9 a. m.; the charge was successful; took about 25 prisoners from the rebel skirmish pits; then commenced to throw up breast-works; the rebels shelled our position furiously, some eight shots striking the houses in our immediate neighborhood; toward evening tore down the two houses in neighborhood to secure position and strengthen the works; casualties for the day, 2 commissioned officers slightly wounded, 1 enlisted man killed and 26 wounded. June 28, regiment in the works erected on the 27th; remained all day; heavy skirmish firing from our works all day; in the afternoon the rebels opened on us with artillery; fired about ten shots at us, doing no damage; about dusk Maj. H. E. Symmes was severely wounded in the thigh of his right leg by a musket-ball; in the evening put out vedettes; no alarm during the night; 4 enlisted men wounded during the day. June 29, regiment in same position and works as on the 28th instant in the evening put out vedettes; casualties during the day, 1 man killed and 4 wounded. June 30, regiment in same position and works as on the 28th; received orders to be ready to move in the evening; were relieved by the Seventy-sixth Indiana Volunteers, of the Fourth Army Corps, at 8 p. m.; marched all night to the right of the line; entire distance marched was about five miles; relieved the Sixth Tennessee Infantry, of the Twenty-third Army Corps, and occupied their breastworks, where we remained; 110 casualties.

July 1, all day in breast-works; toward evening put out skirmish guard; at 8 p. m. were ordered to pack up and leave; marched to the rear to the second line of works, distant from the first about 800 yards; set the regiment immediately to work to strengthen the works; casualties during the day, 3 men slightly wounded and 1 severely. July 2, regiment remained all day in second line of works still at work strengthening them; no alarm during the day; casualties, 1 man slightly wounded by a stray shot. July 3, received marching orders early in the morning; moved about 6 a. m.; entered the enemy's intrenchments, they having vacated during the night; left the enemy's intrenchments and marched about three miles in a southeasterly direction in pursuit of the rebels and halted; skirmishing heard in advance of us; formed in line with the Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and rested for several hours; made dinner, after which detailed sixty-four men and five lieutenants to act as an advance guard; at 1.30 o'clock fell in and marched in a direction due south, frequently halting and resting; after having marched four miles halted and camped for the night within sight of the enemy; no casualties during the day. July 4, remained in position as on the evening of the 3d, advance guard still out; moved camp about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, taking ground to the left about 1,200 yards; advance guard relieved and rejoined the regiment about 6 o'clock in the evening; received orders to be ready to move on skirmish line, but remained quiet all night; no casualties during the day. July 5, were in the same position as on the evening of the 4th; received orders to be ready to move at a moment's notice; about 8 a. m. the regiment received detail as division wagon guard; wagons started about 2.30 p. m.; marched about four miles, halted at 8 p. m., and camped for the night. July 6, started again with wagon train about 9 a. m.; marched about one mile, halted, and made dinner, then camped near a creek; the wagon train parked and made camp. July 7, regiment in camp with wagon train all day. July 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, regiment remained in camp with the wagon train. In the evening of the 17th received marching orders; started with wagon train at 8 p. m. and marched all night. July 18, halted at 5.30 in the morning; men very sleepy; made breakfast and started again at 8 a. m. and halted in one hour and a half within half a mile of the Chattahoochee River; made camp and rested for the balance of the day. July 19, started with the wagon train early in the morning, marched all day till 4 p. m., when an order was received from Col. Candy to rejoin the brigade without delay, which he could not do immediately on account of the men having no rations and being much fatigued. July 20, started for the brigade at 2 a. m.; after marching five miles reached the brigade at 9 a. m., after considerable trouble and difficulties; formed in line in the breast-works at 10.30 a. m., advanced about three-quarters of a mile from the first works, halted, and were ordered to erect breast-works; the Fifth had to change their line of works twice; third time remained; at 4 o'clock the rebels made an attack in force and flanked the extreme right of our brigade; the Sixty-sixth and Twenty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers gave way and retreated in confusion; the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, assisted by the One hundred and ninth New York, held their ground under a severe fire; the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry assisted in taking two pieces of artillery belonging to Bundy's (Thirteenth New York) artillery from the place vacated by our retreating forces and placing them in position to fire upon the rebel flank; the Sixtieth New York came up and erected a temporary breast-work facing the rebel flank; the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry remained in their old works for two hours without ammunition; the top of the flag-staff was shot away; we had 1 commissioned officer severely wounded, 2 men killed and 9 wounded; at dark we strengthened the works and remained all night; no alarm during the night. This action took place at Peach Tree Creek, Ga. July 21, remained in breast-works all day near Peach Tree Creek; toward evening there was severe skirmishing on the right of the line; we were not engaged; no casualties during the day. July 22, moved out of breast-works at 8.30 a. m., reached the rebel breast-works at 9 a. m., halted and rested for about one hour, then advanced to within one mile and a half of the city of Atlanta, formed in line on the right of the brigade and put up breast-works, but did not finish them; at 3 p. m. moved to the left of the brigade and occupied the breast-works of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers; remained in this position for the night. July 23, remained in breast-works all day; about 11 o'clock there was an alarm; skirmishers were driven back, but recovered their ground; during the day cannonading from both sides; no casualties. July 24, regiment in same breast-works all day; cannonading mostly by the rebels; in the evening heavy cannonading by the rebels, also heavy skirmishing; looked like an attack, but none was made; during the night sent out thirteen men to chop logs for new breastworks; no casualties. July 25, the entire regiment on fatigue, building new breast-works about 1,800 yards in advance of our old ones; no casualties. July 26, regiment in old breast-works all day; fatigue party out at work on new breast-works; no casualties. July 27, regiment moved into new breast-works at 7.30 a. m.; men at work strengthening the works and making large traverses; several rebel shells fired into the works, but no harm done; heavy skirmishing during the day, but no alarm during the day; no casualties. July 28, regiment in new breast-works before Atlanta all day; several alarms, but nothing serious; no casualties. July 29, in breast-works all day; no casualties; artillery bombarding the city. July 30, regiment in breast-works all day; heavy cannonading by the rebels firing on our skirmish line; casualties, 1 man wounded whilst out on skirmish line firing. July 31, regiment in breast-works all day; nothing unusual occurred during the day; no casualties.

August 1, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms during the day or night; no casualties. August 2, regiment in breastworks all day; no alarms; casualties, 1 man killed while on duty as alarm guard. August 3, regiment in breast-works all day; one alarm during the day, caused by our pickets feeling their front; no casualties. August 4, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarm and no casualties. August 5, regiment in breast-works all day; two alarms during the day, caused by our skirmishers advancing; no casualties. August 6, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms during the day; toward evening considerable cannonading from our side; no casualties. August 7, regiment in breast-works all day; received orders to be very vigilant; reported rumor of a midnight attack; no alarm nor attack occurred during the night; no casulties. August 8, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarm nor casualties. August 9, regiment in breast-works all day; heavy cannonading all along the line by order of Gen. Sherman ordering each piece to fire fifty rounds; no casualties. August 10, regiment in breastworks all day; no alarms nor casualties. August 11, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms nor casualties. August 12, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms nor casualties. August 13, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms nor casualties; heavy cannonading from our side during the night. August 14, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms except one in the night on the right of the Second Division, but it did not reach us; no casualties. August 15, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms nor casualties. August 16, regiment in breast-works all day; received notice to use extra vigilance as the enemy were massing in our front, but no alarms occurred, and no casualties. August 17, regiment in breastworks all day; no alarms; were inspected during the day by the brigade acting assistant inspector-general; no casualties. August 18, early in the morning, heavy cannonading by the rebels, replied to by our artillery; regiment remained in breast-works all day; no further alarms during the day, and no casualties. August 19, regiment in breast-works all day; early in the morning heavy cannonadeing from our side; no casualties during the day. August 20, regiment in breast-works all day; no alarms nor casualties. August 21, regiment the same as on the 20th instant. August 22, 23, and 24, the regiment was in breast-works; no alarms of any kind occurred, nor any casualties. August 25, regiment in breast-works all day; in the evening received marching orders, [vacated] the breast-works about 9 p. m., marched one mile to the rear, near to Gen. Geary's headquarters, halted and rested there till 12 o'clock at night; the retreat from the works was successful; no alarm occurred during the movement. August 26, started at 1 a. m., marched as far as the old rebel breast-works near Peach Tree Creek and had a short halt and rest; marched again all morning till we came in sight of the about three miles; went into camp for the night in the woods. At 12 m. of the 2d we moved out and advanced about three miles through a terrible thunder-storm to the support of the Twenty-third Army Corps, who were skirmishing with the enemy. We remained quietly in camp until the morning of the 6th, when we moved about four miles farther to the left and front, halting in edge of woods, where we have remained until the present time. The Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry sustained a loss in the eight days' fighting, from the 25th of May, in killed and wounded, as follows: 1 officer killed and 2 wounded, 11 enlisted men killed and 64 wounded.

Respectfully submitted,

R. L. KILPATRICK, Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Fifth Ohio Vols.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, A. A. A. G., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

In mid-November 1864, the 5th joined General Sherman's "March to the Sea." The ultimate goal of this campaign was for the Union military to seize Savannah, Georgia. The regiment saw no real combat on this campaign. The Union military occupied Savannah on December 21, 1864, with the 5th entering camp in the city’s vicinity. After the march, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Savannah, Ga., December 26, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to forward the official report of operations of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry from September 2, 1864, to December 21, 1864:

The regiment entered the city of Atlanta, Ga., on the 4th day of September, 1864, and went into camp. The months of September and October were occupied in building defenses around the city and doing garrison duty.

On the 9th day of November the regiment was ordered into the works to assist in repulsing an attack made by the enemy's cavalry. On the 13th day of November the regiment was ordered to report at brigade headquarters, and then marched out to assist in destroying the Atlanta and Chattanooga Railroad. On the 15th day of November the regiment broke camp and marched out on the road leading to Decatur, Ga. Nothing of importance took place until the 18th instant, when the regiment halted and stacked arms and assisted in destroying the railroad near Rutledge, Ga., and on the 19th, when near Parks' Ferry, went into camp and destroyed the railroad. On the 22d we crossed the Oconee River and passed through Milledgeville, Ga., the capital of the State of Georgia, and camped outside the city, where we remained until the 24th, when we again resumed the march, and entered Sandersville, Ga., on the 26th instant, and marched to Tennille Station, on Central railroad; there we assisted in destroying the railroad an camped for the night. On the 27th instant we continued the destruction of the road until 3 p. m., when we marched to Waynesborough and camped for the night. On the 28th instant we marched back toward Tennille and destroyed the railroad as we went, and then marched back to Waynesborough and camped for the night.

On the 1st of December we crossed the Ogeechee River, and continued our march without interruption until the 10th, when we arrived in camp near Savannah, Ga. On the 11th we moved into line, left in front, and near the Savannah River. At 3 p. m. we moved out and took position on a road leading to the Savannah River, where we remained, doing skirmish duty and erecting field-works, until the morning of the 21st, when we were ordered to fall in and moved into the city of Savannah, Ga., the enemy having evacuated. We were then put on guard over the ordnance and ordnance stores in park and arsenal which were left by the enemy, and an inventory taken.

Sir, respectfully submitted.

ROBERT KIRKUP, Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

In late January 1865, the 5th Ohio embarked upon General Sherman’s Carolinas Campaign. During this campaign, the regiment participated in the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina from March 19 to 21, 1865. Following this Union victory, the 5th moved to Goldsboro, North Carolina. During the campaign, the 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEERS, Near Goldsborough, N. C., April 1, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to forward the official report of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry for the late campaign from Savannah, Ga., to Goldsborough, N. C.:

The Fifth Regt. Ohio Volunteers left Savannah, Ga., on the 27th of January, 1865, and marched to Sister's Ferry, where we arrived on the 29th of January.

On the 4th of February crossed the Savannah River at sister's Ferry and continued the march from day to day, passing through Blackville, S. C., February 10, and crossed South Branch of Edisto River at Duncan's Bridge the same night. On the 12th of February the regiment was ordered to join the advance guard. Two companies, A and B, were then deployed on the right of the road leading to a crossing of the North Branch of the Edisto River. Arriving at the crossing, the enemy had burned the bridge and were ready to resist our crossing. The regiment was then deployed to the right of the road. Company K and a part of Company F then crossed the river in a small boat procured below the crossing and charged up the road, when the enemy opened with two pieces of artillery, and after firing some six shots fell back. Five men of the regiment were wounded in this affair. On the 13th of February, while the regiment was forming a line in rear of the One hundred and forty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, one man of the regiment was killed. Continued the march until the 18th of February, and crossed the Saluda River some four miles above Columbia, S. C. February 20, crossed Broad River. February 21, marched into Winnsborough, S. C., and the regiment was deployed through the town as provost guards. Resumed the march on the 22d of February, and on the 23d crossed the Wateree River. On the 26th camped near Hanging Rock, S. C.

Passed through Westchester [Chesterfield] about Court-House on the 4th of March, and marched through Cheraw, S. C., and crossed Big Pedee River on the 5th [6th] of March. Passed through Fayetteville on the 13th of March and crossed Cape Fear River. On the 19th we marched to Mill Creek Church, and on the 23d crossed the Neuse River and entered Goldsborough on the 24th of March and went into camp.

Respectfully submitted.

ROBT. KIRKUP, Lieut.-Col., Cmdg.

Lieut. A. H. W. CREIGH, Actg. Adjt. Gen., First Brigade.

Following Johnston's surrender, the 5th marched to Washington, DC, where the organization participated in the Grand Review on May 24, 1865. The 5th’s commanding officer issued the following report regarding the march from Goldsboro:

HDQRS. FIFTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, Near Bladensburg, Md., June 3, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to forward to you the official report of the operations of the Fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the campaign from Goldsborough, N. C., to Alexandria, Va., from April 10, to May 19, 1865:

 The regiment left camp at Goldsborough, N. C., April 10, 1865, and marched thirteen miles and camped for the night. April 11, resumed the march at 6 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and camped for the night. April 13, resumed the march at 5.30 a. m. and marched fourteen miles, arriving at Raleigh, N. C., and camped near the city; and here we remained in camp until the 25th of April, when we marched from Raleigh, N. C., some fourteen miles, and camped here until the 28th of April, and we then marched back to Raleigh, N. C. April 29, in camp near Raleigh, N. C. April 30, broke camp and marched through Raleigh, N. C., on our way to Richmond, Va.; marched twelve miles and camped for the night.

May 1, 1865, resumed the march, and marched twenty-two miles and camped for the night. May 2, resumed the march, and marched nine miles and camped for the night. May 3, resumed the march, and marched twenty miles and camped for the night. May 4, left camp at 6 a. m., and marched twenty-three miles and camped for the night. May 5, left camp at 5.30 a. m., and marched twenty miles and camped for the night. May 6, left camp at 10 a. m., and marched sixteen miles and camped for the night. May 7, left camp at 7 a. m., and marched eighteen miles and camped for the night. May 8, left camp at 9 a. m., and marched seventeen miles and camped for the night. May 9, resumed the march at 10 a. m., and marched through Richmond and camped crossed James River, and marched through Richmond and camped some three miles from the town. May 12, resumed the march at 6 a. m., and marched thirteen miles and camped for the night at Ashland Station. May 13, left camp at 6 a. m.; crossed South Anna River and New Found River and marched fourteen miles and camped for the night. May 14, left camp at 6 a. m., crossed North Anna River and marched seventeen miles and camped for the night. May 15, left camp at 5.30 a. m.; crossed Po River; passed through Spotsylvania Court-House and Chancellorsville, Va.; crossed the Rappahannock River, and made seventeen miles and camped for the night. May 16, left camp at 5.30 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and camped for the night. May 17, left camp at 5.30 a. m.; crossed Cedar Creek and camped near Brentsville; made fifteen miles. May 18, resumed the march at 9 a. m.; marched fourteen miles and camped for the night. May 19, left camp at 6 a. m.; passed through Fairfax Station and camped three miles from Alexandria, Va.

Respectfully submitted.

ROBT. KIRKUP, Lieut.-Col., Cmdg. Fifth Ohio Volunteer Cavalry.

Capt. A. H. W. CREIGH, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 20th Army Corps.

In June 1865, the regiment proceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, taking the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Parkersburg, West Virginia and then boarding a steamer and sailing down the Ohio River the remainder of the way. On July 26, 1865, the 5th mustered out of service at Louisville. The regiment then proceeded to Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio, where officials discharged the unit's members, allowing the men to return to their homes.

During the 5th Ohio's term of service, 146 men, including nine officers, died from wounds received on the battlefield. An additional fifty-seven men, including two officers, died from disease or accidents.

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MLA Style

"5th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Three Years Service)," Ohio Civil War Central, 2019, Ohio Civil War Central. 14 Oct 2019 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=1281>

APA Style

"5th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Three Years Service)." (2019) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved October 14, 2019, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=1281

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