African Americans in Ohio During the Civil War

Bowles, John R.
Born on June 13, 1826 in Lynchburg, Virginia, John R. Bowles eventually moved to Ohio, settling in the vicinity of Chillicothe in Ross County. Here, Bowles married Sarah Jane Bryant in 1848. Continue Reading »
Cox, Samuel S.
Samuel Cox was a prominent lawyer, newspaper editor, and Peace Democrat who represented Ohio and, later, New York in Congress. Continue Reading »
Dupree, William H.
William H. Dupree was an African-American Ohioan who served in the 55th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War. Sources disagree regarding his birth date and birthplace, with some claiming that Dupree was born in 1838 in Chillicothe, in Ross County, Ohio, with other sources contending that he was born on March 13, 1839 in Petersburg, Virginia. The sources that argue that Dupree was born in Petersburg also contend that he was born a slave. Continue Reading »
General Orders, No. 11 (Department of the South)
On May 9, 1862, Major General David Hunter, commanding the Department of the South, issued General Orders, No. 11, declaring the slaves in Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida to be forever free. Continue Reading »
McClellan, George B.
During the American Civil War, George Brinton McClellan twice served as the commanding general of the Army of the Potomac and briefly as the general-in-chief of all Union armies. Continue Reading »
Militia Act of 1862
During the American Civil War, the Militia Act of 1862 boosted the size of the Union's armed forces by authorizing the enlistment of African Americans and by empowering the president to order governors to draft citizens into state militias to meet federal manpower quotas. Continue Reading »
Presidential Proclamation 90
On May 19, 1862, Abraham Lincoln issued a presidential proclamation revoking David Hunter's general order freeing the slaves in Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida. Continue Reading »
Presidential Proclamation 93 (Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation)
Issued by President Abraham Lincoln on September 22, 1862, Presidential Proclamation 93, also known as the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation stated that people held in slavery in areas designated in rebellion against the United States as of January 1, 1863 would be freed from bondage. Continue Reading »
Presidential Proclamation 95 (Emancipation Proclamation)
Issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation stated that people held in slavery in areas designated in rebellion against the United States to be freed from bondage. Continue Reading »
Trotter, James Monroe
Born on February 7, 1842 (some sources state that he was born on November 8, 1842 or on February 8, 1842) in Grand Gulf, Mississippi, James Monroe Trotter was born a slave. His mother was Letitia, a slave, and his father was Richard S. Trotter, a white man and his owner. Trotter's father purportedly freed Trotter, Letitia, and Trotter's brother in 1856. Continue Reading »

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Ohio Civil War Central: An Encyclopedia of the American Civil War