37th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1861-1865)

Also Known As: Thirty-seventhth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: February 07, 2014

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Soldiers of Ohio infantry regiments served the Union for varying lengths of time, ranging from one hundred days to three years. One of the three-year regiments was the 37th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. The regiment consisted primarily of Germans from Cleveland, Toledo, and Chillicothe, Ohio. Recruits also came from Auglaize, Franklin, Mahoning, Tuscarawas, Erie, Wyandot, and Mercer Counties. The organization mustered into service at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio, on October 2, 1861.

In October 1861,, the 37th advanced to the Kanawha Valley in present-day West Virginia.  Shortly after arriving in western Virginia, the regiment joined an expedition against enemy forces at Cotton Hill, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). The Northerners drove the Southerners from Cotton Hill and pursued the retreating Confederates as far as Raleigh Court House, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). Following this advance, the 37th entered winter encampment at Clifton in present-day West Virginia. During the winter of 1861-1862, the regiment carried out periodic excursions, including one in January 1862 to Logan Court House, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). The 37th captured the town from Confederate cavalrymen, having two men killed during the assault.

In March 1862, the 37th joined the Third Provisional Brigade of the Kanawha Division and embarked upon a raid with this division against the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad at Wytheville, Virginia. The Northern command failed to reach Wytheville, as Confederate forces thwarted the advance by engaging the Union soldiers at Princeton, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia). Following this Union defeat, the 37th withdrew to Flat Top Mountain in present-day West Virginia, where the organization entered camp. On August 1, 1862, the regiment moved to Raleigh Court House. In late August, the organization marched to Fayetteville, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia), where the 37th garrisoned the community with the 34th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry. On September 10, 1862, enemy forces attacked the garrison, prompting the Northerners to retreat to Cotton Hill. On the following day, the Confederates attacked this new position, forcing the Union soldiers to withdraw. On September 13, the Northerners arrived at Charleston, in present-day West Virginia. A skirmish erupted at Charleston, resulting in the Union forces to retreat to the Ohio River, where the Northerners encamped at Point Pleasant, Virginia (modern-day West Virginia).

On October 15, 1862, the 37th returned to the Kanawha Valley and entered camp at Gauley Bridge on November 20, 1862. On December 30, 1862, the regiment marched to Camp Piatt in present-day West Virginia and boarded steamers for Cincinnati, Ohio. The organization received new Enfield rifles at Cincinnati, before sailing down the Ohio River and then the Mississippi River to Napoleon, Arkansas, where the 37th disembarked on January 16, 1863. At Napoleon, officials assigned the regiment to the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fifteenth Army Corps of the Army of the Tennessee. On January 21, 1863, the 37th moved to Milliken's Bend, Louisiana, where the organization began to work on a canal that would allow Union gunboats to sail safely past the Confederate stronghold of Vicksburg, Mississippi. Flooding prompted officials to move the regiment to Young's Point, Louisiana, where the 37th conducted several raids across the Mississippi River and also up the Yazoo River.

On April 29, 1863, the 37th boarded steamers for Haines's Bluff on the Yazoo River. The regiment soon returned to Young's Point, before sailing to Grand Gulf, Mississippi on May 13, 1863. The 37th next joined General Ulysses S. Grant's siege of Vicksburg. From late May to early July 1863, the regiment helped Union forces besiege the city's Confederate garrison. During the Vicksburg Campaign, the 37th's commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH OHIO VOLUNTEER INFANTRY, May 23, 1863.

SIR: The regiment went into position on the right of the brigade on the morning of the 19th day of May, 1863; under command of Lieut. Col. Louis von Blessingh. Three companies, Maj. Charles Hipp commanding, were previously detached to reconnoiter on the right flank and form connection with the left of Gen. Steele's division, near the evacuated barracks of the enemy. Maj. Hipp, with his detachment, rejoined the regiment at the opening of the fight, when the assault on the enemy's works was in progress. The regiment was then formed for the assault, with skirmishers in front, who, by order of the general commanding, moved forward slowly, when the Fourth West Virginia and Forty-seventh Ohio Regiments rushed forward, carrying with them some of our skirmishers and others on the left of the regiment. The three companies then arriving: with Maj. Hipp, were ordered to deploy on the crest of the hill: the balance being already over, and all were ordered to halt and Open fire on the enemy. The regiment remained in the same position the whole day, constantly firing, withdrawing after night. The loss of the regiment this day was 8 killed and 36 wounded.

At noon of the 20th, the regiment opened fire again from the crest of the hill until night, when it was relieved by the Fourth West Virginia. The loss this day was 3 killed, amongst whom were 2 officers, and 3 wounded.

On the 21st, the regiment had 1 wounded; since dead.

The night following, two companies (G and C) of the regiment were on picket on right of the brigade ground, joining the left of Gen. Steele's division, and Company D and part of Company F on fatigue. Leaving these, with the exception of Company C, to occupy the enemy on the right, the rest of the regiment marched with the brigade, being the second in front: to the assault of the enemy's works on the left of our former position, commanded by Lieut. Col. Louis van Blessingh. The progress was soon retarded by some of our men of the first three companies blocking up the way with some men of the previously advanced regiment. The following companies forced their way over them, and came forward in good style; then deployed on the crest of the hill, next to the enemy's works, and opened fire on them, which was kept up during most of the day. Lieut. Col. Louis van Blessingh was here wounded, and the command of the regiment devolved on Maj. Charles Hipp. Our loss on this day was 8 killed and 31 wounded.

The gallant conduct of the 13 men who volunteered for the storming party deserves particular mention. Several of them were among the first to the enemy's works.

The conduct of the officers was, without any exception, praiseworthy and brave: and they: as well as the non-commissioned officers and men, have done their duty to my entire satisfaction.

CHARLES HIPP, MAJ.: Comdg. Thirty-seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

Lieut. H. J. VOTTELER, Acting Adjutant Thirty. Seventh Ohio Volunteer lnfantry.

Upon the Northern occupation of Vicksburg on July 4, 1863, the 37th joined General William T. Sherman's advance upon Jackson, Mississippi. After the Union captured this location, the regiment performed garrison duty in the city for several days, before encamping at Camp Sherman on the Big Black River.  

On September 26, 1863, the 37th returned to Vicksburg, where the organization boarded the steamer Nashville for Memphis, Tennessee. From Memphis, the regiment marched to Corinth, Mississippi and then to Cherokee Station, Alabama, reaching this last location on October 20, 1863. On October 26, the regiment marched with its division against Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest's cavalry. On November 21, 1863, the 37th arrived in the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tennessee, where the Confederacy's Army of Tennessee had besieged the Union's Army of the Cumberland since late September 1863. On November 24, 1863, the regiment was in position in front of Missionary Ridge. On the next day, Union forces stormed the Confederate lines on the ridge, driving the enemy from the heights and bringing the Chattanooga Campaign to a successful conclusion for the North. In the Battle of Missionary Ridge, the 37th had five men killed and thirty-six more wounded.

The 37th joined the Union's pursuit of the retreating Confederates as far as Ringgold, Georgia, before marching for Knoxville, Tennessee, where a Confederate force had besieged the city's Union garrison. Other Northern forces had lifted the siege before the regiment arrived, so the 37th marched to Bridgeport, Alabama and entered camp at Larkinsville, Alabama on December 26, 1863. During February 1864, the organization participated in two expeditions--one to Lebanon, Alabama, and the other to Cleveland, Tennessee. On March 8, 1864, three-fourths of the regiment reenlisted in the Union military. The re-enlistees received a thirty-day furlough to their homes in Ohio.

Upon returning to the front, the 37th embarked upon Union General William T. Sherman's Atlanta Campaign. The goal of this expedition was for Northern forces to capture the important manufacturing center of Atlanta, Georgia. The regiment fought in many of the largest engagements of the campaign, including the Battles of Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Nicojack Creek, Chattahoochie River, Atlanta, and Jonesborough. The Union military occupied Atlanta on September 2, 1864, bringing the campaign to a victorious conclusion for the North. During the campaign, the 37th's commanding officers issued the following reports:

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH REGT. OHIO VOL. INFTY., Near Atlanta, Ga., July 29, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit the following report of the Thirty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry of the battle on the 28th day of July, 1864, near Atlanta, Ga., participated in by said regiment:

The regiment marched to the right of our line, and took position about 10 a. m. on the right of the brigade, which was at the same time the extreme right of the army. By verbal order of Gen. Howard, commander of the Department of the Tennessee, six companies of the regiment were deployed as skirmishers to cover our right flank, and soon after two more companies were advanced as advanced pickets on the several by-roads leading to our line. The enemy soon appeared in heavy force in our front and flank, and drove in the skirmish line. Maj. Charles Hipp, commanding the regiment, was severely wounded at this time, and Capt. Carl Moritz, Company B, took command of the regiment. The regiment fell back from the ridge previously occupied, rallied on the next in rear of the former, and advanced in line of battle to its first position, driving the enemy. By gathering fence rails it erected light breast-works, which were held during the remainder of the day against the fierce and incessant assaults of the enemy, which were repulsed at each time with heavy loss to him. In the mean time the regiment was supported by detachments from other army corps, and ordered in the reserve position for about three hours, when it reoccupied its position in the front line. When night broke in the enemy ceased his assaults, and the regiment was enabled to throw up substantial breast-works on its line.

The following are the casualties of the regiment:* Officers--wounded, 1. Enlisted men killed, 1; wounded, 5; missing, 2.

I have the honor, respectfully, to remain, your obedient servant,

CARL MORITZ, Capt., Cmdg. Regt.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-Gen., Washington, D. C.

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH REGT. OHIO VOL. INFTY., Near Jonesborough, September 1, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit the following report of the Thirty-seventh Regt. Ohio Volunteer Infantry of the battle near Jonesborough, Ga., August 31, 1864, participated in by said regiment:

On the night of August 26, 1864, the regiment marched out of the intrenchments near Atlanta toward the railroad which leads from Atlanta to West Point, Ga. After the same was completely destroyed, it resumed its march and advanced in an easterly direction against the railroad leading from Atlanta to Macon, and came to a position about half a mile west of said railroad, after having pressed back the skirmishers of the enemy during the whole day. August 30, the regiment marched in line of battle as support of the skirmishing line of the brigade. On the 31st of August the forenoon was occupied with erecting breast-works to strengthen the position. At about 2.30 p. m. the enemy advanced in heavy force, and endeavored, by several charges, to take our gained position, but was repulsed at each time with severe loss to him.

The casualties of the Thirty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry on the 30th and 31st of August were as follows: Officers wounded, 1; enlisted men wounded, 8.

I have the honor, respectfully, to remain, your obedient servant,

CARL MORITZ, Capt., Cmdg. Regt.

L. THOMAS, Adjutant-Gen., Washington, D. C.

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH REGT. OHIO VOL. INFTY., Near Lovejoy's Station, Ga., September 5. 1864.

Detailed report of the operations of the Thirty-seventh, Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the campaign commencing May 3, 1864, up to and including the occupation of Atlanta.

I have the honor to transmit the following report of the Thirty-seventh Regt. Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as required by Special Field Orders, No. 117, dated September 4, 1864:

The regiment, which on its return from veteran furlough in Ohio arrived at Louisville, Ky., on the 1st day of May, 1864, met on its journey to the front with a serious railroad accident near Munfordville, Ky., by which it suffered a loss of 1 killed and 30 wounded enlisted men. Arrived in Nashville on the 3d, and in Chattanooga on the 6th of May, at which place it received new muskets. On the 8th of May it marched from the latter place toward Resaca, Ga., escorting the train, of the First Division. Fifteenth Army Corps, and joined its brigade on the 10th of May in Sugar Creek Valley. It participated in the battle at Resaca on the 13th, 14th, and 15th of May, and marched with the brigade, by the way of Calhoun to Kingston, where it bivouacked until the 23d of May. Lieut. Col. L. von Blessingh, commanding the regiment, left the same on the 23d on sick leave, and Maj. Charles Hipp took command. On the 23d of May the regiment marched with the brigade to Dallas, Ga., which place was reached on the 25th of May, and participated in the actions near said place on the 28th and 29th of said month. On the 1st of June the regiment marched via Pumpkin Vine Creek toward New Hope Church, took position in the lines previously occupied by the Twentieth Army Corps, which were held and defended against the enemy until the 5th of June, when the latter retreated. The regiment then marched with the brigade to Acworth, in which vicinity it bivouacked until the 10th of June, when it advanced, with the brigade, against Big Shanty, which place was reached on tho same day. From the 10th to the 14th the regiment held, with the brigade, the right of the Fifteenth Army Corps, when it advanced more southeast, and near the position of the enemy on Kenesaw Mountain.

On the evening of the 16th of June the regiment occupied a part of the thus advanced lines, sent out its skirmishers, and remained in this position until the 19th, when the enemy retired more to the summit of the mountain, and was followed by our advancing forces. The regiment remained directly in front of Kenesaw Mountain until the 26th of June, all the time engaged in sending out skirmishing parties and supporting the skirmishing lines of the brigade. On the 26th of June the regiment moved, with the brigade, more to the right of the line previously occupied, and participated, on the following day, June 27, in the assault on the works of the enemy, but which was repulsed by the same. The regiment remained under the artillery fire of the enemy until 11 p. m., when it retired. On the 28th it went in our reserve lines, where it bivouacked, engaged in making out its regimental and company reports for muster and inspection.

On the 2d day of July the regiment marched, with the brigade, to the extreme right of the army, taking the Sandtown road, and arrived at its position at 1 p. m., and intrenched itself there. On the 3d day of July the regiment, with the brigade, supported part of the Sixteenth Army Corps in its attacks on the enemy's lines near Nickajack Creek, which ho was forced to abandon, and continued in the same service on the 4th July. From the 5th to July 12 the regiment confronted, in various positions, the enemy who was intrenched on the northern bank of the Chattahoochee River, when the regiment marched, with the brigade, to the extreme left of our army, and crossed, on the 14th, the Chattahoochee River at Roswell Factory, where it threw up intrenchments, but which [it] left on the 17th July, when it marched in a southeastern direction toward the railroad which leads from Augusta to Atlanta. The same was reached on the evening of the 18th, and completely destroyed for five miles, in which destruction the regiment took an active part. On the 19th the regiment reached Decatur, after having assisted in the destruction of another portion of said railroad on the same day. On the 26th it advanced along said railroad toward Atlanta, and, the enemy appearing in front, advanced in line of battle to a point about three miles and a half east of Atlanta, where it took position and threw up breast-works, in which it remained during the next day. The enemy left his intrenched position early in the morning of the 22d July, and the regiment, with the brigade, took possession of the same and turned them in some manner to use them against the enemy, but not sufficiently, as was shown afterward. At about 3.30 p. m. the enemy attacked the position in force, and having been successful on the left of the brigade, the regiment being posted on the right, advanced on our flank and rear, and the regiment was forced to fall back to the intrenchments occupied in the morning, though it was successful in repelling the attack of the enemy in its immediate front. The regiment advanced again, and, in about one hour from the time it retreated, re-entered the intrenchments, which were retaken from the enemy by the timely support of First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, and one brigade of the Sixteenth Army Corps. From the 23d to July 26th the regiment was engaged in fortifying the regained position and throwing out strong skirmish parties, when it marched at daybreak, on the 27th July, with the brigade, toward the extreme right of the army. On the 28th July, about 11 a. m., the regiment took position on the right of the brigade, which was at the same time the extreme right of the army. It deployed six of its companies as skirmishers to our right flank, and afterward two more companies were advanced as pickets on the several by-roads leading to our position. The enemy soon appeared in heavy force on our right flank and front, which forced the skirmishers to fall back, who afterward formed again and took position in the line of battle. At this time, Maj. Charles Hipp, commanding the regiment, was severely wounded, and Capt. C. Moritz, Company B, took command. The enemy made continuous charges for about four hours, endeavoring to break our lines, but was always repulsed with heavy loss, and, as soon as night broke in, he desisted from his assaults and disappeared from the front. The time from July 29 to August 26 was occupied by the regiment in repulsing the enemy's advanced forces, taking his rifle-pits, and advancing our main fortified position toward and near the enemy's fortifications, which were erected in front, and running parallel with, the railroad which leads from Atlanta to East Point.

On the evening of August 26 the regiment marched out of the intrenchments and took, with the brigade, the direction toward Sandtown. On the following day it resumed its march until it reached, on the 28th, the railroad leading from Atlanta to Montgomery, Ala. On the 30th the regiment resumed its march in an easterly direction to the railroad leading from Atlanta to Macon, and the enemy having appeared in front about 9 a. m., advanced in line of battle as support of the skirmishers during the remainder of the day, driving the enemy within half a mile of the railroad, when night broke in, and the regiment took its position established by the army. The regiment occupied the center of the brigade, and fortified its line by throwing up breast-works on the morning of the 31st of August. The enemy appeared at about 2.30 p. m. in heavy force, attacked our position, and, by repeated charges on our lines, tried to break our lines, but was repulsed at each time with heavy loss to him.

September 1, the enemy, though still occupying his intrenched position in front, made no further attacks on the line occupied by the regiment. During the day it threw out heavy skirmishing lines, engaging the enemy all the time, who disappeared on the following night entirely from the front of the regiment, and about daybreak the skirmishers crossed said railroad and entered Jonesborough, pursuing the retreating enemy. On the 2d the pursuit was continued toward Lovejoy's Station, the regiment, with the brigade, being in rear of the army corps, and went in bivouac near said station.

I certify that the above report is correct.

CARL MORITZ, Capt., Cmdg. Regt.

CAMP OF THIRTY-SEVENTH REGT. OHIO VOL. INFY., SECOND BRIG., SECOND DIV., 15TH ARMY CORPS, Near Kingston, Ga., May 20, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor herewith to transmit the following report of the late engagement participated in by the Thirty-seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry:

On the 10th instant, at 6 p.m., I reported with my regiment and rejoined the brigade. At Sugar Valley took position on the right center, in rear of the battery, where it remained until May 11, 2 a. m., when it was ordered to march back to Snake Creek Gap, where it took position and was engaged in throwing up intrenchments. On the 12th instant, at 8 a. m., the regiment was ordered to move forward, and took its same position which it had on the 10th instant. On the 13th instant the regiment was ordered to advance on the Resaca road, and took position of the right center of the brigade south of said road and about one mile west of Oostenaula River. At 1 p. m. this day the regiment advanced, and threw forward one company as skirmishers. With little skirmishing the regiment arrived in sight of the enemy's works at 3 p. m. this day. The regiment was then ordered to advance and occupy a strip of woods on Camp Creek, where severe skirmishing occurred. The regiment remained in its position until night break when it was ordered to fall back about 300 yards, leaving two companies on picket. The casualties this day were as follows: Killed, 1 officer; wounded, 1 officer and 8 enlisted men. May 14, the regiment occupied the same position; two companies were ordered forward as skirmishers at 5 p. m. to assist in protecting the right of the First Brigade. At 7.30 p. m. the regiment, with the rest of the brigade, was ordered to re-enforce the forces who took a position from the enemy, taking position on the left of the brigade, and remained in that position on the 15th. The casualties this day were as follows: Killed, 1 enlisted man; wounded, 1 officer and 1 enlisted man. May 16, at 3 a. m. the regiment was ordered to relieve the Fifty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry in the rifle-pits in front of the brigade, throwing one company forward as skirmishers. At 3.30 a. m. this day the enemy evacuated his fortified position. The regiment remained in its position to protect a battery until 8 a. m., when it joined the brigade within the enemy's works. At 10 a. m. the regiment was ordered, with the brigade, to march on the Calhoun road in pursuit of the enemy, crossing the river at Lay's Ferry, and encamped one mile east from the river, on the Rome road. The regiment marched thence toward Kingston, and arrived near said place on the 19th instant, 1 p. m., without further casualties.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant

L. VON BLESSINGH, Lieut. Col., Comdg. Thirty-seventh Ohio Vet. Vol. Infty.

[Brig. Gen. L. THOMAS, Adjutant-Gen., Washington, D. C.]

Following the Atlanta Campaign, the 37th entered camp at East Point, Georgia. On October 4, 1864, the regiment joined the Union's pursuit of Confederate General John Bell Hood's army, which was advancing through northern Georgia, northern Alabama, and southern Tennessee in the direction of Nashville, Tennessee.  The 37th marched through northern Georgia and briefly entered Alabama, where the organization engaged enemy cavalry forces at Gadsden. After this brief skirmish, the 37th returned to Georgia and entered camp at Ruffin's Station on the Chattahoochie River.

In mid-November 1864, the 37th Ohio joined General Sherman's "March to the Sea." The ultimate goal of this campaign was for the Union military to seize Savannah, Georgia. The regiment saw no real combat on this campaign until reaching Savannah, where the organization joined the Union's successful assault against Fort McAllister on December 13, 1864. After destroying nearly thirty miles of the Savannah and Gulf Railroad, the 37th entered camp at Savannah, which Northern forces occupied on December 21, 1864. During the campaign, the 37th's commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH Regt. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY., Savannah, Ga., January 3, 1865.

History of the Thirty-seventh Regt. Ohio Infantry Veteran Volunteers of the late campaign, from November 13, 1864, to January 2, 1865:

On the 13th day of November, 1864, the regiment marched from Camp Smyrna, Ga., to Atlanta, Ga., a distance of twelve miles, and there having been equipped, marched out of Atlanta on the 15th as a part of the army which, under the command of Maj.-Gen. Sherman, undertook the great invasion of the State of Georgia, from the northwestern part of the southeastern border of said State. The line of march the regiment made was over McDonough, Indian Springs, near which place it crossed the Ocmulgee River, passing through Hillsborough and Clinton. At the latter place, November 22, the regiment, with the Fifteenth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, went on picket on the road leading to Macon, from where the enemy's cavalry tried to enter Clinton, and cut off the train of the division. The regiment went into line of battle, and the enemy was forced to retreat by our advancing skirmish line. On the 23d the regiment remained near Clinton, covering the rear of the division, and marched on the same day toward Griswold, and joined its brigade and division near said place, after having crossed the Georgia Central Railroad; thence through Irwinton and marched to the Oconee River, which it crossed on the 26th of November, when it resumed its march through the swamps and arrived at Summerville on the 30th. The regiment, with the brigade, continued its march toward the sea-coast through the low and swampy country of Georgia, and having passed Emanuel and Bulloch Counties of said State, on the right (southwest) side of Ogeechee River, it crossed the Cannouchee River on tee 9th of December, marched to the Savannah and Gulf Railroad, and destroyed the same, in connection with the other regiments of the Second Brigade, for about five miles. Having returned the same day to the Cannouchee River, it crossed the same the next day, and also the Ogeechee River, the latter near the Ogeechee Canal, then marched toward Savannah, within nine miles of which the regiment bivouacked.

On the 12th the regiment returned with the brigade and division to the Ogeechee River, crossed it a King's Bridge on the 13th, and advanced on Fort McAllister, which was invested and carried by assault. The regiment bivouacked near the fort until December 17, when it marched with the brigade to McItosh, thirty miles southwest of Savannah, on the Savannah and Gulf Railroad, which was reached on the 18th, and the regiment being engaged in destroying the railroad completely, so that nothing was left but the twisted iron rails, until the night of the 20th. On the 21st the regiment returned to the Ogeechee River and crossed it at King's Bridge, in the meantime Savannah being evacuated by the enemy. The regiment went in bivouac eleven miles from Savannah, and marched on the 29th to within four miles of Savannah, and went into camp on the southwest side of Savannah, at the Gulf railroad, on the 2d day of January, 1865.

Distance marched from Atlanta November 15, 1864, to January 2, 1865, 374 miles.

L. VON BLESSINGH, Lieut. Col., Cmdg. Thirty-seventh Ohio Veteran Vol. Infantry.

In late January 1865, the 37th Ohio embarked upon General Sherman’s Carolinas Campaign. In South Carolina, the regiment participated in several skirmishes with Confederate forces, including stiff engagements at the crossings of the South and North Edisto Rivers. The organization also destroyed miles of railroad track along the Columbia and North Carolina Railroad. In early March 1865, the 37th entered North Carolina, arriving at Fayetteville on March 11. The regiment participated in the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina from March 19 to 21, 1865. Following this Union victory, the organization moved to Goldsboro, North Carolina, where the 37th encamped for the duration of the Carolinas Campaign. During the campaign, the 37th's commanding officer issued the following report:

HDQRS. THIRTY-SEVENTH REGT. OHIO VET. VOL. INFTY., Near Goldsborough, N. C., March 28, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the Thirty-seventh Regt. Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry during the campaign since leaving Savannah, Ga.:

On the 14th of January, 1865, the regiment broke camp at Savannah, Ga., and marched with the brigade to Fort Thunderbolt. On the evening of the 15th the regiment embarked on the steamer Crescent for Beaufort, S. C., where it arrived on the morning of the 16th, and went into bivouac three miles from the town. On the 26th were ordered to march to Beaufort, S. C., to disembark the division train. This finished, the regiment went with the train to close up on the division; went into bivouac near Pocotaligo, S. C., and remained there until the 31st. On the 1st of February, 1865, marched about ten miles and rejoined the brigade and division at McPhersonville, S. C.; marched in a northwest direction of bivouacked on the 4th at Angley's Post-Office; crossed the Big Combahee River on the 5th. On the 6th waded the Little Combahee. On the 7th struck the August and Charleston Railroad at Bamberg, S. C.; bivouacked two miles from town. On the 8th the regiment went with the brigade on a reconnaissance to the South Edisto River, and returned to camp. On the 10th crossed the South Edisto River. On the 13th the regiment with the brigade waded the swamps, one mile and a half in breadth, near the North Edisto River and crossed the river, forced the rebels from their position on the left bank of the river, thereby effecting a crossing for the corps. On the 14th passed through Sandy Run. On the 15th crossed Congaree Creek and bivouacked five miles from Columbia, S. C. On the 16th crossed Saluda River four miles above Columbia. On the 17th the regiment was detached to the train as guards, while the balance of the troops crossed Broad River. On the 18th rejoined the brigade at Columbia and marched to Section 7 on the South Carolina Railroad, and began tearing up and burning the track. On the 19th completed the destruction and returned to Columbia. On the 20th the march was continued in a northeast direction; crossed Dutchman's Creek on the 21st, and the Wateree River on the 22d; passed through Liberty Hill on the 23d. On the 26th waded Lynch's Creek, made a reconnaissance with the Fifty-fourth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry and returned the same evening; bivouacked till the 28th.

On the 1st of March the march was continued. On the 2d reached Black Creek and bivouacked. On the 3d crossed the creek and marched with the pontoon train. On the 4th marched through Cheraw, S. C., on the Pedee River. On the 5th crossed the Pedee River and marched on the Fayetteville road. On the 6th remained in bivouac. On the 7th continued the march. On the 8th crossed the line of North Carolina; went into bivouac near Laurel Hill, N. C.; in the evening broke up camp and marched in company with the Forty-seventh Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry to Lumber River; bivouacked for the night. On the 9th attempt to bridge it. The regiment was detached by order of Maj.-Gen. Howard to escort department headquarters to Randallsville, N. C. On the 10th were relieved from the train and ordered to bring pontoon train through; crossed Raft Swamp. On the 11th crossed Big and Little Rockfish Creek; bivouacked one mile from Fayetteville, N. C. On the 12th rejoined the brigade; the regiment went as escort with a forage train and returned in the evening. On the 14th crossed Cape Fear River. On the 16th crossed South River. On the 17th crossed Cohera Creek. On the 19th marched all day and at night retraced our steps, marching till broad daylight; joined the Twentieth Army Corps; bivouacked. On the 21st took up our position that in the line of battle near Mill Creek, N. C., under fire of the enemy; threw up temporary works. The regiment suffered a loss of 1 man killed and 3 wounded. On the 22d discovered that the enemy had fled. We took up our line of march at 4 a.m.; advanced our skirmishers, who closed up on the enemy's rear guard with the brigade for Goldsborough. On the 24th the regiment brought up the rear of the division, crossed the Neuse River, and passed through Goldsborough and occupied our present camping-ground.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LOUIS VON BLESSINGH, Lieut. Col. Thirty-seventh Ohio Vet. Fol. Infty., Cmdg.

Capt. FRANK M. LEWIS, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 2d Brig., 2d Div., Fifteenth Army Corps.

Following the surrender of General Joseph Johnston's Confederate army in late April 1865, the 37th marched to Washington, DC, where the organization participated in the Grand Review on May 24, 1865. In early June 1865, the regiment proceeded to Louisville, Kentucky, taking the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Parkersburg, West Virginia and then boarding a steamer and sailing down the Ohio River the remainder of the way. The 37th next traveled to Little Rock, Arkansas, arriving at this city on July 4, 1865. On August 12, 1865, the 37th mustered out of service at Little Rock. The regiment then proceeded to Cleveland, Ohio, where officials discharged the unit's members, allowing the men to return to their homes.

During the 37th Ohio's term of service, 111 men, including nine officers, died from wounds received on the battlefield. An additional ninety-five men, including one officer, died from disease or accidents.

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MLA Style

"37th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2018, Ohio Civil War Central. 22 Jun 2018 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=1262>

APA Style

"37th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2018) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved June 22, 2018, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=1262

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War