106th Battalion Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1862 - 1865)

Also Known As: One Hundred Sixth Battalion Ohio Volunteer Infantry

Updated: August 25, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. They served for varying lengths of time, averaging one hundred days to three years. During July and August 1862, Lieutenant Gustavus Tafel recruited eight companies of the 106th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry in southern Ohio. The companies eventually reported for duty at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio. On September 4, 1862, officials ordered the regiment to Covington, Kentucky to help defend Cincinnati from Confederate General Kirby Smith's army that Northern authorities believed was advancing on the city. The 106th took up a position behind Fort Mitchel and later moved to the Tunnel Batteries. the 106th's Company E engaged in a small skirmish with Confederate soldiers at Latonia Springs. Both the Northerners and Southerners withdrew from this location, with neither side emerging victorious.

In late September 1862, the 106th moved to Louisville, Kentucky and, in early October 1862, departed Louisville for Frankfort, Kentucky, arriving on October 9. At Frankfort, the 106th mustered into service as the 106th Battalion Ohio Volunteer Infantry due to the organization not recruiting to the size of a regiment. While operating in the vicinity of Frankfort, the 106th conducted several expeditions against Confederate General John Hunt Morgan's cavalry. The battalion departed Frankfort in late October 1862, arriving at Bowling Green, Kentucky on November 4, 1862. Six days later, the organization left for Glasgow, Kentucky, where the unit engaged Confederate forces, suffering limited casualties. On November 28, 1862, the battalion advanced to Hartsville, Tennessee, where the organization participated in the Battle of Hartsville on December 7, 1862. Confederate forces captured the entire 106th except for one company that was escorting a supply train at Gallatin, Tennessee. The Southerners took the captured Northerners to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where the Confederates paroled the Union soldiers after five days of captivity. The Northerners then returned to Union lines at Nashville, Tennessee and were sent to Columbus, Ohio. The battalion became exchanged and eligible for duty on January 12, 1863.

In mid January 1863, the 106th departed Columbus for Camp Dennison and then, on March 24, 1863, Lexington, Kentucky. After a brief stay in Lexington, the battalion advanced to Frankfort, where the 106th attempted to drive Confederate guerrillas from the region. In late April, the organization received orders to march to Nashville, arriving at this city on May 4, 1863 and encamping at Fort Morton. One month later, the unit moved to Gallatin, where the organization guarded the Louisville and Nashville Railroad between Nashville and the Tennessee-Kentucky border and also engaged Confederate guerrillas. On May 4, 1864, authorities ordered the battalion to Bridgeport, Alabama, where the 106th continued to war against Southern guerrillas. In October 1864, the organization attained regimental status and became the 106th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

In January 1865, the 106th guarded fords along the Tennessee River and then relocated to Stevenson, Alabama. The regiment departed Stevenson in June 1865, moving to Nashville, where authorities mustered the organization out of service on June 29, 1865. The 106th's members then returned to their homes in Ohio.

During its term of service, the 106th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry lost thirty men, including three officers, to wounds. An additional twenty-two soldiers, including one officer, died from disease or accidents.

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MLA Style

"106th Battalion Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2017, Ohio Civil War Central. 25 May 2017 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=852>

APA Style

"106th Battalion Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2017) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved May 25, 2017, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=852

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