178th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry (1864 - 1865)

Updated: May 19, 2011

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units.

In the American Civil War, Ohio provided the federal government with 260 regiments of men, including infantry, artillery, and cavalry units. Ohioans also served in several other regiments from other states, most notably from Kentucky, West Virginia, and Massachusetts, as well as in federal units. Almost 330,000 Ohio men, including 5,092 African Americans, served in the Union military during the conflict.

Infantry regiments formed in Ohio became known as regiments of Ohio Volunteer Infantry. On September 29, 1864, the 178th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry mustered into service at Camp Chase in Columbus, Ohio. The men in the regiment were to serve a one-year term of enlistment.

Upon mustering, authorities dispatched the 178th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry to Nashville, Tennessee. The regiment arrived at Nashville in late September or early October 1864, where it joined Major General George Thomas's Army of the Cumberland in the Military Division of the Mississippi and the Department of the Ohio. Officials assigned the 178th's men to guard duty in Nashville for two weeks and then dispatched the unit to Tullahoma, Tennessee. While at Tullahoma, the regiment saw limited combat, but Lieutenant C.A. Poland of Company B did capture John Seal, a Confederate guerrilla. Union soldiers executed Seal.

In late 1864, Northern forces evacuated Tullahoma. The 178th Regiment relocated to Murfreesboro, Tennessee, where it helped to defend the town during Confederate General John Bell Hood's Army of Tennessee’s siege of the community. The 178th participated in numerous skirmishes during the siege, including the Battle of Wilkerson’s Pike, where the regiment captured two twelve-pound Napoleon cannons and two hundred Confederate prisoners. The 178th remained at Murfreesboro during the Battle of Nashville.

Following the Union victory at the Battle of Nashville, officials ordered the 178th Regiment to North Carolina. The regiment arrived at Moorehead City, North Carolina, where it joined the 23rd Army Corps. A few days later, the 178th participated in the Battle of Wise’s Fork (March 7, 1865)—the last combat that the men of the 178th saw in the Civil War. On March 23, 1865, the regiment joined Major General William T. Sherman’s army at Goldsboro, North Carolina and proceeded on Sherman’s advance towards Raleigh, North Carolina. Following the surrender of Confederate General Joseph Johnston’s army, officials assigned the 178th Ohio to garrison duty at Charlotte, North Carolina. The regiment remained at Charlotte until June 29, 1865, when officials sent the regiment to Camp Chase for discharge from military service. The 178th formally left the service on July 10, 1865.

During its time of service, the 178th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry had two men killed on the battlefield. The regiment lost sixty-six soldiers to disease or accidents.

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"178th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry," Ohio Civil War Central, 2017, Ohio Civil War Central. 23 Aug 2017 <http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=488>

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"178th Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry." (2017) In Ohio Civil War Central, Retrieved August 23, 2017, from Ohio Civil War Central: http://www.ohiocivilwarcentral.com/entry.php?rec=488

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