Anti-War Sentiment in Ohio During the Civil War

Anderson, Charles
Born on June 1, 1814 near Louisville, Kentucky, Charles Anderson spent his youth in Kentucky. Anderson's father, Colonel Richard Clough Anderson, was a veteran of the American Revolution who served as aide-de-camp to the Marquis de Lafayette. Continue Reading »
Anderson, William Marshall
Born on June 24, 1807 near Louisville, Kentucky, William Marshall Anderson spent his youth in Kentucky. Anderson's father, Colonel Richard Clough Anderson, was a veteran of the American Revolution who served as aide-de-camp to the Marquis de Lafayette. Continue Reading »
Anti-war Protests
During the American Civil War, nearly 330,000 Ohio men served in the Union military. Numerous Ohio civilians also supported the war effort by growing groups and manufacturing supplies for the men serving in the military. Continue Reading »
Burnside, Ambrose E.
Ambrose Everett Burnside was an American politician, industrialist, inventor, and one of five generals to command the Army of the Potomac during the American Civil War. He also served as commander of the Department of the Ohio, where he worked to eradicate opposition to the Union war effort by Peace Democrats and Copperheads. Continue Reading »
Conscription Act
On March 3, 1863 the United States President Abraham Lincoln signed the Conscription Act (aka the Enrollment Act), which required states to implement conscription (a draft) if they were unable to provide a proscribed number of volunteers for the Union forces during the Civil War. Continue Reading »
Copperheads
A majority of Northerners supported the Union war effort, yet a sizable and vocal minority opposed the conflict. Most of the opponents, the Copperheads, preferred a peaceful resolution to the war, with some of these people even calling on the North simply to leave the seceded Confederate states alone. Continue Reading »
Cox, Samuel S.
Samuel Cox was a prominent lawyer, newspaper editor, and Peace Democrat who represented Ohio and, later, New York in Congress. Continue Reading »
Fort Fizzle, Battle of
In 1863, due to the declining number of volunteers, the United States government instituted the Conscription Act. Under this directive, which was also referred to as the Enrollment Act, the federal government required states to furnish a certain number of soldiers based on each state's population. Continue Reading »
General Orders, No. 104 (U.S. War Department)
On August 13, 1862, the U.S. War Department issued General Orders, No. 104, announcing President Abraham Lincoln's executive order prohibiting citizens liable for the draft from leaving the United States, and suspending the writ of habeas corpus for persons arrested for disloyal practices. Continue Reading »
General Orders, No. 141 (U.S. War Department)
On September 25, 1862, the U.S. War Department issued General Orders, No. 141, announcing President Abraham Lincoln's proclamation suspending the writ of habeas corpus for people in rebellion against the United States. Continue Reading »

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War